Sunday, April 23, 2017

Chris Maron of CATS: Everyone Benefits From Trails

champlain area trailsHow can everyone benefit from trails? Let’s look at the past, present, and future.

The Champlain Valley was the last part added to the Adirondack Park. It has little public land and, until recently, few hiking trails. This limited the economic benefits of outdoor recreation because people bypassed the valley on their way to trails in the High Peaks. But, that is changing.

What led to the change? First, land conservation organizations and the state purchased key properties like Split Rock Wild Forest, Coon Mountain, and Black Kettle Farm. This expanded public access to the outdoors. Next, new “local-food” farms started up attracting young people and reviving the farm community. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 23, 2017

Adirondack Historic Preservation Award Nominations Sought

Old Warren County Courthouse_ Lake GeorgeAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the region, has opened nominations for its 2017 Preservation Awards. For over 20 years, these annual awards have recognized sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse of historic structures, as well as individuals who have promoted historic preservation and community revitalization consistent with AARCH’s mission.

Projects of all sizes and scopes are eligible for consideration. The deadline for nominations is July 1, 2017. A celebration of the 2017 award winners will be on September 18, 2017, at a farm-to-table luncheon at the Nettle Meadow Farm, a 2016 AARCH Presevation Award recipient in the town of Thurman near Warrensburg. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 23, 2017

Wild Foods Workshop at Whallonsburg Grange

wild foodOn Sunday, April 30, the Whallonsburg Grange Hall will present “Dig, Cut, Cook, Eat: An introduction to harvesting and preparing wild foods,” taught by Dillon Klepetar, co-owner of Farmstead Catering in Essex.

The course will include a field portion and a kitchen portion, beginning with a hunt for nearby wild foods. Participants will then use what is collected, supplemented by local farm products, to collaboratively prepare a lunch feast in the Grange’s commercial kitchen. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 22, 2017

Collaboration Yields Dividends At Tannery Pond Center

tannery pondWhat follows is an essay by the Board of Trustees of  the Tannery Pond Center, located on Main Street in North Creek.

Enhanced collaboration between the Town of Johnsburg (TOJ) and the non-profit Tannery Pond Center (TPC) organization has brought this region the wonderful opportunity of having more varied and more frequent entertainment, educational programs, and other events scheduled at the Tannery Pond Community Center (TPCC) for the benefit of the residents of, and visitors to, this region.

In this special partnership between the TOJ and the TPC, the TPC raises money (currently about $65,000 a year) to bring an amazing variety of musicians, lecturers, and other entertainers to the Center and manages the operations; while the TOJ, which owns the facility, maintains the building and funds a part-time employee whose primary charge is scheduling. Over 500 events, meetings and activities were held in the building in 2016, with only a handful of days in which no one occupied any space. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 22, 2017

Home Owners Encouraged to Practice Sustainable Lawn Care

To protect water quality this spring, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is urging New Yorkers to practice sustainable lawn care by going phosphorus free, using native plants and grasses, and reducing fertilizer use. DEC has launched the “Look for the Zero” campaign to encourage New Yorkers to purchase phosphorus-free lawn fertilizer, as more than 100 water bodies in New York State cannot be used or enjoyed as a result of too much phosphorus.

New York’s nutrient runoff law prohibits the use of phosphorus lawn fertilizers unless a new lawn is being established or a soil test shows that the lawn does not have enough phosphorus. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 22, 2017

Tim Rowland On Adirondack Experience

Adirondack Experience Adirondack Museum“Good things,” said that wise old sage Homer Simpson, “don’t end in -eum. They end in -mania or -teria.”

Yes, sadly, “museum” is an unpopular word. Which is why the magnificent Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake is changing its name (or its “identity,” as marketing jargon would have it) to the Adirondack Experience. » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 21, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, April 21, 2017

Peoples Pixel Project Film Screening April 30th

2016 8th Annual People's Pixel winnersThe Lake George Arts Project will present the 8th Annual People’s Pixel Project, a celebration of short videos on Sunday, April 30th, at The Hyde Museum in Glens Falls, from 2 to 4 pm. Tickets are $10, sold at the door. » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 21, 2017

Essex, Gore Community Fund Accepting Grant Applications

The Essex Community Fund (ECF) and the Community Fund for the Gore Mountain Region (CFGMR) are accepting applications from area schools, municipalities, nonprofit, and community organizations for their 2017 grant cycles. » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 21, 2017

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, April 20, 2017

David Gibson: A World Class Park And The North Hudson Gateway

How many times can we use the phrase “world class” and have it mean much?

Governor Cuomo has used that term to describe the $32 million Gateway to the Adirondacks around Northway Exit 29 in North Hudson. This “world class recreational experience will be realized through the establishment of state, local and private partnerships,” said the Governor’s State of the State report. “Transforming this site into an attractive destination will link local and regional resources and provide year round recreation opportunities and services for multiple uses, users and businesses… Drawing  visitors to North Hudson to connect with premier opportunities for hiking, biking, horseback riding, snowmobiling and boating. This, coupled with commercial business development, will revitalize communities and help transform this region.”

I join others in certainly wishing this Gateway project well. But in a sense every I-87 Northway exit is a kind of gateway for visitors and residents who seek what the Adirondack Park has to offer – not just recreation but re-creation of ourselves in some cases, not just adventure but transformative experience in some cases, not just an automotive gateway but a gateway to the mind, the emotions and the senses that highly contrasts with our response to populous, pressure packed, polluted places and imagery not far away. When you drive into the Park you immediately realize this is not anyplace USA. That’s not an accident but a result of policies to protect the Park. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 20, 2017

Deep Snow On Summits: Current Adirondack Conditions (Apr 20)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled by Adirondack Almanack founder and editor John Warren for publication each Thursday afternoon. John’s condensed version for radio can be heard Friday mornings on WSLP Lake Placid, and the stations of North Country Public Radio.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Send observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 20, 2017

Emerging Concerns Over Banded Mystery Snails

Banded Mystery SnailThe warming temperatures and receding ice are giving way to open water and increased recreational activities. It is time once again to think about aquatic invasive species. An emerging threat to our fish populations and bird populations is the Banded Mystery Snail.

The Banded Mystery Snail (Viviparus georgianus) a non-native species to the Adirondacks was introduced in 1867 into the Hudson River. It is historically native to Florida and Georgia among other southeastern states. It has been found in many bodies of water located within New York, including Lake Champlain and Lake George. The public, officials and scientists have not taken much note of this non-native species believing that any environmental impacts would be negligible. Current data is showcasing a different picture and further research is needed. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 20, 2017

New Analysis: Freshwater Lakes Getting Saltier

lake mononaNorth America’s freshwater lakes are getting saltier due to development and exposure to road salt. A study of 371 lakes published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports that many Midwestern and Northeastern lakes are experiencing increasing chloride trends, with some 44% of lakes sampled in these regions undergoing long-term salinization.

The study is the first large-scale analysis of chloride trends in freshwater lakes. It was conducted by a team of fifteen researchers as part of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) Fellowship Program, an initiative that seeks to train the next generation of freshwater scientists and practitioners. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Adirondack Museum Changes Name To ‘The Adirondack Experience’

The Adirondack Museum has changed its name to The Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX).

Director of Marketing Ausra Angermann, who came on board in February and has helped implement the name change, said  “Changing a name and identity is not a decision that is taken lightly. The name change was under way before I came on board. Research was conducted and a marketing team put in place as well as an agency to help with the transition.” » Continue Reading.


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