Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Hamlets to Huts Receives Grant, Long Lake Spur Progressing

hamlets to huts logoThe nonprofit Adirondack Hamlets to Huts, Inc. (AHH) has received a $20,000 grant from The Cloudsplitter Foundation of Saranac Lake. The gift is expected to help AHH improve and operate the Adirondack Hamlets to Huts Trails Center located on Main Street in Saranac Lake, and also help implement and market its first hut-to-hut route — the North Creek Indian Lake Circuit.

The Adirondack Hamlets to Huts Trails Center provides information to visitors about the hut-to-hut initiative, where to hike, bike and paddle in the Adirondacks, and how to travel and camp safely in the Adirondack backcountry. The Trails Center also sells gifts, clothing, and select “Ten Essentials” items for day-hiking. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Farm 2 Fork Festival Returns with ‘Adirondack Cookout’

The 2017 Farm 2 Fork Festival will be held at the Riverside Park in Saranac Lake on Saturday, September 2nd. This year’s theme is Adirondack Cookout. The menu includes grilled Mace Chasm sausage, vegetable lasagna, Dak & Dill Pickles, salsa, coleslaw, garlic and herb roasted potatoes, and apple crisp.

The inaugural Heirloom Award will be handed out at the festival, honoring a local person that goes above and beyond to support local farmers and local food. The first recipient will be Farm 2 Fork Festival founder Gail Brill of Saranac Lake. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

New Tupper Lake Regional Marketing Manager Named

Tupper Lake LogoThe Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has announced the promotion of Katie Stuart to the position of Tupper Lake Regional Marketing Manager.

In her new role, Stuart is expected to serve as a liaison between community stakeholders, travelers, and ROOST, and supports the implementation of marketing strategies for the Tupper Lake area. She was introduced to destination marketing via an internship at ROOST during the summer of 2015, and after graduating from Keuka College in 2017, joined ROOST full time as Tupper Lake/Hamilton County Marketing Assistant. She now fills the role formerly held by Michelle Clement, who was promoted to ROOST Director of Marketing in July. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

8 Adirondack Search And Rescue Incidents In 6 Days

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Stuntman Ken Carter’s Not So Grand Finale

The weather was clear and cool on Wednesday, September 26, 1979, the day of the big jump. Reporters, film crews, and spectators were on hand. Ken Carter showed up driving a red Chevrolet, certainly not his jump car, and obligingly drove up the ramp a couple of times so that photographers could get some good shots. He posed, looking out over the St. Lawrence for dramatic effect. A bit later, he walked partway up the ramp and made note of a “slight rise” in the middle that would have to be fixed before his rocket car could be used on it. Several thousand people remained on hand for ten hours, anxious to view what they considered a historic, and certainly wacky, event.

Late in the afternoon, the gate at the apex of the ramp was removed, divers were positioned in the middle of the river passage, and a film crew hovered aloft in a helicopter. Ontario police moved the crowd back to a safe position. To great effect, Carter’s rocket car rolled onto the newly paved runway (resurfaced because it had become overgrown with grass). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Improvements Made at Meacham Lake Campground

meacham lake campgroundThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced improvements to the Meacham Lake Campground in the Adirondack town of Duane, Franklin County, under the State’s Adventure NY initiative to connect more New Yorkers with nature. The improvements, supported by a $1.2 million state investment, include a new accessible boat launch on the eastern shore of Meacham Lake, a parking area, and green infrastructure features.

The boat launch project includes a concrete ramp with floating docks designed for use by people with disabilities; 21 parking spaces for vehicles and boat trailers – including one parking space reserved for people with disabilities; an information kiosk; and landscaping with native plants. The parking lot includes gravel pretreatment filters, a bio retention area and an underground infiltration gallery to manage stormwater. The roadway through the campground to the boat launch was repaved.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Devil’s Shoelace: Doddering Assailants

Devil's Shoelace, Considering the climate where the personification of evil is alleged to make his home, you’d think the devil would wear flip-flops or something, but it seems he prefers lace-up footwear (Prada, I’m told). “Devil’s shoelaces” is one name applied to dodder (Cuscuta spp.), a parasitic plant that looks more like creepy yellow-orange spaghetti than a plant. Dodder is known by a whole slew of unflattering titles including wizard’s net, strangleweed, witch’s hair, and hellbine. As these names suggest, dodder has earned itself quite a sinister reputation, which is no big surprise, since parasites generally inspire collywobbles, not cuddles.

But the leafless, ghostly pale, tentacle-like dodder really ramps up the squirm factor. Research has shown it is able to recognize which plants are around it by sniffing them out. Every plant gives off a unique blend of compounds such as terpenes and esters, making it easy to tell cilantro from tomatoes with just one whiff. Not only can dodder distinguish one plant from another, it can sense which is more nutritious, and will move toward that one with great precision, and attack it. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Raquette River Dams Program: Catamount Lodge to Carry Falls Reservoir

Guided walk with Mary JaneTAUNY (Traditional Arts in Upstate New York) will host a guided woods walk from Catamount Lodge to the Carry Falls Reservoir with Ruth McWilliams of Catamount Lodge and Mary Jane Watson of South Colton on Thursday, August 17th from 9:30 am to 12:30 pm.

Along the way, visitors will have the chance to learn about the natural life of the area as well as the hydroelectric power project that transformed the Raquette River in the 1950s and beyond, creating Carry Falls Reservoir and other now familiar lakes around Colton. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Ancient Jefferson Co Pottery Reveals 16th Century Iroquoia

northern iroquoia groups A study published in the journal Science Advances demonstrates how decorations on ancient pottery can be used to discover new evidence for how groups interacted across large regions. The research, conducted by John P. Hart, Director of Research and Collections at the New York State Museum; Jennifer Birch, Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia; and Christian Gates St-Pierre, Assistant Professor at the University of Montreal, sheds new light on the importance of a little-understood Iroquoian population in upstate New York and its impact on relations between two emerging Native American political powers in the 16th century.

Iroquoians in northeastern North America are best known for the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) and Wendat (Huron) confederacies in upstate New York and southern Ontario. There are extensive early historic records of both groups. Descendants of these confederacies and their respective nations that remain in these areas today have rich oral traditions that speak to their histories before and after European contact. Archaeology fills out these records through the excavation and analyses of ancestral communities. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Forest Landowners Take Note Of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

hemlock woolly adelgidEastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis) are one of the most beautiful conifers found in northern New York forests. It can take up to 300 years for them to reach mature heights of up to 70 feet and diameters of up to 3-feet. They commonly live for 500 years and can live for 800 years or longer. Many are among the oldest trees in the state.

In their northern range, they’re found at a variety of elevations (sea level to near 5000 ft.) and on a multiplicity of sites (hillsides, valleys, shorelines, glacial ridges). Hemlocks are commonly found growing in mixed stands, with yellow birch, sugar maple, northern red oak, white ash, American beech, and white pine and can be distinguished from pine and by their short, flat needles. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Creative Economy Event Planned For Saranac Lake

philip morrisThe Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) and Traditional Arts in Upstate New York (TAUNY) have partnered to bring creative thinkers and planners together to discuss how the creative economy can invigorate North Country downtowns.

The presentation, “The Creative Economy: Re-imagining Our Rural Downtowns,” will take place at the historic Harrietstown Town Hall in Saranac Lake on Tuesday, August 22 at 7 pm. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

Throughout rural America a strong cultural sector helps create economic opportunity. The experiences of regional revitalization, including Philip Morris of Proctors theater in Schenectady, will be the focus of the presentation and roundtable discussion.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Brown’s Raid 1777 Battle Re-enactment Weekend

Brown’s Raid 1777 Battle Re-enactmentFort Ticonderoga will host a two-day battle re-enactment highlighting the 1777 Brown’s Raid on Ticonderoga on Saturday and Sunday, September 9-10, from 9:30 am to 5 pm.

Programming throughout the weekend will highlight the American raid on Ticonderoga in their attempt to recapture the fort. Visitors will have the chance to learn about the Royal Navy’s role in the attack and experience the battle from a completely new angle on Lake Champlain aboard tour boat, Carillon. Atop Mount Defiance, learn about the guard of Rangers who had attacked British-held Fort Ticonderoga with their own cannon. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 13, 2017

Longest Adirondack Accessible Trail Being Built in Willsboro

trail builder Ama Koenigsh on the first day Tahawus Trails LLC began work on the new universal access trail at the Conservancy’s Boquet River Nature Preserve The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter is making upgrades to its Boquet River Nature Preserve trail network in the town of Willsboro. This summer, professional trail builders have been constructing a 1.5-mile loop trail in the uplands portion of the 110-acre preserve. When completed, this multi-use trail is expected to be the longest accessible forest trail in the region designed and built to meet the Federal Trail Accessibility Guidelines under the Architectural Barriers Act.

The new trail will have a minimal slope and a crushed stone surface that can accommodate walkers, runners, bikers, strollers, and wheelchairs. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 13, 2017

New Adirondack Research On Invasive Phragmites

Lake Placid Wetland - Phragmites Management TimelapsePractitioners from the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) and researchers from Cornell University published the results of a seven-year study evaluating management of Phragmites australis (Phragmites), an aggressive wetland invasive plant, in the Adirondacks.

Published in the latest issue of Biological Invasions, “Management of invasive Phragmites australis in the Adirondacks: a cautionary tale about prospects of eradication,” documents broad success in controlling the species and suggests that over 70% of infestations within the interior Adirondacks will eventually be successfully eradicated, allowing native species to recolonize.

Since 2010, APIPP has managed 334 infestations of Phragmites in the interior Adirondacks. As of 2016, 212 of these managed sites have been documented as Phragmites-free; 104 have been documented as Phragmites-free for three consecutive years and are deemed eradicated. Researchers point to two primary reasons for this success: Small size of Phragmites infestations upon discovery (average size is less than one acre); and APIPP’s sustained early detection, rapid response, and monitoring efforts. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 12, 2017

Adirondack Dog-Strangling Vine

swallow-wortThis summer, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has come through with a new hope for the forces of good. Its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has opened a public comment period, ending on August 14, 2017, relating to the release of a non-native insect to control swallow-wort.

Sometimes called “dog-strangling vine,” this invasive plant from Eurasia doesn’t harm pets, but it does live up to its name as a strangler. There are two species of the perennial vine, and they are both adept at choking out wildflowers, forest seedlings, Christmas tree plantations, hay fields and other habitats. In the Eastern Lake Ontario region, it has proved capable of blanketing large tracts, hundreds of acres in some cases, to create permanent monocultures of tangled, toxic foliage. » Continue Reading.


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