Sunday, April 23, 2017

Wild Foods Workshop at Whallonsburg Grange

wild foodOn Sunday, April 30, the Whallonsburg Grange Hall will present “Dig, Cut, Cook, Eat: An introduction to harvesting and preparing wild foods,” taught by Dillon Klepetar, co-owner of Farmstead Catering in Essex.

The course will include a field portion and a kitchen portion, beginning with a hunt for nearby wild foods. Participants will then use what is collected, supplemented by local farm products, to collaboratively prepare a lunch feast in the Grange’s commercial kitchen. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 6, 2017

Franklin County Girl Wins NYS Guernsey Award

Adyson Miller wins guernsey calfCornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County has announced Adyson Miller as the winner of the 2017 New York State Guernsey Calf Scholarship Program. The Calf Scholarship Award Program is sponsored by the New York State Guernsey Breeders Association for the purpose of encouraging those who do not presently own Guernseys to become involved with the Guernsey Breed. A purebred Guernsey Calf goes to the candidate who shows interest in the Guernsey breed and who has demonstrated the capabilities of developing the animal to its fullest potential.

Adyson was selected as the winner of the calf by a committee among more than 30 applicants. The application process requires applicants to submit an essay answering a series of questions designed to assist the selection committee on awarding a winner that ensures the safe placement of calf, has the ability and means to care for the animal, and positively promotes the Guernsey breed. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 6, 2017

Inlet Egg Hunts Foster Community Spirit

Easter is right around the corner and egg scrambles and scavenger hunts are scattered around the Adirondack Park. Though Inlet is known for its creative events (think July 4th Ping-Pong Ball Drop), they want to celebrate the adults in their community with an “adult only” egg hunt.

According to Inlet Information Office’s Department Head Mitch Lee, their organization is always hatching all sorts of events for visitors and residents of the Inlet community. Their small community has always relied on eco-tourism and has a full schedule of events that have stood the test of time. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Last ‘Official’ Maple Weekend in the Adirondacks

Pancake breakfasts, wooded walks and maple tastings are all on the menu of the the last official New York State Maple Producers Association’s Maple Weekend. Maple producers have been making syrup since mid-February, and it’s shaping-up to be a banner year.

Since the mid-1990s, a one-day open house has grown across New York State into two full Maple Weekends. This weekend (March 25-26) is a great opportunity to learn more about our region’s favorite sugary treat. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Adirondack Spruce Gum Was Once A Hot Commodity

All this talk from me during the last two weeks about spruce-related subjects (Sprucelets and spruce beer) is linked to past conversations with my mom, a native of Churubusco in northern Clinton County.

It’s officially known as the Town of Clinton, but to local folks, it’s just Busco — and about as country as it gets around here. Growing up there on a farm in the 1920s and ’30s, Mom partook in things that were once the norm, like drinking raw milk and chewing spruce gum. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Small Farm Marketing and Growing Shiitakes Feb 17th

Warren County Soil & Water is continuing year four of its “Farm Talks” on Friday, February 17th from 6 to 8 pm at DEC’s Warrensburg Office, 232 Golf Course Road.

The first presentation of the night will be “Growing Shiitake Mushrooms” with Casey Holzworth from Kelsey’s Quarter Acre Farm. Shiitake mushrooms are a relatively easy addition to any small farm or home garden and they can grow in inoculated hardwood logs like oaks, maples, or ironwood. Casey’s presentation will cover growing environments, usable logs, inoculation of logs, growing climates, and harvesting. Mushroom cultivation is growing in popularity due to the market response and limited space needed to cultivate. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 6, 2017

Schoolyard Maple Sugaring Program Announced

In partnership with the New York State Maple Foundation, New York Agriculture in the Classroom and Cornell Cooperative Extension have announced a maple syrup contest for grades Pre-K through 12.

Classrooms will be paired with a local maple producer to help guide them through the syrup-making process. Each division (elementary, middle school, high school) will be judged for taste, clarity, and color by a panel of maple experts this May. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 23, 2017

Fort Ticonderoga Garden, Landscape Symposium Set

Garden & Landscape SymposiumThe King’s Garden at Fort Ticonderoga will hold the sixth annual Garden & Landscape Symposium on Saturday, April 8th in the Mars Education Center. Designed for both beginning and experienced gardeners, this day-long symposium includes insights from garden experts who live and garden in upstate New York and northern New England. This event is open by pre-registration only. » Continue Reading.


Friday, January 20, 2017

View’s 11th Annual Chili Bowl Luncheon

chili bowl luncheonView’s 11th Annual Chili Bowl Luncheon will take place on Saturday, February 18 from 11:30 am to 2 pm. Homemade meat and vegetarian chili, and stews and soups prepared by local restaurants will be served in handmade bowls from the Pottery Workshop at View and other artists, that deliver their handmade bowls to View. This year’s potters have made many styles of bowls, featuring a variety of surface decorations. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Agriculture, Forest Funding for Hamilton County Residents

The Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District has partnered with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to provide financial assistance for agriculture and forest management to Hamilton County landowners though the United States Department of Agriculture Resource Conservation Partnership Program.

Funding is available for residents who would like to enhance their agricultural practices through the installation of high tunnels over an existing garden. Funding is also available for implementing forest management plans and wildlife habitat enhancement practices. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 27, 2016

January Farm Talks Planned For Warrensburg

Warren County Soil & Water is beginning year four of its “Farm Talks” on Friday, January 13th from 6 to 8 pm at DEC’s Warrensburg Office, 232 Golf Course Road.

The first presentation of the night will be “Soil Blocks: A Better Start” with Rand Fosdick, Farm Manager of Landon Hill Estate Farm. In the northeast, starting your vegetable seeds early and correctly will lead to healthier plants with a head start to transplanting in spring. The soil block methodology is growing in popularity due to the success vegetable producers are having with this pot-less technique. The general concept behind it is using a soil recipe with structure and nutrients and a tool called a “soil blocker” to form the soil mixture into blocks to directly plant your seeds into. Soil blocks reduce transplant shock and add nutrients to your garden beds. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Support For Shiitake Mushroom Growing Offered

shiitake mushroomThe Cornell Small Farms Program, with support from the USDA Specialty Crop Grant Program and New York Farm Viability Institute, is engaged in a two year project to elevate development of a new niche crop in the New York; log-grown shiitake mushrooms.

Research and development at Cornell over the past decade, along with several partnerships and research projects has enabled greater understanding of the technical and business aspects of a small farm log-grown shiitake enterprise. Woodland log-grown mushrooms are a relatively new, niche crop and are low-input, high output enterprise that can also offset land taxes. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 29, 2016

On The Color of Cranberries

cranberriesAs a kid fidgeting at my grandmother’s Thanksgiving table, I often wondered, what’s the point of cranberries? She had a live-in Irish cook who insisted on serving whole cranberries suspended in a kind of gelatinous inverted bog. If I ventured to eat a berry I experienced the power of my gag reflex.

How times change! The humble American cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, in my opinion, is worthy of a downright homage. I am a fan. Yes, cranberries are tart, sour, and even bitter, but that makes them both good food and strong medicine. The Wampanoag called them ibimi, meaning sour or bitter berries. They crushed them into animal fats and dried deer meat to make pemmican, a food full of energy and vitamin C for long winter trips. Mariners brought them on sea voyages to fend off scurvy. According to passed down knowledge, the Algonquin used the leaves of cranberry to treat bladder infections, arthritis, and diabetes-related circulation problems. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Nutting Season: An Old-Time Ritual

blackwalnutwikipdThanksgiving, with food a major holiday component, calls to mind a time of year that was once the subject of great anticipation: nutting season. I’m not old enough to have experienced it first-hand, although back in the 1980s I did explore many natural edibles. Among my favorites was beechnuts, which we harvested and used in chocolate-chip cookies. Outstanding!

But in days long ago, when many folks earned a subsistence living that utilized home-grown vegetables and wild foods, nutting season was an important time. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Growing and Buying Heirloom Apples

heirloom applesAs Eve so famously discovered, apples are alluring. These brightly colored orbs tempt us with crisp flesh and juicy sweetness. It’s no wonder that apples have spread throughout the temperate regions of the world.

The mother of all apples, malus sieversii, which originated in the rugged mountains of Central Asia, has given rise to thousands of varieties over time, bearing names ranging from regal to whimsical, including Maiden’s Blush, Blue Pearmain, Bellefleur, Duchess of Oldenburg, and Seek No Further. Apples first arrived in the Americas in the 1600s, and by the early nineteenth century were being grown to make everything from cider, sauce and pies to apple butter. » Continue Reading.


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