Friday, December 2, 2016

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, December 2, 2016

Blue Mountain Lake: Upcoming Arts Center Activities

Blue Mountain Lake Arts CenterThe Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts in Blue Mountain Lake will present its Soup Social & Holiday Sing tonight, Friday, December  2nd, at 6 pm. Visitors can sample delicious soups and stews from their neighbors and bring one to share as the Center celebrates the end of their 2016 season.

This event is free and open to the public will also feature songs of the holiday season by some of the Arts Center’s favorite performers, along with a holiday sing-along. » Continue Reading.


Friday, December 2, 2016

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, December 1, 2016

Pining For That Evergreen Smell

balsamSpeaking as a guy who can hide his own Easter eggs and still not find them, I marvel how Father Christmas, who is at least several years older than I, still manages to keep track of all those kids and their presents. Lucky for us that the most enduring memories are associated with smell. If it was not for the fragrant evergreen wreaths, trees and garlands (and possibly a hint of reindeer dung), Santa probably would have long ago forgotten his holiday duties.

Of all the memorable aromas of the holiday season, nothing evokes its spirit quite like the smell of fresh-cut pine, spruce or fir. Although most American households which observe Christmas have switched to artificial trees, about eleven million families still bring home a real tree. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 1, 2016

Current Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondacks (Dec 1)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is issued each Thursday afternoon and can be heard at North Country Public Radio on Friday mornings.

Sunrise Saturday in Lake Placid will be at 7:14 am; sunset at 4:17 pm, providing 9 hours and one minute of sunlight. The Moon will rise at 10:13 am Saturday and set at 8:12 pm; it will be Waxing Crescent, 16% illuminated.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 1, 2016

Oswegatchie Conservation Easement Recreation Plan Comments Sought

Oswegatchie Conservation Easement Area MapA draft Recreation Management Plan (RMP) for the Oswegatchie Conservation Easement is now available for public review and comment. The Oswegatchie Conservation Easement encompasses approximately 16,929 acres in the towns of Croghan and Diana in Lewis County, including more than 14-thousand acres located within the Adirondack Park.

The property includes 3.5 miles of the Middle Branch of the Oswegatchie River, shares 9.6 miles of boundary with forest preserve lands, and less than one mile of boundary with state forest land. The Oswegatchie Conservation is primarily accessed from Bald Mountain Road, leading north from Long Pond Road in the Town of Croghan. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

New Display at Fort William Henry Unveiled

exhibit-illustrating-defence-of-fort-william-henryWhat might Lake George have looked like 260 years ago, on the eve of the French attack on Fort William Henry?

That’s what Steve Collyer, an artist and Fort William Henry’s lead interpreter, has attempted to depict in a new display in the entryway to the museum and historical attraction.

The display, which includes three figures – an American colonial, a British regular and a ranger, all sculpted by the late Jack Binder decades ago – was unveiled in October. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

World of Nativities Returns to Parks-Bentley Place

img_2505The Parks-Bentley Place is once again bringing a “World of Nativities” to South Glens Falls.  Due to an anonymous donation and loan, the Historical Society of Moreau at Parks-Bentley Place has close to 300 nativity scenes from around the world to display and alternate throughout the upcoming years.

This year’s exhibit will highlight 125 of those 300 nativities. Many of the sets use unique materials from hardware to hand-blown glass while other pieces highlight characters that are traditional to the nativity’s country of origin. One set from Germany has a St. Bernard included since that dog is traditionally used for rescue and important to its culture. A Swiss nativity piece has an owl with it while a set from Peru contains a dolphin. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Adirondack Lakes Alliance to Receive Stewardship Award

adk-landowners-associationThe Adirondack Landowners Association (ALA) has announced that the Adirondack Lakes Alliance will be the 2016 recipient of the ALA Stewardship Award. This award is given periodically to groups or individuals who have made a tangible impact on the stewardship of Adirondack lands, water or communities. The award will be presented at the ALA winter meeting in Old Forge on December 2nd, 2016. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 29, 2016

On The Color of Cranberries

cranberriesAs a kid fidgeting at my grandmother’s Thanksgiving table, I often wondered, what’s the point of cranberries? She had a live-in Irish cook who insisted on serving whole cranberries suspended in a kind of gelatinous inverted bog. If I ventured to eat a berry I experienced the power of my gag reflex.

How times change! The humble American cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, in my opinion, is worthy of a downright homage. I am a fan. Yes, cranberries are tart, sour, and even bitter, but that makes them both good food and strong medicine. The Wampanoag called them ibimi, meaning sour or bitter berries. They crushed them into animal fats and dried deer meat to make pemmican, a food full of energy and vitamin C for long winter trips. Mariners brought them on sea voyages to fend off scurvy. According to passed down knowledge, the Algonquin used the leaves of cranberry to treat bladder infections, arthritis, and diabetes-related circulation problems. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Recent Adirondack Forest Ranger Rescues

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 28, 2016

A Master Trail Builder; A Vision For North Creek

route-28

To really understand this story, you have to bear in mind two distinctive things about North Creek.

One, it butts up against the mountains much tighter than most Adirondack communities. Start on the path that runs beside Town Hall (within sight of the Hudson), and within minutes you’re climbing steeply up Gore Mountain, entering one of the largest wilderness complexes in the Park. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 28, 2016

Sunday Rock: A Historic Adirondack Landmark

p1a1926headlineAmong the unusual landmarks in the Adirondacks is a massive roadside boulder in central St. Lawrence County, just three tenths of a mile west of the South Colton post office. Widely known as Sunday Rock, it is part of the legend and lore of the northwestern Adirondacks. My first visit to South Colton came several decades ago during a long road trip aimed at scouting out new places to hike and canoe. I was led there by a passage in a book titled, “Rocks and Routes of the North Country, New York,” by Dr. Bradford B. VanDiver, Professor of Geology at SUNY Potsdam when the book was released in 1976. (His story was featured in this space a few weeks ago.) » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 28, 2016

Lake George Land Conservancy Adds To Sucker Brook Protection

lglc-putnam-protected-landsThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) recently acquired 72 acres in the Town of Putnam from Thomas and Mary Ellen Eliopoulos. The land, known as the Beaver Pond property, joins another 65 acres purchased from the Bain family in September as the latest additions in a focused effort to protect the 2,000-acre watershed of Sucker Brook, a major tributary of Lake George.

As one of Lake George’s ten largest tributaries, Sucker Brook drains directly into the lake at Glenburnie, and makes a significant impact on the lake’s water quality. Its protection provides a safeguard against excess storm water runoff, erosion of the stream corridor, and nutrient loading from neighboring sources of fertilizers and road salt. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 27, 2016

Snowmobile Trail Tree Cutting And Forest Preserve Law

peter-bauer-examines-a-stump-along-a-newly-constructed-community-connector-trailA rose is a rose is a rose, Gertrude Stein said. Defining a tree is not so simple.

That question — what is a tree? — has emerged as a central issue in a long-running dispute over the construction of “community-connector” snowmobile trails in the Forest Preserve. These trails, which link hamlets, are nine feet wide (twelve feet on curves) and graded to make them smooth. » Continue Reading.


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