Monday, March 2, 2015

2 Notorious Guides In Adirondack History

P326ABefore railroads and automobiles, travelers depended on the quality and skills of North Woods guides to show them the region’s natural beauty, to feed them and provide the best in hunting and fishing.  Often, guides were entrusted with taking ladies in the woods.

The guides, especially those not aligned with large hotels, depended on per diem fees for subsistence and quality reputations for honesty, dependability and woodcraft benefited all guides.  So when two guides brought dishonor to the profession, guides hoped people realized these two were the exception. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 2, 2015

Lake George Group Presents Greenway Proposal

Cleverdale Lake Geroge Archival PhotoNot that long ago, or at least within living memory, Cleverdale on the east side of Lake George was home to fewer than five year-round families; the children attended a one-room school house on Ridge Road. A common footpath followed the shore, allowing residents to walk to church in summer.

Modern times, however, came quickly enough. Lakefront residents appropriated the sections of footpath that crossed their lawns. New York State acquired 28 acres on Sandy Bay and planned to build a public beach and picnic area there, a prospect so alarming to local residents, they sought to purchase the tract themselves. Eventually, the state reconsidered, perhaps as a result of pressure applied by some politically well-connected locals, and the land is still undeveloped. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 1, 2015

Adirondack Lake Trout At Risk

Adirondack Lake TroutIn one traditional method of lake-trout fishing, an angler holds in his or her hand a weighted line while trolling from a boat. To collect the line, the angler uses a jerry-rigged Victrola record player with a spool in the middle.

“As they pulled in the line, they turned on their [hand-cranked] Victrola,” said Joe Hackett, a fishing guide from Ray Brook. “Lake-trout fishing is so specialized. That’s something you learn from your father, or uncle, or grandfather.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 28, 2015

Tips for Game Camera Success

TOS.gamecameraillustrationMy town had the job of removing a dead beaver from a culvert pipe cage, a rather sad and odorous affair, but also an opportunity. I alerted the usual suspects – there’s nothing like a rotting carcass to bring camera trappers together – and we moved the body into the woods and set up a few cameras.

We placed the body in mature forest near the wetland. We figured that just about any of our meso-carnivores might appear: coyote, fox, fisher, and bobcat were all possibilities. We didn’t get the bobcat, but we did get the others, and the fisher photos were especially nice. » Continue Reading.


Friday, February 27, 2015

In Honor of “French Louie Day”

250px-Adirondack_French_Louie_(Louis_Seymour)_(1833-1915)Last fall, while researching the history of Perkins Clearing and the West Canada Lake Wilderness for part four of my history on the State Land Master Plan, I came across a newspaper article published in the Fulton County Republican on February 4, 1909. The unnamed correspondent had interviewed several Adirondack trappers for the purpose of describing the solitary nature of their chosen occupation – and how their lifestyle was starting to conflict with the modernity of the twentieth century. Among the trappers he spoke with was 75-year-old Louie Seymour, called here “French Lewey.”

At the time this article was written, a profound flux in the way society perceived the Adirondack wilderness was in progress. The Adirondack Park was seventeen years old, fish and game laws were gaining teeth, and a series of devastating fires was about to convince New York State to take a more active role in the management of the region. By comparison, when these men entered the woods as youths the wilderness was considered a “no man’s land” where many of the rules of civilization didn’t always apply. Squatting was a way of life, and no one was counting the amount of venison in your pot or the trout on your line. » Continue Reading.


Friday, February 27, 2015

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


Friday, February 27, 2015

7 Adirondack Stories For Black History Month


Friday, February 27, 2015

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, February 26, 2015

Friday Declared ‘French Louie’ Seymour Day

young-louie-300The Herkimer County Legislature has named Friday “French Louie Day” in honor of the noted French-Canadian Adirondacker Louis Seymour. A celebration is planned for Saturday in the Town of Inlet.

Friday marks the 100th anniversary of the death of Seymour, who made the wilderness between Inlet and Lake Pleasant his home from the 1860s until his death in Newton’s Corners (now Speculator) on February 27, 1915.  Seymour’s name became legend after the 1952 biography Adirondack French Louie: Life in the North Woods by Utica author Harvey Dunham, which portrayed him as a man of hard work, determination and humor.  » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 26, 2015

Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondacks (Feb 26)

CompassThis weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

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SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.


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