Monday, July 28, 2014

Cathy Dove Named 10th President of Paul Smith’s College

[ANNUAL EVENT TITLE]Cathy Dove, vice president of Cornell NYC Tech in New York City, will become the tenth president of Paul Smith’s College. Dove will succeed John W. Mills, who is retiring after 10 years as president, on September 1st at the college’s first woman president.

As vice president of Cornell Tech since 2012, Dove has lead Cornell University’s efforts to build a new, 2.1-million-square-foot campus for applied sciences on Roosevelt Island in New York City, expected to open in 2017. Dove has served in senior leadership roles at Cornell since 1989. Previous to Cornell Tech, her most recent positions were associate dean of its College of Engineering and, before that, associate dean at the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management. » Continue Reading.



Monday, July 28, 2014

Lawrence Gooley: Peeking Into the Wilds

2aBrBearsFallsAbout a month ago, I wrote here about the educational and entertainment value of live, online wildlife cams and included links to some of the better ones. After all the wonderful sights we’ve seen during the past three weeks, I felt compelled to address the subject once more by mentioning the tremendous opportunity offered by one particular set of cams. If you love the Adirondacks, you have at least a general interest in wildlife, so you’re bound to enjoy this.

Cam technology isn’t perfected yet (glitches include freezes, pixelation, and failures), but when things are working well, it’s often much like watching a live TV show. And as I noted, animals are often sitting around doing pretty much nothing. That doesn’t prevent some folks from monitoring cams hour after hour, but for most of us, the best option is to have browsers open and check them occasionally (or perhaps sign up for alerts on sites that offer them). » Continue Reading.


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Monday, July 28, 2014

Northern Forest Atlas Project Planned

Blue Mountain Lake from Castle Rock (9)The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) recently received a grant from the International Paper Foundation to help publish the Northern Forest Atlas​, which will be released in a series of books, charts, digital applications, and posters documenting the habitats and ecosystems of the Northern Forest (forested areas located in northern New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine).

Jerry Jenkins, WCS ecologist and Atlas project director, is consolidating the enormous body of his ecological research from the past 45 years into a natural history interpretive collection to be released over the next five years. The project is expected to include professionally-designed graphic representations of the natural world to complement existing environmental education programs in the region and be a resource for field studies. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, July 27, 2014

The Roots Of A Classic Adirondack Guide Joke

GHT portraitDid you hear the one about the guide who took his wealthy client out trolling for lake trout? His customer paid more attention to his bottle of whiskey than his fishing line, finishing off the quart while sharing not a drop with the guide. Looking at his empty bottle, the gentleman remarked to his guide, “I am sorry not to have offered you any, but I never let my guide drink on a trip.” To which the guide retorted, “You are quite right sir; one drunk in a boat is enough.”

It is rare that one can trace a joke back to its origins, but in this case, my family is the butt of the joke. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, July 27, 2014

150 Years Ago An Adirondacker Languished At Andersonville

Rollin O. Sanford, farmerRollin O. Sanford died on July 29, 1864 while a prisoner of war at the infamous Andersonville prison in Georgia. His only son, Rollin J, was born that very same day in Hopkinton NY, twelve hundred miles to the north, in what is now the Adirondack Park. While there are countless stories of tragedy and heartache that occurred during the Civil War, this story seemed especially poignant, since it involved our family.

Rollin O. Sanford, described as a large and powerful man, was the tenth child and youngest son of Jonah and Abigail Greene Sanford. He was a farmer in Hopkinton, married to Ermina Roberts, with whom he had two daughters, Lillian and Jeanette. “Nettie”, the younger daughter, died in November 1863 at age two, one month before Rollin went off to war. Years later Lillian wrote about the death of her little sister and how her father “held Nettie in his arms as her little life went out”. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, July 27, 2014

An Adirondack Sunrise From Algonquin Peak

Adirondack Sunrise

Sometimes you just get lucky. Waking up at 2 am to hike Algonquin Peak to watch the sunrise is always a bit of gamble. I’ve done it on several occasions and more than once I arrived on the summit only to find the entire view obscured in clouds. Weather forecasts are only reliable to a certain extent in the mountains. On this particular day the view was clear, except for distance clouds on the eastern horizon. This had the effect of filtering much of the sunlight, allowing one to observe the sun in great detail. I was glad I had brought a short telephoto lens with me this morning as the composition with the hills in the foreground was much more compelling than a wide angle view.



Saturday, July 26, 2014

Benjamin Harrison’s 1895 Flag Speech

1895 Forge House flag raisingDuring ex-President Benjamin Harrison’s first summer stay in 1895 at Dodd’s Camp, he gave a rare public address commemorating the raising of a new 112 foot flagstaff holding an 18 x 24 foot flag.  This address, given on a rainy July 27, 1895 afternoon, was later printed in the Lowville Journal & Republican. Though the language is somewhat dated, its sentiments are just as inspirational today when we consider the struggles our diverse republic faces as a free nation.

Place yourself on the Old Forge dock facing, perhaps in the Forge Motel direction, and imagine a rainy day (not too difficult), a large flag and a former President with a long historical family tradition.  Listen as Benjamin Harrison rises to speak…Oh, an interruption as Riley Parsons gets the crowd to give a “tiger” cheer.  Then Harrison speaks, without the benefits of a wireless microphone… » Continue Reading.



Saturday, July 26, 2014

NYCO Commentary: How Much Wollastonite Is There?

WollastoniteLast week, as a part of a larger effort to document the aftermath of Proposition 5 – the so-called NYCO Amendment – I wrote a column comparing claims made about NYCO in support of the amendment to the factual record.

I listed the following five claims we’ve heard repeatedly (remember, not all claims are NYCO’s responsibility; some claims were made by others):

Claim One: NYCO is a local company headquartered in Willsboro. It has been there for more than fifty years and employs about a hundred people. » Continue Reading.



Friday, July 25, 2014

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


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Friday, July 25, 2014

Ed Kanze: The Bloodletting

ed_kanze_bloodlettingThe day began with a mosquito attacking me before I got out of bed, and it went downhill from there. Cheer yourself up by listening to my tale of woe about a long day during the Adirondack bug season, when mosquitoes provide the wake-up call, blackflies and deerflies assault you for hours, and no-see-ums gnaw you to sleep in this week’s edition of All Things Natural with Ed Kanze.

The podcast is produced by Mountain Lake PBS’s Josh Clement. Listen to past episodes by visiting Mountain Lake PBS’s Borderless North webpage at mountainlake.org/bn.



Friday, July 25, 2014

25th Lake Placid Summit Lacrosse Classic

Lake Placid LacrosseLake Placid Lacrosse is hosting more than 245 teams playing in 18 divisions of competition during the 25th Annual Lake Placid Summit Lacrosse Classic, August 4-10 at the North Elba Show Grounds. More than 5,000 people are expected at the event. The film “America’s First Game”, followed by a lacrosse symposium, will be shown at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on Tuesday night, Aug. 5, at 7:30 pm.

Lacrosse is a Native American contact sport, originally played with large teams (100 to 1,000 or more) over a third of a mile field from sunup to sundown for days. Lacrosse was part of ceremonial ritual first described in writing in 1637 by Jean de Brébeuf, a French Jesuit missionary among the Mohawk in present day New York. Today it is a widely popular sport with of teams of 12, especially in the Eastern United States and Canada. » Continue Reading.



Friday, July 25, 2014

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


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Thursday, July 24, 2014

Adirondack Insects: The Stable Fly

Stomoxys_calcitrans_on_aloe_veraDuring summer, both residents and visitors of the Adirondacks should be required to spend time on the water, preferably in a canoe, kayak or guideboat in order to experience the serenity and magnificence of slowly and silently moving across our fresh water environments. However, traveling over the surface of most waterways in a small, open, human-powered craft from July through mid August does have its cost, as people in such boats are occasionally subject to the harassment of a small, fast-moving fly inclined to bite on the upper part of the foot, or the lower section of an uncovered leg, particularly around the ankle. This unwelcome pest is most likely a species of stable fly (Stomoxys), a genus of flies belonging to the same family as the common house fly.

Stable flies are slightly more robust, yet smaller than the house fly, and are a little lighter in color. Additionally, stable flies are far more wary, as they are quick to burst into flight when something approaches them. Hitting one with a fly swatter is a far greater challenge than smacking the more sluggish house fly with the same long-handled instrument. And lacking a fly swatter in a boat can lead to great frustration, as it is impossible to kill these pests with any other object, other than the spray from a can of highly potent pesticide. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 24, 2014

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (July 24)

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This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. A narrative version of this report can be found at Mountain Lake PBS.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 24, 2014

The Chateau On The Lake In Bolton Landing

photo 5(2)The Chateau On The Lake, one of Bolton Landing’s newest fine dining restaurants, has simply fantastic food, on point service, a beautiful view, and a great atmosphere. Originally a boathouse on the lake, the building was moved up hill and converted into the home of Hugh Allen Wilson, a talented musician. After Wilson’s death in 2010, the house was purchased by Ed and Jennifer Foy who converted it into The Chateau and brought in Chefs Shaun Hazlitt, Tyren Crain and Bert R. Soto.

The culinary creations change frequently throughout the seasons, but one item that has become an instant favorite is the Cheese and Charcuterie Board for Two.  The Board consist of a variety of five cheeses and five meats such as Stilton, Manchango, Montchevre Goat, a triple crème imported brie, Prosciutto di Parma, Australian Speck, Soppressata and hot Italian Capicolla. The board is garnished with tear drop peppers, green pitta queen & Kalamata olives, toasted Pistachios, a garlic rubbed Crostini, and heirloom tomato jam. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 24, 2014

Cabaret Singer To Perform ‘The Sagamore Songbook’

Andrea Marcovicci photo by Daniel Reichert (2)Noted cabaret vocalist Andrea Marcovicci will be visiting Great Camp Sagamore to perform a special program celebrating the noted American Songbook composers who stayed at Sagamore Lodge:   Richard Rogers, Jerome Kern and Hoagy Carmichael.

Marcovicci’s performance will be part of the camp’s 2014 benefit for historic preservation. Proceeds from the benefit help with the ongoing restoration of the Sagamore’s 27 National Historic Landmark structures.   The benefit will be on Saturday, August 2nd and will include cocktails and a silent auction at the camp’s play house, followed by Andrea Marcovvici’s performance and a catered sit down dinner and live auction. The evening will be capped with cigars, port, and a camp fire. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, July 24, 2014

Lake George Village To Finally Tackle Wastewater Problem

lg, south basinSince the 1970s, scientists and officials have been aware that the Lake George Waste Water Treatment plant has been discharging unacceptably high levels of nitrates through ground water, into West Brook and ultimately, into Lake George.

“Nitrates are probably the single, biggest influence on the water quality in the West Brook watershed, and the treatment plant is the single largest source of nitrates,” says Lake George Waterkeeper Chris Navitsky.

According to Navitsky, excessive levels of nitrate stimulate the growth of weeds and algae and can endanger fish life, the quality of drinking water, recreation and even human health.  “Fortunately, we haven’t reached that level yet,” he said, adding that after Lake George Village completes the second phase of improvements to its waste water treatment plant, which it has committed itself to undertaking after being cited by the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation, we won’t. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 23, 2014

A New Interactive Map Of Washington County

WaCoScreenShot

Washington County launched a wonderful interactive webmap a couple months ago.

Created for the county by Jimapco in Round Lake, NY, the map is user friendly and playful, and includes amenities such as dining, lodging and services as well as attractions like covered bridges, agri-tourism and arts.  It also includes several ‘tours’ in and around the county, including fiber, maple, beverage (aka wine and beer!) and walking and bike tours for selected locations.   This map has several other nice features like dropdown lists for each layer that allow you to quickly zoom to attractions and information packed popups that will even give you driving directions. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Frances Beinecke To Receive 2014 Hochschild Award

Frances BeineckeThe Board of Trustees of the Adirondack Museum has announced its selection of Frances Beinecke as recipient of the 2014 Harold K. Hochschild Award.   The Adirondack Museum will formally present the award to her during its Wilderness Elegance Benefit Gala, to be held on the museum campus from 6 to 9 p.m. this Saturday, July 26.

The Harold K. Hochschild Award is dedicated to the memory of the museum’s founder, whose passion for the Adirondacks, its people, and environment inspired the creation of the Adirondack Museum and the establishment of the Adirondack Park Agency. Since 1990, the museum has presented the award to a wide range of intellectual and community leaders throughout the Adirondack Park, highlighting their contributions to the region’s culture and quality of life. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Ironman Isn’t The Only Adirondack Triathlon

MiniTri_JenniMcGrewDuring the summer triathlon season my family spend a lot of time watching for athletes on local roads. It makes for great people watching. My children are trained to look for weaving bicyclists around sharp corners. Though participating in a triathlon isn’t for everyone, spectating and cheering on the athletes that do, is a sport in itself.

We have volunteered at one Lake Placid Ironman, passed out water at a Tupper Lake Tinman and managed to cheer on a few friends dedicated to finishing both courses. While some Adirondack triathlons have concluded, the 2nd oldest Ironman Triathlon in North America is gearing up to be held once again in Lake Placid on July 27th. » Continue Reading.



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