Sunday, October 23, 2016

Changes for Fisher, Marten, and Bobcat Seasons

DEC LogoFurbearer trapping will begin soon in many parts of New York State, following changes to fisher and marten trapping seasons, as well as changes to some general trapping regulations and expanded hunting for bobcat.

While coyote hunting season began October 1 in much the state, hunting seasons for other furbearers such as bobcat, raccoon, and fox begins October 25. Trappers should be aware of changes to trapping regulations for fisher beginning this fall, including: » Continue Reading.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Conservation Council Seeks Committee Applicants for 2017

nyscc-logoThe New York State Conservation Council (NYSCC) is seeking Committee applicants for 2017. NYSCC is the oldest conservation organization in New York State, comprised of volunteers who are concerned with sound management of the state’s and the nation’s land, water, fish and wildlife.

Members are involved in a variety of Council issues dealing with hunting, trapping and angling, and ranging from educating youth and adults, to legislation, and including projects such as cleaning up waterways and roadsides and habitat improvement for sportsmen and women. » Continue Reading.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

International Paper Endows Paul Smith’s College Professor

Brett McLeodA Paul Smith’s College professor has been named as the institution’s first International Paper Endowed Professor in Forestry Economics. Dr. Brett McLeod, professor of Natural Resource Management and Policy and 2003 graduate of Paul Smith’s, was honored with the distinction last week during a ceremony at the college.

The $500,000 endowment from International Paper will allow McLeod to continue his work in natural resource economics for the remainder of his career at Paul Smith’s College and could also help attract world-class professors to fill the position when he retires. » Continue Reading.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

How Raccoons Prepare For Winter

racoon washingAlmost every time I checked the game camera last summer – whether it was stationed near the compost, pointed into the field, or hidden at the edge of the woods – I found photos of one of our region’s most outwardly endearing creatures: the raccoon. With their black masks under perfect white eyebrows, their petite black noses, fuzzy ears, and fetchingly striped bushy tails, raccoons are certainly charming to look at. But that soft and cuddly exterior belies a fierce and highly intelligent disposition. » Continue Reading.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Ticket Issued For Mounted Endangered Black Wolf

illegally mounted black wolfNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Officers (ECOs) enforce the 71 Chapters of NY Environmental Conservation Law, protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York.

On September 18, ECO Keith Kelly received a complaint that a large black wolf mount was being offered for sale at the Adirondack Mountains Antiques Show in Indian Lake. Officer Kelly reported that he responded and observed the wolf on display without a price tag. After interviewing visitors at the show, Kelly says that he learned that the vendor was asking $2,500 for the mount. According to Kelly, the vendor could not produce any permits to possess the wolf and was issued a ticket for offering an endangered species for sale without a permit. The wolf was seized as evidence and will be forfeited if the vendor is found guilty of the charge. » Continue Reading.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

How Do Birds Know When To Migrate?

Phoebe w/ seed headsOn the north end of my home is a nest site favored by eastern phoebes. Every year a pair shows up, sets up house, and raises a family. They arrive early in the spring, and I spend the long days of spring and summer watching them. At some point, the nest empties out, and then I know that summer will soon end and the phoebes will be on their way.

But exactly when they will be on their way is hard to predict. Fall’s migration tends to be a more open-ended process compared to spring’s, when the urgency to reproduce drives birds to arrive in the Northeast during a relatively short window of time. There is an almost explosive quality to the arrival of songbirds in March and April. One day we wake to the usual quiet of winter, and then the next there is a riot of trilling, chirping, calling, and singing.

As summer winds down, however, the volume diminishes slowly. In August, I still wake to bird songs, but there are fewer voices; the chorus isn’t as frenetic and rich. » Continue Reading.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Adirondack Loon Center Open House Sunday

loonBiodiversity Research Institute’s (BRI’s) Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation has invited the public to attend an Open House from 4-6 pm on Sunday, October 9, at the new Adirondack Loon Center at 47 Main St. in Saranac Lake. The Open House will be an opportunity for people to meet the staff of the Loon Center, and ask their most compelling loon questions. Refreshments will be served.

The Center houses a gift shop focused on loon-related items, from comical rubber loons to beautiful artwork and jewelry by Adirondack artisans. It also provides office space for the Center’s growing staff, including Audrey Hyson, store manager; Mike Lynch, communications specialist; Tim Flannery, store assistant; intern Kevin Williams; as well as Nina Schoch, the Loon Center’s coordinator and Martha Van der Voort, its education/outreach coordinator. » Continue Reading.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Wild Center Debuts New Baby Animals This Weekend

otterThe Wild Center family is expanding this fall and visitors have the chance to meet the newest members over Columbus Day Weekend.  An otter, porcupine, black rat snake and rare, albino wood turtle are all calling The Wild Center their new home.

There will be animal encounters with the new residents throughout the weekend, a baby-themed golden otter quest and visitors have the chance to make their own baby animal to take home. Born to be Wild! is on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, October 8–10, from 10 am until 5 pm. The Wild Center is located at 45 Museum Drive in Tupper Lake. » Continue Reading.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Presentation On Old Growth Forests Friday

Dr. Joan MaloofDr. Joan Maloof, founder and executive director of the Old-Growth Forest Network, will lead a discussion about old-growth forests, what they are, where they’re located, and how they can be conserved.

Maloof will talk about the current status of the earth’s forests, particularly, the ancient forests in the Adirondacks and eastern United State. She will also share the Old-Growth Forest Network’s vision for protecting the remaining and future old-growth forests. » Continue Reading.

Saturday, October 1, 2016

The Ecological Impact Of The Current Drought

wood frogScenes from the West’s five-year drought are striking – the cracked mud at the bottom of a dry reservoir, forests in flames. Wonder what a drought would look like in the Northern Forest? Just look out the window.

This is the first time that any part of New Hampshire has been in an “extreme drought” since the federal government began publishing a drought index in 2000, said Mary Lemcke-Stampone, the state’s climatologist. “Using state records, you have to go back to the early ‘80s to get the extreme dryness we’ve been seeing in southeastern New Hampshire.” » Continue Reading.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Adirondack Wildlife: Fall Peepers?

spring peeperWe like to think that everything in nature has its own particular time and place. But nature is fond of throwing us curves. As a naturalist, a common question I’m asked during foliage season is, “why are spring peepers calling in my woods at this time of year?”

Even ardent students of nature can be stumped by the plaintive, autumnal notes of peepers; sounds that we easily recognize in the spring can seem alien when they appear out of context. Jim Andrews, Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Rubenstein School at the University of Vermont, and Vermont’s go-to expert on all things herpetological, described how autumn peepers have fooled birders. “They were trying to locate the birds that made these noises in the fall, of course, with no success.” » Continue Reading.

Monday, September 26, 2016

Poisonous Caterpillars Of Northern New York

hickory tussock mothWhen I was a kid I was fascinated by caterpillars, but had trouble with the word. To me, the sweet little woolly-bear traversing my hand was a “calipitter.” It was only years later I learned that a calipitter is an instrument used to measure the diameter of a caterpillar to the nearest micron.

Caterpillars continue to interest me, although I no longer find them universally cute. Imagine the letdown and loss of innocence following the discovery that some of these fuzzy, fascinating, gentle creatures that tickled their way across my hand were venomous. This revelation was akin to finding out Bambi was a dangerous carnivore, which in fact is a fear that haunts me to this day. » Continue Reading.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Great Adirondack Moose Festival This Weekend

mooseThe 7th Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival will take place this weekend, September 24th and 25th, in Indian Lake. Moose-themed family fun activities will be the main attraction during the weekend.

Visitors to Indian Lake can enjoy programs, games, contests, exhibitions – all in the name of the elusive and majestic moose. The half-ton mammal has made a come-back in the Adirondacks, and one may even spot a moose during the Festival weekend. The Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival (GAMF) is sponsored by the Indian Lake Chamber of Commerce and a host of regional and local business sponsors. » Continue Reading.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Whallonsburg Grange Lyceum Series Begins Tuesday

grange lyceum seriesThe Fall 2016 Lyceum lecture series at the Whallonsburg Grange Hall will focus on how people have shaped the landscape through work, recreation, conflict and experiences.

“Living on This Land” features six presentations that will look at different aspects of how humans – through our lives and actions – impact and change where we live. The lectures are on Tuesday nights at 7:30 and a $5 donation is requested (students free). » Continue Reading.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Threatened Northern Sunfish Discovered In Clinton County

northern sunfish

In early September, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Rare Fish Unit Biologist Doug Carlson and technician Eric Maxwell identified nearly a dozen threatened northern sunfish in the Great Chazy River in the village of Champlain, Clinton County

Also known as the longear sunfish, the northern sunfish is a small, thin, deep-bodied fish that averages three to four inches in length. It is sometimes a colorful fish with an olive to rusty-brown back, bright orange belly, and blue-green bars on the side of the head. The northern sunfish has short, round pectoral fins and an upward-slanting gill cover flap that has a white and red flexible edge. It is often mistaken for a pumpkinseed sunfish. » Continue Reading.

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