Thursday, November 20, 2014

Report: Educated Young People Flocking To Cities

AtlantisA new report from the City Observatory think tank finds that college educated young people are flocking to metropolitan areas in ever higher numbers.

This report sheds new light on national and Adirondack Park demographic trends. Titled The Young and Restless and the Nation’s Cities, this report draws a number of interesting conclusions. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, November 20, 2014

Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondack Park (Nov 20)

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This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. A narrative version of this report can be found at Mountain Lake PBS.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.



Thursday, November 20, 2014

Tick Talk: Lyme Disease in the Adirondack Park

#3 - HarringtonTicks carrying Lyme Disease are in the Adirondacks. Join The Wild Center and Paul Smith’s College at 1 pm on Saturday, December 6th, for a forum on Lyme Disease featuring five regional scientists and health professionals who will share their professional knowledge and expertise.

The presenters will include Brian Leydet from Trudeau Institute, Jennifer Gallagher from High Peaks Animal Hospital, Jonathan Krant from Adirondack Health, Tim Sellati from Trudeau Institute and David Patrick from the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, November 20, 2014

Upper Hudson Valley Watercolor Society Exhibit

by Jim O'TooleThe Upper Hudson Valley Watercolor Society’s Members Exhibit will be on display at Tannery Pond’s Widlund Gallery in North Creek from November 22 through January 4, 2015.

The exhibit includes new work by the group which consists of artists of all abilities from the Adirondacks and surrounding region, working in watercolor, gouache, acrylic, or other forms of watermedia. This exhibit showcases the talent and creativity of our regional watercolor artists; many pieces will be available to purchase.
» Continue Reading.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Spruce Grouse: Help For A Rare Bird

Adult GrouseOnce abundant in the Adirondacks, the spruce grouse has struggled for much of the past century, but now scientists are trying to bolster the dwindling population by importing birds from out of state.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation released three spruce grouse last year and thirty this year, according to Angelena Ross, a biologist with the department.

The three birds released last year were adult females from Ontario. Only one survived the winter, and it was killed by a hawk in the spring.

In August, DEC released twelve adults and eighteen juveniles captured in Maine at three sites in the Adirondacks— two on private land, one in the Forest Preserve— near Tupper Lake and Paul Smiths. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Herb Clark, Marshalls 100th Anniv Events Being Planned

Bob Marshall and his guide Herb ClarkPreparations by the Adirondack Forty-Sixers are underway to recognize Herb Clark, and Bob and George Marshall’s first climb of Whiteface Mountain (their first High Peak) in 1918 with a 100th anniversary celebration planned for August 3- 5, 2018. On Saturday August 4th, hikers (encouraged to wear period dress and gear) will summit of all forty-six High Peaks at the same time.

Preliminary plans also include a night of Adirondack films outside in Saranac Lake, a barbeque, and a celebration at Whiteface Mountain, plus more is in the works.  Throughout the weekend, the Saranac Lake Free Library will highlight their George Marshall collection. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Adirondack Landowners Meeting In Old Forge

Adirondack Landowners AssociationThe Adirondack Landowners Association (ALA) will host its annual Winter Membership Meeting on December 5th and 6th at the Adirondack League Club in Old Forge.

This year’s meeting will feature a special presentation of the ALA Stewardship Award to NYS Senator Betty Little.  Friday night activities will include a social reception, dinner, additional tributes and a live and silent auction.  On Saturday morning a member meeting will feature a presentation by NYS DEC Senior Wildlife Biologist Paul Jensen on the department’s Pine Marten program.

The ALA was founded to “encourage continued stewardship and sound resource management of the land; to promote public awareness of the valuable role played by private landowners in the Park; to advocate laws, regulations and governmental policies that promote and facilitate good stewardship by private landowners and recognize and preserve their rights in the land.” » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Black Friday: Christmas On Main Street

OldForgeChristmas_newPersonally I feel that all decorations have their time and place. Just because chain stores decided on Christmas merchandising before my kids had even pulled together Halloween costumes, does not mean I have to succumb. I need some distance between my holiday celebrations. Christmas won’t happen in our house until the turkey is considered a leftover.

Around the Adirondacks local stores and businesses aren’t feeling the pressure to celebrate early. They are saving their energy and pulling out all the stops for a Black Friday weekend that is uniquely Adirondack. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, November 18, 2014

State Land Plan: A Conversation with Peter Paine

Peter Paine with hunting companionThe APA’s “Listening Sessions” about the State Land Master Plan (SLMP) conclude this month. I’ve been to several on behalf of Adirondack Wild and appreciate the low-key, helpful competency displayed by the APA staff that receive inputs, write down comments, and field questions from the public in a one-on-one style. While absent of confident, inspired opening statements by the APA about the origins, importance and relevance of the Master Plan which they are by law obliged to uphold, these sessions do foster thoughtful, private questions, comments and enhanced listening, all of which are a good thing.

At Adirondack Wild, however, we see opportunities for strengthening the SLMP and its paramount purposes – the protection of natural resources and wild character of the Forest Preserve – and that’s been the theme behind our inputs to APA. To prepare ourselves, one of the first people we wanted to sit down with was the principal author of the SLMP, Peter S. Paine, Jr. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The End of Adirondack Horse Thief Alonzo Clark

B1LonClarkHdlineAfter release from prison, Alonzo Clark returned to New York and married a young girl in Brandon, south of Malone, where he worked as a farmhand. It wasn’t long before he returned to crime, stealing horses prior to engaging in a high-profile scam at Helena, a hamlet in northern St. Lawrence County. In early 1885, posing as a salesman and tinware repairman, Clark ingratiated himself to Adam Knapp, 69, and his wife, Susan, 50, claiming to be a cousin of Luella, their adopted 16-year-old daughter.

After several nights of reading from the Bible with the family and turning on the charm, Alonzo won them over, particularly Luella. He courted her for several days, using Adam Knapp’s own horse and cutter to woo her on country rides. Within about two weeks’ time, they married. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, November 18, 2014

State Land Master Plan Meeting Rescheduled

comments board for webBecause of snow in the forecast, the Adirondack Park Agency has canceled tonight’s meeting in Old Forge on proposed amendments to the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan.

The meeting has been rescheduled for 4-6 p.m. Monday at the gymnasium in the Town of Webb School on Route 28 in Old Forge.

The APA is considering two changes to the master plan. One would permit mountain biking in the Essex Chain Primitive Area, and the other would allow the state to build a snowmobile bridge over the Cedar River using some non-natural materials.

In addition, the agency is soliciting ideas for other amendments to the plan. The Adirondack Park Local Government Review Board has set forth nine proposals.

» Continue Reading.



Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Garry Trudeau Winter Carnival Artwork on Display

Original Artwork by Garry TrudeauThe artwork of Garry Trudeau, award-winning author of the “Doonesbury” cartoon, is now on display at the Adirondack Medical Center, a member of Adirondack Health, for enjoyment by the community.  This rare collection contains original artwork that Garry Trudeau created in designing some of the earlier Saranac Lake Winter Carnival buttons.

Trudeau, who was raised in Saranac Lake, has been creating the button design since 1981, as well as a poster design since 2012, to benefit the Winter Carnival.  Winter Carnival buttons are one of the longest-running traditions at the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival and have a devoted following of collectors and those who enjoy capturing a piece of the event’s history.  » Continue Reading.



Monday, November 17, 2014

DEC Misinformed Public In Rail-Trail Slide Show

Bog RiverAt recent meetings on the Remsen-Lake Placid rail corridor, the state misinformed the public about the legal implications of removing tracks that cross rivers between Big Moose and Tupper Lake.

The public was told that the state’s Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers Act would prohibit the state from restoring the railroad tracks between Big Moose and Tupper Lake if they were removed.

In a slide show, the state Department of Environmental Conservation noted that railroad bridges generally are not permitted over rivers classified as Wild or Scenic. It said the railroad crosses three such rivers south of Tupper Lake: the Moose, Bog, and Raquette. » Continue Reading.



Monday, November 17, 2014

Sandy Hidreth On Becoming An Art Collector

bernsteinsm2014A few years ago, during the annual Artist at Work Studio Tour, I had a family from Long Lake come to visit my studio. Mom, Dad, and if I remember correctly, “Lily”, who must have been around 8-9 years old. They looked, we chatted, and then the Mom offered Lily the opportunity to pick out a small piece of art that she would like! I was truly astounded – parents offering to let a child purchase art! What a wonderful way to cultivate a life-long love and respect for original, hand-made items. I was very honored to have been a part of that.

Well, it’s now that time of year when we (the artists) hope that you (the readers) get in the gift giving spirit and consider enriching lives by making presents of art. But as I sit on duty at the Adirondack Artists Guild Gallery in Saranac Lake and watch people browse, I began to reflect on what it might mean to “collect art” and how that impacts daily lives of both the buyers and the sellers. » Continue Reading.



Monday, November 17, 2014

Adirondack Wildlife: Wayfaring Porcupines

Porcupine by Mary Harrsch (Wikicommons)Big game hunters and auto body repair shops know well that early to mid November is the time in the Adirondacks when deer are on the move; however the white-tail is not the only creature that breeds during late autumn.

The porcupine also develops its urge to reproduce in the period between Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving. As is the case with deer, older male porcupines are currently on the move in their attempt to locate as many females nearing their estrous period as possible over these next several weeks.

Unlike the beaver and red and gray fox which establish a pair bond with only one individual, the porcupine, like most mammals attempts to breed with as many members of the opposite sex as time and opportunity allow. As she becomes receptive, a female engages in a courtship ritual with any older and larger male that happens to encounter her. If the male were to depart shortly after breeding, she may elect to mate again if another suitor were to arrive while her hormones still influenced her behavior. This is why a male typically remains in the immediate area after breeding so as to attack and fend off any male attracted to the smell of her scent. This helps ensure that only his genetic material goes into the fertilization of her egg, perpetuating his blood line. After the female loses her desire to breed, the male quickly abandons her and continues his travels to search for additional females in need of a mating partner. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, November 16, 2014

State Land Master Plan: Managing for the 21st Century

APSLMP - LogoFriday, I concluded a four-part history of the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan: why it was written, how it has been applied, and why it has been updated. Together, I think the four essays provide a good overview of most of the key events that influenced the original plan and its two revisions, from the point at which the Forest Preserve was created in 1885, to how we arrived at the master plan that we have today. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, November 16, 2014

A Solitary Runner in the Adirondack Park

downhill_hurricane_rdMore or less around this time, three years ago, I started to train for the 2012 Boston Marathon. Something like 117 degrees on the pavement, 95 or so ambient temp, that race was one of the hottest on record. It was the year before the dreadful bombing. And it took me practically six hours to complete. (I had trained to do it in four and a half.) Needless to say, I run slow and steady. Notwithstanding the suffocating heat of April 2012, I run a 10-minute mile—no matter what. When I think I’m sprinting: 10-minute mile. When I feel like I’m dragging: 10-minute mile. When I’m just perfect, trouncing along at a comfortable clip with a wacky spring in my step, dancing hands, and a bobbing head: 10-minute mile.

I enjoy the leisurely pace, most often because I run through rural landscapes, soaking in their (to me) intrinsic and needed sublimity while also stepping up and down and up and down into quickening challenges. Also, because I have very little drive for social, human-to-human competition. I compete only with myself or the raven croaking overhead, with how far that next tree or bend in the road or rocky outcropping appears on the horizon. Overcrowded, organized races are an anomaly for me, typically run because my brother asked me to or because I feel the notorious tug of the “I ought to’s” as part of a community or simply because I could bring a free beer back for my husband! I’m a self-described recluse (albeit along with said husband and three dogs); I choose solitude over socializing, introspection over conversation. Thus I choose to run… alone. » Continue Reading.



Saturday, November 15, 2014

Lorraine Duvall: A Trip To The Essex Chain Lakes

Lorraine & culvert--Photo by Jeri WrightI had been pining to experience the waters of the Essex Chain Lakes ever since hearing of the purchase by the Nature Conservancy in 2007. But now that the Lakes are open to the public seven years later my ability to carry a boat, even a lightweight Hornbeck solo canoe, is limited. I could have done it at the age of 68, but not 75. I wanted to do it with my canoe buddies, who were even older than me, ranging in age from their late seventies to ninety.

We are a group of six women from the High Peaks region who like to independently explore the wild waters in our solo boats. Our paddling explorations began 11 years ago during a camping trip on Little Tupper Lake, returning the last day during a hurricane. Every year since we’ve scheduled trips around hip and knee replacements and family caretaking duties – ranging from three day camping excursions on Lows Lake and Lake Lila to one day trips on Henderson Lake to an afternoon on Lake Everest in Wilmington. » Continue Reading.



Saturday, November 15, 2014

Amy Godine On Black History in the Adirondacks

TMDA LogoBlack history in the Adirondacks has an anecdotal quality, maybe because the numbers of black Adirondackers have been so few. Here’s a story of a black homesteader who was good friends with John Brown. There’s a barn that may have sheltered fugitives on the Underground Railroad.  Outside Warrensburg is a place in the woods where a black hermit lived. And so on.

The temptation – and I should know; I’ve been a lead offender – is to make a sort of nosegay out of these scattered stories, pack them all into a story by its lonesome, a chunky little sidebar, and let this stand for the black experience.

It makes a good read, and it’s efficient. And it’s wrong. It reinforces the idea that the black experience in this region was something isolated, inessential. It ghettoizes black Adirondack history, and this wasn’t how it was. » Continue Reading.



Friday, November 14, 2014

Out Of The Woodlot: Meet The Lumbersexual

paul22newIt’s fitting that I just finished bringing in the wood for the season and had plopped down into my old wooden chair when I learned I was well attired for the latest fashion craze.

Apparently, according to Gear Junkie, your standard Adirondack men’s wear – work pants, a flannel, an unkept beard  – is a thing. Like a cool thing. With fashionistas and all.

Move on metrosexual, clear the way for the lumbersexual:

Today, the metrosexual is a disappearing breed being quickly replaced by men more concerned with existing in the outdoors, or the pseudo-outdoors, than meticulous grooming habits.

He is bar-hopping, but he looks like he could fell a Norway Pine. » Continue Reading.



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