Tuesday, August 22, 2017

New Flood-Resilient, Fish-Friendly Culvert Installed in Jay

Nugent Rd culvertThe Ausable River Association (AsRA) has completed installation of a flood-resilient, fish-friendly culvert in the Town of Jay. The 19-foot-wide aluminum arch is designed to reduce flood risks on Nugent Road, near Glen Road.

“The old culvert, undersized and badly deteriorated, consisted of two, 30-inch pipes that could not contain the full flow of the stream and frequently flooded the road,” an AsRA announcement to the press said. “Now, the restored stream flows freely underneath the wide bottomless arch, allowing native brook trout and other wildlife safe passage under the road.”

The Nugent Road site is on a tributary of Rocky Branch, a natural stream system that descends from the Jay Mountain Wilderness and supports an abundance of wildlife. Five genetically distinct native strains of brook trout have been identified in its waters. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Placid Health, Medical Fitness Center Breaks Ground

future Adirondack Health Lake Placid Health and Medical Fitness CenterWork has begun at the site of the future Adirondack Health Lake Placid Health and Medical Fitness Center. The builders say concrete foundations are on track to be poured by the end of the month, with structural steel to follow shortly thereafter. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Peter S. Paine Jr. Awarded Marquis de Montcalm Award

Featured left to right: Beth L. Hill, President & CEO of Fort Ticonderoga; Sanford Morhouse, Fort Ticonderoga Association Board Chairman; Peter S. Paine, Jr., Fort Ticonderoga Trustee Emeritus and award recipient, and Anthony Pell, Fort Ticonderoga Trustee EmeritusFort Ticonderoga recently awarded Peter S. Paine, Jr. the Marquis de Montcalm Award. The award is Fort Ticonderoga’s highest honor and was given in recognition of Paine’s years of leadership and service to the museum.  The award was presented at Fort Ticonderoga’s Annual Summer Gala held at Fort Ticonderoga on August 12th. Paine was presented the award and given a reproduction of a Chevalier of the Order of Saint Louis, a prestigious French medal given to the Marquis de Montcalm in 1757. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 21, 2017

The North Country’s 1932 Solar Eclipse, And The Next One

The eclipse fever that has been sweeping the nation allows a glimpse of North Country life 85 years ago, when the path of totality clipped the region, allowing many upstate New York locations to experience 90 percent of the impact. It was a pretty exciting time, coming on the heels of the 1925 total solar eclipse in New York City. The Plattsburgh Sentinel reported on the viewing of that event at Saranac Lake.

“While not total, the eclipse was a magnificent spectacle, and during the greater portion, the sun was free of clouds. During the darkest period, snow fields and mountain ice caps were bathed in a violet light in which the shadows sharply were defined. The whole vast wilderness became a land of awesome beauty, with the snow and ice making a perfect background.”

In the Big Apple, the New York Stock Exchange and banks remained closed that day until after the eclipse. Many other cities did the same and launched special police patrols to prevent crimes that were normally committed under cover of darkness. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 21, 2017

8th View Plein Air Paint Out Call For Artists

View has invited artists to participate in their 8th Annual Plein Air Paint Out (PAPO) August 31, 2017 through September 2, 2017 in Old Forge.

Artists are invited to paint all around the Old Forge area, over a three day period; a list of suggested sites will be provided. In return, each artist is asked to donate one framed, ready to hang piece of artwork for the live bidding auction held at View at 5:30 pm on Saturday, September 2. All proceeds support programming at View, including exhibits, performances, workshops, and community centered activities. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 21, 2017

Military Archaeology of Upper Hudson, Champlain Valleys

Map of Lake George and Lake ChamplainOn Thursday, August 24, 2017 at the Schuylerville Town Hall, 12 Spring Street, The American Revolution Round Table of the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys will host a talk with archaeologist David Starbuck on 18th Century Military archaeology in the Upper Hudson and Champlain Valleys. The presentation will begin at 7 pm.

The waterway that runs between Albany and Canada contains the richest cluster of 18th-century military sites in the US. Fort William Henry and Fort Ticonderoga experienced fierce conflict during the French and Indian War, and the Saratoga Battlefield is forever linked to the American Revolution. While military historians have told and retold stories of the area’s battles and generals, archaeologist David Starbuck turns to the daily lives of soldiers, officers, and camp followers by examining the many objects and artifacts they left behind. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 21, 2017

Essex County Arts & Crafts Festival Aug 30-31

essex county arts and crafts festivalAn Essex County Arts and Crafts Festival will be held Wednesday and Thursday, August 30-31, at the Essex County Fairgrounds in Westport.

The Festival will present the work of artists and crafters currently working in the county and neighboring region. “It is a celebration of the reality that every town and hamlet throughout the county is home to numerous creative people who enrich their communities by their hand-made creations,” an announcement to the press said.  “People from across the county and neighboring region have signed on to present their work. Attendees to this free event will have the chance to meet the individuals making these arts and crafts.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Legacy Of A Past Eclipse Found in Essex

Full Solar EclipseThe upcoming solar eclipse will be visible in a fairly wide belt from Oregon to South Carolina. Many enthusiasts (including my neighbors) have made plans to vacation in prime viewing spots, since the phenomenon will not be visible in the Adirondacks. Here we will only experience a partial covering of the sun.

News of the eclipse has been widely reported in the press and on social media and seems to have captivated the nation. Thousands of webpages are devoted to the coming eclipse, from the official NASA site to some pretty strange sites better left unnamed. This isn’t so surprising; it strikes at something primitive in us, while at the same time piquing our post-modern interest in astronomical science, or even in the history of natural science.

And it also is nothing new. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Catch The Solar Eclipse At The Wild Center

sunfest in tupperThe Wild Center will celebrate the partial solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st. As the moon passes between the earth and the sun, its shadow will darken the sky, plunging large swathes of the United States into sudden twilight, but this alignment is far from supernatural. Naturalists will be on hand to help answer questions about all things solar.

Attendees will have the chance to take ‘Eclipse 101’ in Planet Adirondack and learn about what the eclipse is and how it works. Watch a live call-in with NASA and have questions answered by astronomers. Viewing stations for the eclipse will be on Wild Walk and outside the Naturalists Cabinet. There will also be showings of the film To Scale: The Solar System. The film shows a group of friends who build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits. Astronomers will also be on hand to help view the sun with specialized telescopes at the Adirondack Public Observatory.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Eclipse: A Dragon Devours the Sun

solar eclipseMore than 3,000 years ago, the Chinese believed that a dragon ate the sun during a solar eclipse, so they gathered outdoors to drive away the beast by beating pots, pans and drums. Some 500 years later, the Greek poet Archilochus wrote that Zeus had turned day into night.

In Australian Aboriginal mythology, Earth basked in the sun-woman’s heat and light as she traveled across the sky. When the dark orb of the moon-man mated with the sun-woman’s bright circle of light, her fire was temporarily obscured. Traditional Navajo belief holds that anyone who looks directly at an eclipse not only damages their eyes, but also throws the universe out of balance.

Humankind witnesses many dazzling astronomical events, including comets, lunar eclipses and the Aurora Borealis, but nothing inspires the imagination quite like a solar eclipse — those times when the moon’s path across the heavens brings it directly between the sun and earth. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Adirondack Public Observatory Celebrating The Solar Eclipse

There has been a lot of information in the news, blogs, and websites about the upcoming August 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse. Though it will not reach totality (completely block out the sun) in the Adirondacks, it is still an interesting phenomenon that will not occur again until 2024. The partial solar eclipse will be visible in our area. With any event that garners such attention, there are safety precautions that need to be followed.

Whether attending a formal viewing party or a solitary event, plenty of people plan to take a few moments of their day to watch the moon pass in front of the sun. One place that can answer all solar eclipse questions is the Adirondack Public Observatory (APO) in Tupper Lake. Using solar telescopes and providing special view glasses, the APO is providing an free afternoon celebrating the sun and moon. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 19, 2017

Art and Nature: A Paper-Maker in Newcomb

An impromptu paper-making lesson last weekThe following is an edited and abridged transcript of a recent conversation I had with Emma Lucille Percy, Artist in Residence at the SUNY-ESF Newcomb Campus.  Emma’s 12-week residency is generously sponsored in part by the Adirondack Park Institute and SUNY-ESF and is inspired by a college-wide commitment to strengthen the conversation between science and the arts and humanities.

There is still time to register for Emma’s final bookbinding workshop of the season at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb, NY. This all-levels workshop is free and open to the public. Call (518) 582-2000 or email aic@esf.edu to register. To learn more about Emma’s work, click here. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 19, 2017

‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Screening, Discussion In Saranac Lake

I am not your negroJohn Brown Lives! in partnership with Lake Flower Landing will host a screening of the documentary I Am Not Your Negro on Thursday, August 24, 2017, in Saranac Lake.

A film for these times, Raoul Peck’s award-winning documentary on writer James Baldwin draws inspiration from Baldwin’s final but unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, and the narrative relies almost exclusively on his writings, read by Samuel L. Jackson. Documentary footage of police violence against Black people in the 1960s is juxtaposed against shots of similar violence today.

The screening will be followed by an open-ended conversation with novelist Russell Banks, Nell Painter, Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, Princeton University, and David Goodman whose brother Andrew Goodman was one of three young Civil Rights activists murdered in Mississippi, during Freedom Summer in 1964, by members of the Ku Klux Klan. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 18, 2017

Louis Marshall: Wilderness Conservationist; Seeker of Social Justice

Louis Marshall Wilderness preservationist Louis Marshall would have not only commented about the extremism, murder and related tragic loss of life in Charlottesville, VA. He would have been outspoken against the Ku Klux Klan and Neo-Nazi followers that caused it. Further, he would have responded vigorously and explicitly against President Trump’s persistent equivocation about who caused the violence and loss of life. To the lawyer and civil rights advocate Louis Marshall, love of justice and love of nature bubbled up from the same headwaters.

We continue to live in a time of specialists where our humanity is defined and constrained as lanes we live and practice within. The messages we receive daily are to stay in our separate lanes, interests and specialties. By dint of his and world history and by force of personality, Louis Marshall (1856-1929) would not stay in any lane. Nor did Martin Luther King. Nor do young people today. Nor should any of us. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 18, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week

» Continue Reading.


Page 1 of 63312345...102030...Last »