Thursday, September 22, 2016

Comments Sought on Grass River Area Management

tooley pond waterway accessA Draft Unit Management Plan (UMP) for the Grass River Wild Forest, and Draft Recreation Management Plans (RMPs) for the Grass River Conservation Easement and the Tooley Pond Conservation Easement have been released by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) for public review and comment.

DEC will accept public input on the draft UMP and RMPs at a public meeting on Monday, October 3, 2016 from 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm at Colton – Pierrepont Central School Auditorium, 4921 NY-56, in Colton. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 22, 2016

Dick Booth to Receive Wilderness Award

Dick BoothFormer Adirondack Park Agency Member and State Land Chair Richard Booth, who left the APA on July 1 after eight years of public service, will receive Adirondack Wild’s highest honor – the Paul Schaefer Wilderness Award.

The award will be conveyed on Saturday, October 1 at Adirondack Wild’s annual meeting at the Indian Lake Theater in Indian Lake, Hamilton County, starting at 1 pm. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Adirondack Trivia: The Presidential Mountains

trmountainmwannerwikiNew Hampshire’s famous Presidential Range in the White Mountains has many peaks named after presidents and other famous statesmen. While we don’t have a range here in the Adirondacks dedicated to our nation’s leaders, we do have several mountains that bear presidential surnames. They weren’t necessarily named after White House occupants, but the name is the key if you like trivia games, which I do. Giving it some thought, how many can you name?

The High Peaks by far get the most attention in the Adirondacks, but because I began favoring less-traveled areas many years ago as popular trails became more crowded, I climbed some lesser-known mountains that happened to have presidential names. In the trivia realm, that helped me list a half dozen before I turned to digging up some additional examples. Without revealing their names just yet, here’s a bit of info about each. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Cemetery Preservation Program Planned At Camp Sagamore

gravestone Great Camp Sagamore will hold a two-day presentation on cemetery and gravestone restoration on Tuesday, September 27th, and Wednesday, September 28th.

For many people, cemeteries are sacred sites, locations that not only provide spiritual comfort for both the living and the deceased, but also help communities maintain connections with their collective cultural history. Over time, however, many small cemeteries fall into disrepair and decay, as loved ones move on and communities grow. For its part, New York State is home to thousands of neglected or abandoned cemeteries, many of which are technically the responsibility of their surrounding communities. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Threatened Northern Sunfish Discovered In Clinton County

northern sunfish

In early September, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Rare Fish Unit Biologist Doug Carlson and technician Eric Maxwell identified nearly a dozen threatened northern sunfish in the Great Chazy River in the village of Champlain, Clinton County

Also known as the longear sunfish, the northern sunfish is a small, thin, deep-bodied fish that averages three to four inches in length. It is sometimes a colorful fish with an olive to rusty-brown back, bright orange belly, and blue-green bars on the side of the head. The northern sunfish has short, round pectoral fins and an upward-slanting gill cover flap that has a white and red flexible edge. It is often mistaken for a pumpkinseed sunfish. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Towns Campaign For Motorized, Bike Access At Boreas Ponds

North Hudson and four nearby towns have launched a website and petition drive to muster support for classifying Boreas Ponds as Wild Forest instead of Wilderness, the designation supported by Forest Preserve advocates.

Called Access the Adirondacks, the website says the 20,758-acre Boreas Ponds Tract has a network of former logging roads and is suitable for a variety of recreational uses, including mountain biking, horseback riding, and snowmobiling.

“While some would have you believe the Boreas Ponds Tract is a unique ecological jewel untouched my man, nothing could be further from the truth,” the site says.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Recent Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Incidents

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Adirondack Women in Leadership Forum Sept 28th

adk research consortium

On Wednesday, September 28, 2016, at SUNY Adirondack in Queensbury, the Adirondack Research Consortium will host “Women in Leadership,” a forum to present research, best practices, and case studies involving gender based issues and to engage women in leadership roles in government and business in a related panel discussion.

The goal is to identify future research opportunities and specific actions related to gender. Dr. Kristine Duffy, President, SUNY Adirondack is chair of the event which is being held in partnership with SUNY Adirondack and the Center for Women in Government and Civil Society at the University at Albany. The Women in Leadership Series is sponsored by the Walbridge Fund and the International Paper Foundation. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 19, 2016

Second Cycle Adirondacks Bike Tour Results Reported

cycle adirondacksCycle Adirondacks, a week-long bicycle touring event created by Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), concluded its second-year last month. The event ridership doubled from the first year to more than 300 with 2016 participants traveling from 35 states and provinces to experience the Adirondacks with WCS.

The 2016 route started and finished in Hadley-Lake Luzerne, and included overnight stops in Ticonderoga, Keeseville, Saranac Lake, Indian Lake and Northville. In total, cyclists pedaled through six different counties and 45 communities across a 404-mile journey from August 21-27. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 19, 2016

Willsboro Hardy Grapes Nursery Being Remodeled

Grape GrowersThe cold Hardy Grape Variety Research nursery in Northern New York is getting a make-over.

With new funding from the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program that helped establish the nursery at the Cornell Willsboro Research Farm in Willsboro in 2005, old vines have been removed, the soil is being refreshed, and new varieties of grapes have been selected for planting in 2017.

The evaluation of new varieties has been named a priority by growers associated by the wine grape industry across New York state. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 19, 2016

Bike The Barns Supports North Country Farms

mace chasm farmRegistration is now open for Bike the Barns, a new, fully supported recreational road cycling tour providing a personal connection with the rich agricultural movement of the North Country.

The Saturday, Sept. 24 agritourism event is presented by the Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) and will feature rest stops and interactive experiences at seven farms in the Champlain Valley. Three routes of differing lengths will begin and end at Mace Chasm Farm in Keeseville, where a celebration of local food and music will cap off the day’s activities. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 18, 2016

On Sighting My First Black-Crowned Night-Heron

I’ve canoed all over the Adirondacks without ever seeing a black-crowned night-heron. Last weekend, I finally got to see one. On the Bronx River.

We saw other birds as well, including great blue herons, mallards, gulls, and (I think) cormorants. This being the Bronx, we also saw a lot of trash: plastic bags, soda bottles, an electric fan, a sunken tire.

But the river is much cleaner and more loved than in the past, thanks to a nonprofit organization called the Bronx River Alliance.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 18, 2016

Tobacco Hornworms: Big, Green, and in the Garden

tobacco-hornwormThe big, meaty green caterpillars that many of us have been fighting to eradicate from our gardens this summer make plenty of people squirm. In part it’s because they are among the largest caterpillars in the region, sometimes reaching close to three inches in length, with reddish horns on their ends that look like stingers (but aren’t). They also have voracious appetites and a preference for consuming our tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper plants.

Despite their alien appearance, tobacco hornworms are native insects that contribute to local food chains and eventually transform into beautiful Carolina sphinx moths. These large-bodied moths have five-inch, coffee-colored wings that enable them to hover over flowers like hummingbirds. According to Sam Jaffe, founder of The Caterpillar Lab in Keene, New Hampshire, Carolina sphinx moths have the longest proboscis of any insect in New England, which allow them to probe the deepest flowers. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 17, 2016

American Alpine Club Chronicles Climbing Accidents

2016-accidents-croppedFor those who climb, Accidents in North American Climbing, issued annually by the American Alpine Club, should be required reading—not because climbers are morbid, but because they can learn from others’ mistakes, too many of which are fatal.

The 2016 edition, which was published recently, describes dozens of rock-climbing and mountaineering accidents from the previous year. Most occurred out west or in Alaska. The only incident in the Adirondacks involved a climber who fell on Wallface, a large and remote cliff in the High Peaks Wilderness.

I wrote about the Wallface accident on the Almanack soon after it happened. The climber, a 23-year-old man from Carmel, NY, plummeted 60 to 80 feet after his protection failed to hold on a popular route known as the Diagonal. State forest rangers and volunteer climbers carried out a complicated rescue and managed to get the victim to a hospital that night. He was knocked unconscious in the fall and suffered a deep head gash, but he was able to leave the hospital early the next day.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 17, 2016

Remembering and Honoring Michael Frome, 1920-2016

Michael FromeOne of the world’s most prolific advocacy journalists and a courageous spokesman for America’s natural heritage, Michael Frome, died this month at the age of 96. His last Portogram arrived this week.

Mike Frome’s Portogram arrived in many inboxes as regular commentary about life, current events, wild nature as soul food, and people he admired fighting the good fight against the cold -hearted, the purely corporate, the vested interest, the greedy, and against the dispassionate, “objective” nature writer when a point of view was called for. » Continue Reading.


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