Saturday, July 30, 2016

Ranger Bowback: Recycling Long Ago

Ranger Bowback Cover - Adirondack FarmHow fashions do change. Years ago we were thought to be the oddballs because of the togs we wore. We were taught to wear long sleeves. Many dresses coming into style in our younger days had short sleeves, so we wore shirts or blouses with long sleeves under our dresses. Maybe we were not in style then, but with today’s layered look many women are wearing similar outfits. » Continue Reading.

Friday, July 29, 2016

The Passing of Adirondack Guide Brett Lawrence

Brett Lawrence rowing a guideboat on Lower Ausable Lake, photo by Rebecca SoderholmAdirondack Guide Smith Brett Lawrence passed away on Thursday, June 30, every bit as much an icon of Keene, NY as Giant Mountain, Noonmark Diner, and the old red barn at the bottom of Spruce Hill (at the junction of routes 73 and 9N).

His full white beard and his red truck from which he flew the American flag gave Brett presence. He was also one of the last visages of an era that stretches back to the early days of the 19th century, and of a family that for four generations made their living as a guide and caretaker. » Continue Reading.

Friday, July 29, 2016

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week

Friday, July 29, 2016

New Leadership For Lake Champlain Basin Program

Eric Howe - LCBP DirectorThe New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC) and the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP) have announced that Dr. Eric A. Howe has accepted the position of program director of the LCBP, replacing Dr. William (Bill) Howland who retired in June after seventeen years. Howe has worked on water quality and watershed management issues in the Lake Champlain basin for nearly 20 years; for the past seven years he has served as Technical Coordinator for LCBP.

As the program director for LCBP, Howe is expected to work to administer a federally-funded program designed to protect and preserve Lake Champlain and its bi-state and bi-national watershed through partnerships that conserve and restore natural resources, promote the use of sound science to support management decisions, enhance water quality, and promote community involvement and stewardship. Howe will also serve as director of the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership, a federally recognized Heritage Program and subprogram of LCBP whose focus is to increase knowledge and appreciation of the area’s cultural heritage, outdoor recreational opportunities, and historic landmarks. » Continue Reading.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Recent Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Incidents

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.

Friday, July 29, 2016

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Erastus Hudson and the Lindbergh Baby Case (Part 2)

2A LadderLindberghHouseOn March 13, 1932 Erastus Hudson of Plattsburgh was asked to visit the crime scene in the Charles Lindbergh home to secure whatever evidence he might produce. First using the standard dusting process, which was best for solid surfaces, he found no prints in the nursery on any items that had already been checked, confirming Kelly’s results, but he did find thirteen on the baby’s books and toys. These were extremely valuable because the baby had been born at home, and thus no fingerprints had been taken. Those gathered by Hudson were the only means of identifying the baby for certain—if he were ever found.

Turning his attention to the ladder that had yielded no prints to police experts, Hudson spent a couple of days applying his innovative process. He estimated collecting “more than 500 fingerprints and fragments, some of which were sufficient to be of value.” » Continue Reading.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondacks (July 28)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is issued each Thursday afternoon and can be heard at North Country Public Radio on Friday mornings.

Sunrise Saturday in Lake Placid will be at 5:42 am; sunset at 8:22 pm, providing 14 hours and 38 minutes of sunlight. The Moon will rise at 2:34 am Saturday and set at 5:36 pm. The Moon will be Waning Crescent, 12% illuminated. There will be dark nights this weekend as the moon will only be up during the early morning and daytime hours and there will be a New Moon on Tuesday.

Perseid Meteor Shower: Earth has entered the stream of debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle, which is the source of the annual Perseid Meteor Shower. This year the meteor shower is expected to be heavier than normal, with forecasters calling for as many as 200 per hour during the peak, August 11-13.


» Continue Reading.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Hiker Neil Luckhurst Raising Money For Search and Rescue

Bennys Brook_0003A Montreal man is using a thru-hike through the High Peaks to raise funds for a local search and rescue organization.

Neil Luckhurst said he plans to start his hike on August 5 in the Dix Mountain Range and continue for 16 days until he finishes up in the Sentinel Mountain Range. Money raised through the trip will go to Lower Adirondack Search and Rescue, which is based in the southern Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

History Tour Across Lake Champlain Bridge July 31

crown point 1930On July 31, 2016, at 1 pm, a guided history walk across the Lake Champlain Bridge will be held. Attendees will meet at the Crown Point State Historic Site museum nestled between two colonial forts on the New York side of the bridge for the start of the tour. Allow at least two hours for this walk back and forth across the bridge.

Participants can learn about nearly 9,000 years of human history at this important and beautiful location on Lake Champlain. The channel with its peninsulas, or points, on each side made it one of the most strategic spots on Lake Champlain for the Native Americans for millennia, and for the French, British, and early Americans in the 17th and 18th centuries. » Continue Reading.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Plattsburgh Farmers and Crafters Market Kids Day Saturday

PlattsburghFamersKidsDayFive years ago Plattsburgh Farmers and Crafters Market co-manager Bonnie Gonyo started the annual Kids Day as a way to introduce the local farmer market to visitors and area residents. The event has grown bigger and better each year, adding activities and giveaways for children of all ages.

“This is our fifth anniversary so we have some special things planned,” says Gonyo. “I start planning this event in February. It takes time because we bring in a variety of organizations from the Girls Scouts to Mountain Lake PBS. This year we have a little 5th anniversary tote bag for the kids. It was illustrated by Speedy Arnold who also plays the guitar and writes his own music. I’m so excited to see those dancing veggies on the tote bag.” » Continue Reading.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Adirondack Murray Inspires Local Whiskey, Rye and Vodka

A vintage poster reminds us of the celebrity of W.H.H. MurrayRandall Beach, an Albany attorney who grew up in Plattsburgh, has always been fascinated by W.H. H. Murray and the role that he played in opening the Adirondacks to tourism.

And with good reason. The New England cleric was a great-great grandfather on his father’s side.

With access to family papers, many of them never seen before, Beach is writing Murray’s biography. The last biography, published in 1905, was written by Harry Radford, better known for his efforts to re-introduce the moose and the beaver to the Adirondacks and for his death at the hands of his guides in Alaska. » Continue Reading.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Wood Nymphs In The Garden

the outsider wood nymphBy mid-July, the oregano in my herb garden has grown tall and tatty, and I want nothing more than to cut it back into a tidy mound. But I don’t. Doing so would deprive the flurry of common wood nymph butterflies that swarm the plants every year. The messiness is a small price to pay for the sight of them flitting around en masse.

I have learned to expect their arrival, having witnessed it every summer, since I planted gardens around my home six years ago. At first, just one or two appear, but within days there are dozens. Soon, the oregano’s purple flowers are covered in butterflies. But this brief visit is a only a part of the story of the common wood nymph butterfly (Cercyonis pegala). What are they doing for the other eleven and a half months of the year?

Not much, it turns out. At least, not at first. » Continue Reading.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Fire Tower Family Day At Essex Museum Saturday

adk fire towerThe Adirondack History Museum will present its Adirondack Fire Tower program for families on Saturday, July 30 from 9 am – 3 pm.

The program features a presentation by museum educator David Thomas-Train at the museum building, and will include a hike up Poke-O- Moonshine.

The free program for families explores the history and ongoing role of fire towers in regional land stewardship. Participants should bring a bagged lunch, and be prepared to hike the mountain. The program is recommended for students in the fourth to eighth grade level. » Continue Reading.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Dave Gibson: Testing Gov Cuomo’s Wilderness Convictions

Wallface, Henderson Mtn from Goodnow Mtn firetowerWill the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and Adirondack Park Agency write to urge the U.S. Congress not to gut the federal Wilderness Act of 1964? Would Governor Cuomo allow this or encourage it?

Why should these state agencies write to Senators McConnell, Schumer and Gilllibrand to strongly oppose a bill that opens up all federal Wilderness areas to bicycling? Our Adirondack State Land Master Plan echoes the federal Wilderness Act of 1964. Bicycling in Wilderness areas is disallowed in our federal and Adirondack Wilderness (and Primitive, Canoe) areas because bikes are gear-leveraged mechanical transport, a highly complex machine, just not a motorized one. And machines – motorized or not – cancel out the values and benefits of an enduring wilderness, those very rare places where human beings exercise humility and are not allowed to dominate the landscape as we do everywhere else on earth. » Continue Reading.

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