Monday, November 14, 2016

Saranac Lake Transgender Day of Remembrance Planned

adk diversity advisory council logoTransgender Day of Remembrance is an annual way to memorialize those who have died or were murdered as a result of transphobia, the hatred or fear of transgender and gender non-conforming people. Transgender Day of Remembrance serves to bring attention to the continued violence endured by the transgender community.

A Transgender Day of Remembrance observance will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 from 5 to 6 pm at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 136 Main Street, in Saranac Lake.

This non-denominational event is co-hosted by the Adirondack Unitarian Universalist Community, First Presbyterian Church and St. Luke’s Episcopal Church of Saranac Lake, and the Adirondack North Country Gender Alliance.


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31 Responses

  1. Rob Gdyk says:

    Only goes to show how low the Presbyterian and Episcopal Churches have sunk to and the consequences are evident in a culture which is spinning out of control.

  2. Charlie S says:

    Transgender, transsexual… I’ve been thinking! There’s been lots in the news of late about this or that same-sex couple who wish to be married in a barn or church and whose wishes were rejected because of the beliefs by those who own the barn or who preside over the church. And so these same sex couples take it upon themselves to make public a supposed bias or rejection or whatever their beef is instead of just walking away and finding another barn or church who will accept their way of life. Because of this the political pot is stirred and they cause more poop than they realize…and look what just happened in this last election – a bigot is chosen to lead the flock. This is no coincidence.

    So you like the same sex as you! So you wish to come out of the closet! So you feel proud to be who you are! Why is there this strong desire to let the world know? And why stir up the pot? There’s people in this country who are genuine at heart and who have different beliefs than you,people whose beliefs I am not necessarily in harmony with but feel strongly they have a right to express and stand firm with. Why agitate them just because of whatever? It don’t make sense to me. Especially in these times of political and social turmoil. Be who you are but know that it’s not all about you…respect others beliefs! You’re working against yourselves when you try to impose your standards upon everyone else who may not necessarily agree with you. I’m just saying!

    • terry says:

      Appeasement to the hate filled. No thank you Mr Chamberlian

    • roamin with broman says:

      AGREE: “Why is there this strong desire to let the world know?”

      True about this and many other things. Live your life, but leave me alone.

    • Scott van Laer scottvanlaer says:

      Why complain when you can’t sit at the same lunch counter as whites because you are black? Why not just find a different diner that will let you sit at their counter. Why agitate the poor business owner who just thinks you shouldn’t sit at their lunch counter. You are working against yourself. Why impose your standard and belief that you are human being just like me when I don’t think you are. I’m just saying! Sir, I am just saying…you are a disgusting homophobe.

    • John Warren John Warren says:

      Charlie, shame on you.

    • Boreas says:

      In fairness, I do not feel Charlie’s comment was meant to be particularly bigoted, but more in line with a “don’t ask – don’t tell” stance. But history over the last century has shown us that that type of view has its own dangers.

      • John Warren John Warren says:

        Don’t ask, don’t tell was also bigoted. Which is why it’s no longer in effect.

        • Boreas says:

          John,

          I guess our definitions of “bigoted” differ. As I said, DADT carries it’s own problems. Think slavery, Jim Crow, Naziism, glass ceilings, etc., etc.. The list will always expand. One can always choose to look the other way, and that can have grave consequences, but I don’t feel it necessarily makes one a bigot. But that is just my interpretation. I feel there are some shades of gray .

          I grew up in a bigoted family, and hold some “ingrained” bigoted feelings myself. I am not proud of them and I fight these feelings and emotions daily and generally try to push for tolerance. I would assume much of mankind struggles with this as well. People need to step back and minimize the use of labels.

    • Jim S. says:

      How is it that people can have great passion for the natural world but have so little compassion for people that are a bit different?

  3. Scott van Laer scottvanlaer says:

    I have never been more disappointed in the comments I have read on the Almanack before.

    • Jim S. says:

      The polarization we have in this world is shocking. Thank heavens there are groups like these fine religious organizations to try to spread tolerance. A truly great cause.

    • Boreas says:

      Agreed. Especially since they are responses to a simple, non-political memorial announcement. Perhaps given the recent election results, intolerance may have been given a new mandate.

    • terry says:

      Agree and get ready for a four year rainstorm of hate.

  4. Alan Vieters says:

    Ever wonder why so many think we are a bunch of ignorant rednecks here in the Adirondacks? Naked exposed for all to see…This is why

  5. tim-brunswick says:

    Can’t believe you folks are even commenting to the extent you are….obviously this entire story was structured to evoke exactly the kinds of comments/debate I’ve just read…..I’ll pass….in fact I didn’t even read it because I wanted to see the comments and wasn’t surprised at all.

    • John Warren John Warren says:

      The entire story was structured to announce a memorial to the many folks who have been killed, and continued to be the victims of violence.

  6. Charlie S says:

    scottvanlaer says: “Why impose your standard and belief that you are human being just like me when I don’t think you are. I’m just saying! Sir, I am just saying…you are a disgusting homophobe.”

    John Warren says: “Charlie, shame on you.”

    I knew I would be misread by what i wrote. I am far from a ‘disgusting’ homophobe Scott I assure you who do not know me and I am better than that John I assure you! Some of the nicest people I have met are gay! If I was a homophobe I’m smart enough to not let it be known in a public forum. Read what I said closer instead of jumping and concluding it as a biased view.

    I recall one business owner who hit the news because his religious beliefs did not go along with marrying same sex couples in his barn,a business owner “whose beliefs I am not necessarily in harmony with but feel strongly he has a right to express and stand firm with.” (This is the same as respecting those who feel they have a right to bear arms in this country while others want to take those rights away because of their beliefs.) A complaint was filed against him and he closed his business because a same sex couple took it upon themselves to make public a supposed bias or rejection or whatever their insecurities led them to believe instead of just walking away and finding another barn or church who will accept their way of life.”

    I feel it was wrong for that same sex couple to do that which does not mean I am homophobic as some of you misread in my post! Strongly I feel it was wrong!

    • John Warren John Warren says:

      Charlie, you are advocating “separate but equal.” You’re advocating for the same kind of discrimination that inspired the Civil Rights movement. It’s too bad you can’t see it for what it is.

      • Charlie S says:

        I am not advocating anything John! And there is no discrimination in what I have said I am just airing my thoughts on the matter.I am far from biased I assure you for the second time. Maybe I need to readjust my words to make my point clearer but then I thought I was as clear as day.

  7. Charlie S says:

    Boreas says: “I grew up in a bigoted family,…”

    I didn’t realize until much past my teens how bigoted some members of my family really are. I don’t relate to their views and most certainly I don’t feel close to them at all. Their limited views and cold conservative natures have often gone against me for no other reason than that they are small-minded and would rather do battle than to find harmony…. I am sorry to say. There’s no getting through to them they are hopeless at this stage in the game. I am okay with it!

    I visited my hometown some few years ago many years after I had left it. I saw some of the old neighbors who were still living in the same houses and when I got to talking to them their racist views clearly came into view. ‘Nigger’ and ‘liberal’ were some of their favorite words and I played dumb and went along and that was the last I will ever see of them. I feel sorry for people like that..to be stuck in such a small world. I had no idea some of my neighbors were so biased when I was growing up. I guess it took some growing up for me to see it in them.

  8. Charlie S says:

    Jim S. says: “How is it that people can have great passion for the natural world but have so little compassion for people that are a bit different?”

    I know people that cannot get enough of the natural world Jim and at the same time are as prejudiced as David Duke who recently publicly supported our next President. I have met liberals whose views far oppose mine when it comes to the natural world which I have found odd but have also come to understand as ‘we’re all different’ no matter what banners we wave.

  9. Ed says:

    Guess we need a “Straight & I’m Proud of it” day!

  10. Charlie S says:

    Charlie Stehlin says: Charlie S says, “I recall one business owner who hit the news because his religious beliefs did not go along with marrying same sex couples in his barn,a business owner “whose beliefs I am not necessarily in harmony with but feel strongly he has a right to express and stand firm with.”

    If I owned a barn and used said barn as a place of business to permit weddings I would treat gay couples no different than heterosexual couples when it came to using my space for nuptial arrangements. I do not own a barn so cannot prove my allegiance on this matter but let it be known ‘this is where I stand the truth has been spoken in my behalf may a stray missile find its target in me if a falsehood has been uttered on this matter.’

  11. Paul says:

    Yikes! I never would have guessed. We have a far more serious problem than I imagined.

  12. Charlie S says:

    What problem is that Paul? That there’s no censorship on the Almanack and open dialogue about serious topics is taboo?

  13. Charlie S says:

    Which isn’t a bad thing Paul!

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