Almanack Contributor Tracy Ormsbee

Tracy Ormsbee

Tracy Ormsbee is the new publisher of the Adirondack Explorer. When she’s not working – and it’s not black fly season – you can find her outdoors hiking, running, paddle boarding or reading a book on an Adirondack chair somewhere.


Thursday, August 10, 2017

Take Adirondack Explorer With You

The Adirondack Explorer has a new app, optimized for phone and tablet screens, that has everything you love about our bimonthly magazine focusing on the issues important to the Adirondacks.

And now the stories can include videos, additional photos, audio, and links to other stories to help readers gain a better understanding of what’s going on in the Park. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Choosing a Trail Running Shoe

Thinking of taking up trail running? The most important piece of equipment is, of course, your shoes.

Drew Haas, an avid trail runner and manager at the Mountaineer in Keene Valley, went over some options with us for the July/August issue of the Adirondack Explorer — with this caveat: “What works for one doesn’t necessarily work for the next.”

In general, trail-running shoes are more durable and more protective than street-running shoes. Trail shoes should have a protective plate in the forefoot so you don’t feel every rock you land on. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 21, 2017

Trailhead Porta-John Initiative Needs Your Help

New ADA-approved Porta-John and regular one at Cascade trailheadWhere people who are active outdoors in the Adirondack Park go to the bathroom is of concern to all of us. Human waste – and don’t think it doesn’t happen on mountaintops, lakeshores, and any peaceful wooded area — can pollute water bodies and ruin the nature experience for other hikers.

One way to solve the problem is better education about poop etiquette. Bury it or carry it out. Better yet, go before you enter the woods.

The Ausable River Porta-John project is making that easier. Started 10 years ago, it expanded to the High Peaks last year. It now has eleven Porta-Johns at popular locations throughout the region (See map here) and is seeing good results, as in fewer incidences of poop and toilet paper left behind. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 17, 2017

Photo Contest: Show Us Views From Moderate Mountaintops

The Adirondack Explorer‘s next “Views of the Park” photo contest is focusing on everyone’s favorite type of photo: from the summit of a mountaintop.

And in light of the ongoing problem of overcrowding in the high peaks region, we’re asking you to post photos from the mountains you’ve hiked that are “Under 4,000” feet, or outside the forty-six high peaks.

Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

A Call For Citizen Scientists To Remove Asian Clams In Sandy Bay

Citizen Scientists participating in the Lake George Association's first Asian Clam Citizen Science Day.Last year, 475 Asian clams — a small clam, less than 1.5 inches in size, that can spread rapidly — were removed from Lake George, thanks to a half day of work from about 20 volunteers as part of the Lake George Association’s Asian Clam Citizen Science Day in Sandy Bay.

The association hopes for a similar result this year from 10 am to 1 pm Monday July 10 when it holds its second Asian Clam Citizen Science Day as part of New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9 through 15. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Wild Center Adds 34 Acres from the Adirondack Club and Resort

The Adirondack Club and Resort (ACR) planned for Tupper Lake donated 34 acres of land to the Wild Center in celebration of the Hull family, it was announced Monday. The land includes the oxbow on the Raquette River where the natural history museum holds canoe and stand-up paddleboard trips in the summer. The gift expands the Wild Center campus to 115 acres.

“The Hull Family loved the Adirondacks, and more than anything wanted to encourage people from across New York and the country to come and see this incredible natural beauty. That’s the same thing the Wild Center has tried to capture, which is why we are honored to make this donation today,” ACR developer Tom Lawson said in a press release.

The Hull family were leaders of the Oval Wood Dish Corporation, which moved to Tupper Lake in 1915. William Cary Hull donated the land and helped found the Tupper Lake Country Club. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Do Your Part For Pollinators

HummingbirdPollinator Week may be over, but efforts continue to educate on the global and regional importance of pollinators and to show people what they can do to help.

Events will be going on throughout the summer to educate the public, including lectures by Dr. Christina Grozinger, Director of Penn State University’s Center for Pollinator Research, July 19 at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake and July 20 at View Arts in Old Forge; showings of the film “More Than Honey” about why bees are facing extinction; gardening and beekeeping workshops and opportunities for learning to identify and monitor pollinators. See a calendar of events here. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 30, 2017

Effort To Find Pollution Impacting Million Dollar Beach Expands

Add The Fund for Lake George and its Lake George Waterkeeper program to the list of groups working diligently to discover what may be causing E.coli to show up in water testing at Million Dollar Beach. The beach — as of Thursday — is open, though water testing by DEC continues daily.

The Fund was invited to its first meeting about the problem last week and signed on to provide technical leadership, “expertise and advice,” said Chris Navitsky, Lake George Waterkeeper and a licensed engineer. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

E.coli Testing Continues At Reopened Million Dollar Beach

Million Dollar Beach reopened again Saturday, June 24, after E.coli tested at a level safe for swimming, according to a DEC press release that also said if the levels rise again, signs will be posted at the beach letting swimmers know of a closure. Daily sampling of the water will continue.

The town, village, DEC and a number of other local organizations concerned with the lake water continue to try to identify a possible source of E.coli affecting the beach.

Patrick Dowd, director of communication for the Lake George Association, said the agencies have had some success eliminating potential sources. For instance, dye-testing was completed on some of the main lines on the east side of the lake on Beedy Road, Rose Point Lane and Front Street. The town and village also used a closed circuit camera to rule out breaks and cracks in storm and sanitary lines and approved a contract to continue the testing of more lines. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Lake George ‘Million Dollar Beach’ Closed Again by E coli

Lake George Village from Prospect Mountain courtesy Diane Chase of Adirondack Family Time. After several false starts this season, Million Dollar Beach in Lake George is closed again — just two weeks from the Fourth of July holiday — as a number of concerned towns and agencies run tests to determine the source of E. coli in the lake.

“This is an unprecedented occurrence on our lake that demands a swift response,” said Lake George Mayor Robert Blais in a news release from the state Department of Environmental Conservation. “The Village of Lake George has committed all available staff and resources and is working closely with DEC to resolve the problem and protect our beautiful lake.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 18, 2017

Spur Trail Demonstrates Hut-to-Hut Possibilities

Hamlet to Hut demonstration project in Long LakeThe Adirondack Community-based Trails and Lodging System Tuesday advanced its “demonstration project” to build a spur trail in the Town of Long Lake offering hikers on the Northville Placid Trail the opportunity to get off the trail and go into the town for a hot shower, meal, and place to sleep for the night. Leaders of the project visited the potential site.

They hope to have the trail finished by fall and ready for use next year. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 16, 2017

A New Nonprofit Is Born: Adirondack Hamlets To Huts

Hamlet-to-hut demonstration project in Long LakeThe Adirondack Hamlets to Huts project, which incorporated in November, received its 501c3 status in April, making it an official nonprofit, Joe Dadey announced at the Adirondack Community-based Trails and Lodging System advisory committee meeting Tuesday. The organization’s mission is to create, manage and promote a world-class Adirondack hut-to-hut system that advances sustainable communities, conservation, and wellness.

This opens up new grant opportunities for the project, and once a website is developed and the group is registered with the New York Charities Bureau, it can begin reaching out for memberships, gifts and donations, Dadey said.

“It will help us advance our mission,” he said. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Hotel Saranac Listed Among Historic Hotels of America

The Hotel Saranac, which first opened its doors in 1927, has been recognized by the Historic Hotels of America, an official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. It is one of 295 hotels listed.

In order to be recognized by Historic Hotels of America, a hotel must be more than 50 years old and have “faithfully maintained their authenticity, sense of place, and architectural integrity.” The hotel is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 6, 2017

For Your Adirondack Calendars

APA Building in Ray Brook NYMark your calendar with these upcoming events, public meetings and next steps in ongoing Adirondack issues.

    • June 8-9: Have something to share with the Adirondack Park Agency? The next APA meeting is 9 am June 8-9 at the agency headquarters in Ray Brook. Check the agenda here. Public comment periods are at the beginning of the meeting on Thursday and again at the end on Friday.
    • June 16 : This is the public comment deadline for the following:

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 4, 2017

First Adirondack Hut-To-Hut Route Slated For 2018

Rafting would be part of the North Creek to Indian Lake hut-to-hut routeAlthough most of the Adirondack hut-to-hut discussion lately has focused on Boreas Ponds as the state considers the classification of the Forest Preserve land, another route is much closer to becoming reality: the North Creek-Indian Lake traverse with a Hudson Gorge rafting trip.

Jack Drury of Leading E.D.G.E, who with Joe Dadey and Duane Gould prepared the 2015 hut-to-hut plan for the five towns of Long Lake, Newcomb, Indian Lake, Minerva, and North Hudson for the Department of Environmental Conservation, called it the low-hanging fruit of the report and believes it will be ready by summer 2018. » Continue Reading.


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