Monday, July 21, 2014

Paddling Case Advances To Appellate Court

Map by Nancy BernsteinA state appeals court is expected to hear arguments this fall in a trespassing lawsuit filed against Adirondack Explorer Editor Phil Brown after he paddled through private land on a remote waterway that connects two tracts of state land in the William C. Whitney Wilderness.

The landowners—the Brandreth Park Association and Friends of Thayer Lake—sued Brown in the fall of 2010, more than a year after he wrote about the paddling trip for the Adirondack Explorer.

Last year, State Supreme Court Justice Richard T. Aulisi dismissed the suit, but the landowners have appealed to the court’s Appellate Division in Albany. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, July 20, 2014

2 New Maps From St. Regis Canoe Outfitters

Two mapsSt. Regis Canoe Outfitters has published two new waterproof maps for paddlers, one covering the three Saranac Lakes, the other covering the St. Regis Canoe Area.

The color maps cover some of the same territory as the Adirondack Paddler’s Map, also published by St. Regis Canoe Outfitters, but the new maps are more detailed and, being smaller, easier to handle.

They’re also less expensive: $9.95 versus $19.95 for the Adirondack Paddler’s Map (which is four times as large).

“Many first-time visitors are going to grab a $10 map before they grab a $20 map,” said Dave Cilley, owner of St. Regis Canoe Outfitters, which has stores in Saranac Lake and Floodwood. » Continue Reading.



Saturday, July 19, 2014

Brendan Wiltse: Silver Lake Mountain

BJW_3902After spending years tromping around the High Peaks and living in the Johns Brook Valley, I take delight in visiting the smaller and often lesser known mountains. Silver Lake Mountain is just north of Taylor Pond (middle of the photograph). At 1.8 miles round-trip it makes a perfect hike to do after work. You don’t see many high peaks, but you do have a good view of Whiteface and the unique combination of big mountains and large bodies of water. Just behind Taylor Pond is Catamount, another great mountain to check out. What is your favorite mountain outside of the high peaks?



Saturday, July 19, 2014

Pete Nelson: Who is NYCO?

WollastoniteA month ago I wrote a column advocating that we create and maintain a regional memory of the NYCO amendment process and all that comes from it. My argument is that by doing so we will be better able to prevail in future battles against amendments that propose to take from the Forest Preserve for private gain. At the end of that column I said my starting point would be to ask who NYCO really is, in contrast to the picture of NYCO given by its own claims, by pro-amendment advocates and by popular assumption.

At the moment we need no assistance recalling the amendment controversy since NYCO is once again all over the regional news. With the dual stories that NYCO is seeking to expand its two existing mines and that environmental groups have sued to stop test drilling on Lot 8, any profile of NYCO is not only important in chronicling the amendment process, it is relevant right now. NYCO is making certain claims, environmental groups are making others and the state of New York still others. That means the question I pose today matters, today: who is NYCO? » Continue Reading.



Friday, July 18, 2014

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


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Friday, July 18, 2014

Adirondack Park Institute to Honor Nature Conservancy

The-Essex-Chain-Nancie-Battaglia-300x192The Adirondack Park Institute (API) will honor the Adirondack Nature Conservancy at its Third Annual Awards Gala to be held on Friday, August 8 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.

The Gala will be presided over by Newcomb Town Supervisor George Canon as Honorary Chair with Tim Barnett, First Executive Director of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy accepting the Frank M. Hutchins Environmental Leadership Award. » Continue Reading.



Friday, July 18, 2014

Ed Kanze: The Unsung, Well Sung, Pine Warbler

ed_kanze_pine_warblerThe pine warbler is often heard but rarely seen. To identify one of these birds, even at close range, you’ve got to inventory its features, hear it sing if possible, and ponder. Listen here as I welcome one of these feathered flying insect-eaters to our bird feeder in this week’s edition of All Things natural with Ed Kanze.

The podcast is produced by Mountain Lake PBS’s Josh Clement. Listen to past episodes by visiting Mountain Lake PBS’s Borderless North webpage at mountainlake.org/bn.



Friday, July 18, 2014

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (July 17)

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This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. A narrative version of this report can be found at Mountain Lake PBS.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 17, 2014

Invasive Spiny Waterflea Spreading in Adirondack Lakes

SWF-on-LG-Emily-DeBolt-resizedSpiny waterflea, a tiny invasive species that can have a significant impact on the aquatic food chain of waterways, is spreading in the Adirondack Park.

First discovered in the region in Great Sacandaga Lake in 2008, spiny waterflea is also in Stewarts Bridge Reservoir, Peck Lake, Sacandaga Lake, Lake George, and the Glens Falls Feeder Canal. Recent surveys detected populations in Hamilton County in Lake Pleasant, which adjoins Sacandaga Lake, and nearby Piseco Lake. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 17, 2014

Jessica Tabora: Watch Rock On Pharaoh Lake

Pharaoh Lake from Watch Rock

I keep coming back to Pharaoh Lake. It’s full of campsites and lean-tos, great swimming too. I finally had the chance to stay at Watch Rock. With a large lean-to and Pharaoh mountain close-by, this spot is very popular.  There are several spots to sit along the site. This picture was taken during a break in a summer storm.



Thursday, July 17, 2014

ORDA Adds Extreme Tubing At Olympic Ski Jumps

ExtremeTubingIf you’re seeking excitement this summer, the Olympic Jumping Complex, in Lake Placid, has you covered with Extreme Tubing. Hop in and hold on as you rocket down the landing hills of the 90 meter, 48 meter and 20 meter ski jumps, approaching speeds of up to 50 miles-per-hour.

Extreme Tubing will be available Tuesday through Saturday from 3:30-6:30 p.m. Additional hours are also being offered Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from noon- 2 p.m. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 17, 2014

‘Made In The Adirondacks’ Fair Debuts Saturday

AdirondackMuseum-MadeInTheAdirondacks-RheaCostelloCeramicsArtists, artisans, crafters, and makers are heading to Blue Mountain Lake from all over the North Country to showcase their traditions and wares at the “Made in the Adirondacks” fair, debuting at the Adirondack Museum from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, July 19.  The event is included with general museum admission.

A  joint project of the museum, the Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA)  and Traditional Arts of Upstate New York (TAUNY), “Made in the Adirondacks” highlights small, local businesses; products inspired by the majesty of the Adirondack wilderness; and the people who produce them using techniques handed down through the generations. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

During A High Peaks Camping Trip, The Birth Of The National Wilderness Act

JohnsonOn a warm September day in 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed what is now recognized as one of the most significant legislative acts in American environmental history. This was the national Wilderness Act. Before then, federal lands, even those protected as national parks or national forests were expected to serve a variety of functions. The national forests, for example, permitted logging, mining, and grazing. The national parks were often centered on opulent hotels and other all-too-civilized amenities. The idea of setting aside part of the public domain as wilderness, even though this word was and is difficult to define, was radical then, and it remains controversial today. It was a monumental step, and its roots lie in the Adirondacks.

How European-Americans have thought about this amorphous thing we call wilderness has been a complicated, often torturous story. (How Native Americans navigated these shoals is another story altogether, but their views have seldom if ever been consulted as this country has gone about the process of setting land-use policy.) If we go back far enough, we find a pervasive hostility to what many of us now treasure. In 1620, for example, the Pilgrim William Bradford contemplated the forests of eastern Massachusetts, which seemed to stand between his band of cold and hungry settlers and any sort of security, and declared despairingly that nothing lay before them other than “a hideous and desolate wilderness.” Wilderness, in other words, was the enemy. If these people expected to survive, let alone prosper, the wilderness had to be eliminated as soon as possible. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

DEC Extends Comment Deadline For Essex Chain

Essex ChainThe state Department of Environmental Conservation is giving the public an extra week to submit comments on its draft management plan for the Essex Chain Lakes. The state acquired the Essex Chain last year from the Nature Conservancy, which purchased it in 2007 from Finch, Pruyn & Company.

Following is the entirety of DEC’s news release:

The public will have an additional seven days to comment on the Essex Chain Lakes Management Complex Draft Unit Management Plan (Draft Essex Chain UMP) and Draft Community Connector Multiple Use Trail Plan (Draft Trail Plan UMP) the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today. DEC extended the comment period until July 25 in response to stakeholders seeking additional time to review the plan and provide comment.

The Essex Chain Lakes Management Complex includes the 6,956-acre Essex Chain Primitive Area, the 2,788-acre Pine Lake Primitive Area and a portion of the 42,537-acre Blue Mountain Wild Forest. The complex of lands is located in the Town of Indian Lake in Hamilton County, and towns of Newcomb and Minerva in Essex County.

» Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Learning To Keep Our Distance From Nesting Loons

2003-WFS Turtle Pd loon-7+t300There is a loon on Lake Placid’s Mirror Lake that seems almost tame. Sometimes when my family and I are out canoeing it seems to follow us. It is that very familiarity and comfortableness with nature that causes a conflict between humans and nesting loons.

Though Dr. Nina Schoch, Wildlife Veterinarian with the Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) assures me that particular loon isn’t nesting if it’s in the center of the lake and not issue warning signs. According to Schoch there are specific ways for humans to tell if they are distressing loons. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

First Electric Car Charging Station In Adirondack Interior

ElectCarCharging-1The Tesla pulls silently into the driveway and sidles next to the charging station. With the ease of charging a cell phone, the car is plugged in and its owners make their way into The Wild Center. The Center’s new charging station is a first step to making the Tri-Lakes region of the Adirondacks (Tupper Lake, Saranac Lake, and Lake Placid) electric-car friendly.

In addition to plug-in stations already up and running in Canton, Potsdam, Plattsburgh, and Lake George, this electric charging station will provide a battery charge for those visiting the heart of the Adirondacks.

Every major car maker is producing or has plans for electric vehicles, some of which can get the equivalent of 119 miles per gallon and have an annual fuel cost of $500. Federal tax credits are currently available for electric vehicles. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

An Adirondack Perspective On Plein Air In North Creek

PleinAiratNorthCreekThe Widlund Gallery at Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek is presenting the exhibit Plein Air: An Adirondack Perspective.

The exhibition, which runs until July 30th, features acclaimed regional artists Frances Gaffney (graphite), Diane Leifheit (pastel), Janet Marie Yeates (oil) and Sarah Yeoman (watercolor) and all art work will be available for purchase.

This Thursday and Friday, July 17 and 18, artists will paint outdoors in and around the scenic town of North Creek. The public is especially invited to watch them demonstrate their techniques July 17 during Art Walk from 5 to 7 pm. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Earthjustice Obtains Court Order To Block NYCO Drilling

vernal poolEarthjustice has obtained a court order blocking NYCO Minerals from test drilling in the Jay Mountain Wilderness Area until the judge has a chance to hear oral arguments in Earthjustice’s lawsuit against NYCO and two state agencies.

State Supreme Court Justice Thomas Buchanan on Monday granted Earthjustice’s request for a temporary restraining order–providing the plaintiffs post a $10,000 bond to cover NYCO’s damages if Earthjustice loses the suit. NYCO could have begun work as early as this week and argued in court that delays would hurt the company financially.

Earthjustice attorney Deborah Goldberg said the bond was posted Wednesday afternoon.

» Continue Reading.



Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Moose At Helldiver Pond In The Moose River Plains

Moose At Helldiver Pond by John Warren

Perhaps the most photographed moose in the Adirondacks is this visitor to Helldiver Pond in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest between Indian Lake and Inlet. This photo was taken Friday afternoon (on a long lens in order to keep a respectful distance).



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