Thursday, March 23, 2017

Lessons From Standing Rock in Keene March 30th

Sacred Circle at Standing Rock protest siteSeveral speakers with direct experience in the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s and Water Protectors’ efforts to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline Project over the past year will present their personal stories in an open community dialogue event next Thursday, March 30th at the Keene Valley Congregational Church. The public is encouraged to attend.

From 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm, presentations will begin in the sanctuary space with speakers presenting their experience and perspectives of the Standing Rock movement.  Presenters include Katie Wilson, Tom Smith, Nicky Frechette and Dan Plumley – veterans and activists on the Standing Rock issue from Keene.  Mohawk traditional elder and teacher Alan Brant from Ontario, Canada will be attending and will help open the event as well as offer his indigenous perspective on this new era of Standing Rock awareness. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Adirondack Foxes Are Active in Late Winter

foxesThe first time I saw the fox last February, I did a double take. It was late morning when I glanced out the window on my way from one task to the next. The unexpected flash of red made me stop and forget about the morning’s to-do list.

I watched for several minutes as the fox trotted around boulders and past old apple trees. Every now and then it paused and cocked its head before continuing on a meandering path through the stubbly field. This would be the first of many sightings over the next several weeks. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Herbal Remedies: Ancient Medicines, Modern Uses

herbal medicineBy late-March it starts to feel as though winter is the only time of year not in a hurry to get somewhere. By comparison, every other season seems to go by with a Doppler-type velocity like an Indy car blurring past. But I realize that any day now, spring could get sprung, and when that happens, plant life will change by the day, if not the hour. Some of the first plants to catch my eye are ones which have historically been used to treat coughs and colds. Good timing, I’d say.

Herbal remedies have been part of human culture since the day culture got invented. No matter where our early ancestors settled, they exploited regional plants for medicinal as well as culinary value. In a sense, unknown plants served as an evolutionary pressure, except they selected against bad luck, and perhaps gullibility, and likely didn’t help the human genome a lot. As knowledge of plant medicine accrued, it was refined, committed to memory and passed along — first orally and later in writing — from one generation to the next. Ancient healers had to know the properties of a given plant, what it might interact with, and how to tell it from similar species. This of course helped protect them from the wrath of disgruntled patients, not to mention early malpractice suits. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

DEC: 2016 Was Safest Year On Record for Hunters

The State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that the 2016 hunting season in New York had only 13 hunting-related shooting incidents, the lowest number on record since DEC began compiling hunting-related shooting statistics in 1958.

Of the 13 hunting-related shooting incidents in 2016, seven incidents were self-inflicted and six incidents involved more than one person. In 2015, there were 23 incidents. In 1966, there were 166 incidents, 13 of which were fatal. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

‘Bluestockings’ Once Battled for Women’s Rights

Women’s history month (March) is a reminder of the struggles they have endured for equality and fair treatment. Unity is important in any movement, but in the North Country, women were often on opposing sides in the battle for equal rights. The region’s rural nature had much to do with that division, as did the population’s roots: mountain folk, farmers, and miners were primarily immigrants (many via Quebec) from European countries that were overwhelmingly Catholic or Protestant.

Resistance to change was organized by branding the opposition as silly and simultaneously ungodly. For more than a century in the United States, those promoting women’s rights were labeled Bluestockings, a term that has been used both in a complimentary and a pejorative sense.

Its origins are nebulous, but it’s known that in the 1700s, Bluestockings in England were educated women unwilling to settle for being simply an adornment on a man’s arm. They learned languages, engaged in political discussions, and sought to better themselves by gaining certain rights previously enjoyed only by the privileged in society: men.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

5th Annual Lake George Hike-A-Thon Registration Now Open

Photo of the Cook Mountain Preserve hiking group spelling out “LG” at last year’s Hike-A-Thon by Carl Heilman II/Wild Visions (provided).The early-bird registration period is open for the Lake George Land Conservancy’s (LGLC) 5th annual Lake George Hike-A-Thon.

Event organizers are anticipating nearly 750 hikers, paddlers and volunteers. Free t-shirts are given to those who register by April 30; thereafter shirts may be purchased. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

NYS Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guides Available

freshwater fishing guideThe 2017/18 New York State Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guide is now available. Regulations in the guide are in effect from April 1, 2017, through March 31, 2018. Anglers should review a copy of the guide before casting a line after April 1. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 20, 2017

APA, DEC Seek Comments Period on Trail Bridge Construction

A 12-foot wide snowmobile trail bridge constructed in the Moose River Plains in 2012.The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) and the Department of Environmental Conservation are holding a joint public comment period to solicit comments regarding proposed Minimum Requirements Approach Guidance.

The guidance pertains to the construction of trail bridges on State Land classified as Wild Forest Areas in the Adirondack Park.

The APA and DEC will accept comments on the Minimum Requirements Approach Guidance until April 14, 2017. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 20, 2017

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Seminar in Warrensburg

On Saturday, April 8th Cornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County will host a seminar on the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. Mark Whitmore of Cornell University one of the foremost authorities on the Wooly Adelgid will give a one-and-a-half-hour presentation starting at 10 am at the Cooperative Extension Education Center in Warrensburg.

Following his presentation, he will then conduct a field detection workshop at Pack Forest in Warrensburg from 12:30 pm to 2 pm. During that time, Whitmore will detail what to look for and how to distinguish adelgid damage from other tree issues. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 20, 2017

2017 Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors

headlights watercolorView, the multi-media arts center in Old Forge, is seeking artists working in all forms of watermedia for the 2017 Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors.

The Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors is considered one of the top ten watermedia exhibitions in the nation, drawing artists and audiences from all over. Each year artists compete for a chance at over $14,000 in prizes and awards. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 19, 2017

The Origin and Impact of the Adirondack Northway

i87When my parents came to the Adirondacks in 1956, they believed they were moving to a place far removed – culturally and politically as well as geographically – from the cities in which they had worked as left-wing journalists.

Beyond the Adirondacks lay “the big world,” as our neighbor Peggy Hamilton called it. (It was a world she was familiar with, having been the companion of Vida Mulholland and, like Vida and her more famous sister Inez, an early advocate of women’s rights.) » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 19, 2017

Tugboat Shipwreck to Become Underwater Historic Preserve

Steam tug U.S. La ValleeThe 1880 tugboat U.S. La Vallee shipwreck in Lake Champlain will become a Underwater Historic Preserve and will open for divers this summer, thanks to a 2017 Corridor of Commerce Grant from the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership.

The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum (LCMM) plans to use the grant funds to establish the infrastructure that makes it possible for divers to safely visit the wreck site, as well as providing public interpretation of the wreck. The U.S. La Vallee is an example of the small, steam-powered commercial tugs that operated along the east coast and inland waterways of the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

Some Early Research on Climate Change and Soil

climate changeFor many of us, winter in the Northeast means cold temperatures and piles of snow, drifting through forests and across fields. It’s hard to imagine that winter here could be different, but the prospect of climate change has scientists asking just what our winters might look like in the future – and how those changes might influence forest ecology.

At the U.S. Forest Service’s Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, scientists are thinking about the year 2100. How much warming will occur isn’t certain, but some projections suggest that average air temperatures in our region may increase 5.5 to 9 degrees over the course of this century. The effects are likely to be complex and are difficult to predict, with benefits and costs for different organisms. Some tree species, for example, may benefit from longer and warmer growing seasons, but they may also sustain root damage from more frequent soil freezing. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

Adirondack Wildlife: The Star-Nosed Mole

star nosed moleFor many Adirondack residents, the onset of mud season brings about the annual problem of water in the basement. Run-off from melting snow and rain, unable to percolate into the still frozen soil, pools on the ground and eventually drains to the lowest spot available. The foundation of older homes may collect some of this water, as do surface tunnels created by small creatures like moles and voles.

While spring flooding can be a serious survival issue for some subterranean mammals, it is not believed to be of any major concern to the star-nosed mole, one of the least physically attractive forms of wildlife in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 17, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


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