Saturday, June 28, 2014

Raquette Lake: Why ‘Indian’ Point?

Stoddard from CragsWriting  in The Adirondack; or Life in the Woods (1849) Joel Tyler Headley remarked that Indian Point on Raquette Lake was so-named “because there was once an Indian settlement upon it”.  But until recently, the idea of large, permanent Native American settlements within the Adirondacks has been discounted by scholars. Ongoing research however, suggests that may not be the case.

On thing we do know for sure is that Adirondack interior was a seasonal hunting ground for the Iroquoian and Algonquin-speaking communities and there is considerable evidence that the Raquette Lake area was used extensively by the Mohawk.  » Continue Reading.



Friday, June 27, 2014

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


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Friday, June 27, 2014

Earthjustice Seeks Info On Routes Of Oil Trains

Rail accident in Lac Megantic, Quebec in 2013 (Wikimedia photo)The environmental organization Earthjustice is asking authorities to disclose the routes of trains that transport Bakken crude oil through New York State.

Earthjustice attorney Christopher Amato filed the freedom-of-information request Thursday with the state Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Emergency Management on behalf of several environmental groups, including Adirondack Wild and the Sierra Club.

Amato is seeking all records submitted by rail carriers regarding the oil-transport routes as well as any requests by the carriers to keep such records secret.

» Continue Reading.



Friday, June 27, 2014

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


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Thursday, June 26, 2014

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (June 26)

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This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. A narrative version of this report can be found at Mountain Lake PBS.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.



Thursday, June 26, 2014

The Old Forge Company:
Rise Of A Transportation Monopoly

Old Forge Co Stock Cert002A quick look at an Old Forge town map reveals streets named Garmon, Crosby, Adams, Gilbert and Sheard.  These are the oldest streets in town except for Main Street (Route 28), originally an extension of the Brown’s Tract Road.

The “main drag” was briefly named Harrison Avenue for former President Benjamin Harrison, the region’s most famous camper.  But this name was dropped from the maps of the Adirondack Development Corporation in the first part of the 20th century.

Recently, the Goodsell Musuem has been permitted by the Town of Webb to reinstate “Harrison Avenue” with a sign at the corner of Gilbert and Route 28.

Except for Main Street, these streets were created by the Old Forge Company, often called the Old Forge Improvement Company.  When its Directors established building lots through the woods of the Forge Tract, they assigned these names to the streets on the first village map filed in July 1896 with the Herkimer County Clerk.  What follows is part of a history of the Old Forge Company from its inception to 1899. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, June 26, 2014

Jay Mountain Wilderness: Not Exactly A Walk In The Park

Jay Mountain RangeThey say variety is the spice of life. This is certainly true of backcountry adventures as anything else. Every few years, I diverge from my comfort area of the Five Ponds and Pepperbox Wilderness and venture out into other parts of the Adirondacks. Recently, I took a six-day sojourn into the Jay Mountain Wilderness, the smallest Wilderness Area in the Adirondacks.

The main impetuous for the trip was my desire to see Lot 8 in all its unspoiled glory, before saw, drill, bulldozer and explosives leave it nothing more than a giant hole in the ground. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, June 26, 2014

North Country Arts Center Opens ‘ART in Bloom’ Show

GalleryNorth Country Arts Center has opened its summer show “ART in Bloom” which runs through Saturday, July 26, and closes with a reception from 2 to 4 p.m on the last day of the show. The Art in Chestertown Gallery is located at 6378 State Route 9 in Chestertown, New York.

The gallery is open Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This show features more than 45 artists from across the region, with books, cards, scarves, jewelry, fiber art, drawings, sculpture, paintings, photographs, woodworking and other unique one-of-a-kind gifts. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Snails: Slime is Sublime

TOS_snailOnce, hiking on the west coast, I picked up a big, bright yellow banana slug from the forest floor and brought it to my wife. She remembers that too – vividly.

Ok, ok, I know, snails and slugs have a high yuck factor. But take a moment and really watch one. You’ll see an intricately evolved creature of almost fluid grace.

Snails and slugs ­­– basically a slug is a snail without a shell – are gastropods, meaning “belly-footed.” There are tens of thousands of species worldwide. And while there are no banana slugs in this part of the country, ninety-plus species of snails ooze across northern fields and forests. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Training Set on Controlling Common Invasive Plants

Terrestrial-Training-North-CreekThe growing season is underway and with it comes troublesome invasive plants. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is hosting a free training session that provides landowners with instruction on how to control unwanted infestations of invading plants, such as Japanese knotweed and garlic mustard.

Participants will learn how to identify common invasive terrestrial plants and how to apply effective management techniques on their own lands. The training will include presentations and in-field demonstrations. Landowners, landscapers, gardeners, resource managers and highway department staff are encouraged to attend. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 25, 2014

In Hamilton County, A Giant Hogweed Alert

Giant hogweed has white, umbrella-shaped flowers.  Photo courtesy of the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.  It was a hot August day and Lenny and I had the truck windows rolled down as we hunted for a home address in Speculator. We were following up on the identification of a poisonous invasive plant.

“I bet it’s cow parsnip,” said Lenny.

“That’s the house number. Turn here,” I pointed.

I hopped out and gaped at the plant. It towered above my height of 5 feet 9 inches. The leaves were enormous. I walked up to take a closer look saw hairy stems blotched with purple.

“It’s giant hogweed,” frowned Lenny. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Free Fishing Weekend Around New York State

fishing_inlet_newNew York State Free Fishing Days will take place this weekend, June 28-29 allowing anyone to fish in NYS waters without a license. This annual event started in 1991 to encourage people to try fishing. Since my husband already has his fishing license and my children aren’t required to have one, we use the annual Free Fishing Days as an opportunity to introduce visitors or our non-fishing friends to the sport.

Annually the Department of Environmental Education holds a series of free fishing clinics that not only allow all ages to experience fishing, but also participate in workshops that assist with fish identification, equipment, techniques, angling ethics and aquatic ecology. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Newcomb AIC Introduces Artist-in-Residence Program

Artist at the AICScientists are not the only ones working in the forest this summer at the Newcomb Campus of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF). Artist Frances Gaffney, who frequently uses the Adirondacks as a backdrop and source of inspiration, is the first artist in residence at the Adirondack Interpretive Center (AIC), the site of public outreach at the Newcomb Campus. She will work out of the AIC through August, creating pieces inspired by the local landscape and leading public workshops and demonstrations.

Gaffney has recently begun a series of paintings titled “Feeling is the Prayer”. As detailed in her artist statement, these paintings reflect the possibility that “our intentions are a form of prayer and that prayer succeeds only by experiencing the intent of the prayer as if it has already occurred.” She will work on this series during her residency at the AIC. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Jessica Tabora: Crane Mountain Summit

Crane mountain

The trails were busy this weekend with perfect hiking conditions. Crane Mountain is a popular hike to views of the Southern Adirondacks. The trailhead is located on Ski Hi Road in Thurman. You can take the route via the pond or the shorter route directly to the summit. You will notice quite a few paths to great views along the way.



Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Adirondack Architectural Heritage Hosting Santanoni Tours

image001(9)Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) will host four tours of Great Camp Santanoni in Newcomb. Built for Robert and Anna Pruyn of Albany beginning in 1892, Santanoni eventually included 12,900 acres and nearly four-dozen buildings.

The first tour will be held this Saturday, June 28, 2014. There will be three additional tours on July 25, August 16, and September 5th.

The tours will be led by AARCH director Steven Engelhart. The day will include stops at the Gate Lodge, the 200-acre farm, and the Main Camp on Newcomb Lake where we will see ongoing restoration and learn about the conservation planning and restoration work. The Santanoni Preserve is owned by New York State, is on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a National Historic Landmark. AARCH has long been associated with the protection, interpretation and restoration of this regional treasure. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 24, 2014

2013 Adirondack Leisure Travel Study Results

Entering Adirondack ParkVisitors to the region were drawn by outdoor recreation, preferred hotel accommodations to other types of lodging, and spent $93 for every occupancy tax dollar spent on marketing in 2013, according to the latest leisure travel information study.

For the eleventh year in a row, the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) contracted an independent third party to conduct a Leisure Travel Information Study. For the last three years, ROOST engaged PlaceMaking to conduct the survey applying the same methodology as in the previous years when it was conducted by the Technical Assistance Center at SUNY Plattsburgh. Survey data from 2013 visitors show record visitation to Essex County from across the decade of this research. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 23, 2014

Jessica Ferguson: Mirror Girl of Saranac Lake

tb-patientMirror Girl. What an intriguing term. In the past, it has been applied to the prettiest coeds in sororities, cute girls in general, and particularly vain women. But in this case, it addresses one of my favorite historical stories linked to the North Country’s years as a tuberculosis treatment center. The patient was a young woman, Jessica “Jessie” Ferguson, born in 1895 in Mount Pleasant, New York, north of Tarrytown on the Hudson River. Her parents, James and Anna, were both natives of Scotland, a fact that becomes key to the story.

The young girl’s difficulties began in her early twenties when her father died, and Jessica was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the bone, affecting her spine. In 1918, she lost the ability to walk. Doctors placed her in a cast that forced Jessica into a permanent reclining position.

In the early 1920s, Anna Ferguson moved her daughter to Saranac Lake, where they settled into a cottage on Riverside Drive on the shores of Lake Flower. Jessica’s situation was different from most patients, for the majority suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis, which affected the lungs. The vision most of us conjure is of patients on porches to benefit from the fresh air, something Jessica was unable to do. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 23, 2014

Adirondack Birds: The Common Yellowthroat

799px-Common_Yellowthroat_by_Dan_PancamoThe overwhelming abundance of pesky insects in and around aquatic areas in the Adirondacks from late spring through mid summer can discourage travel to these picturesque settings, however, the hordes of bothersome bugs that thrive in wetlands help support the rich diversity of life that occurs around these places.

Among the birds that seek out mosquito, black fly, and deer fly infested streams, swamps and shrubby lake shores is a common and vocal warbler whose voice regularly echoes across these watery habitats. Despite its small size and effective protective coloration, the common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) can be seen by anyone passing through its domain as it bellows out its characteristic song from a perch that temporarily makes this Adirondack resident fairly conspicuous. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 23, 2014

Noted Monarch Scientist At Wild Center On Thursday

LPB_headshot3_Jun07On his way to becoming an internationally recognized scientist for his work on Monarch butterflies and the evolution of warning coloration in nature, Professor Lincoln Brower first tickled the funny bone of the scientific community with his elegant research and photos of “barfing blue jays” and proved that milkweed toxin protects Monarchs.

As a young scientist at Amherst College in the 1960s, Dr. Brower proved that the toxin that Monarchs ingest from feeding on milkweed plants as caterpillars is so potent at sickening birds that a blue jay once exposed to them in a careful lab experiment, and then given other foods for a month, would vomit at the sight of a Monarch. Dr. Brower’s photos of the unlucky jays, published in the Scientific American in February 1969, still circulate on the internet.

Adirondack residents will have the chance to hear Dr. Brower discuss that famous experiment and his subsequent decades of research on Monarch biology as well as the current threats to their survival in a lecture at The Wild Center, 7:30. p.m. Thursday, June 26. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 23, 2014

NYS Aquatic Invasive Species Control Legislation Passed

nycapitolLegislation passed at the bitter end of the 2014 NYS Legislative Session included a historic bill that will help transition New York to a greater focus on the prevention and interdiction of aquatic invasive species (AIS). This bill was carried by Assembly member Barbara Lifton from Ithaca and Senator Thomas O’Mara from Chemung County. Both have communities engaged in trying to stop the spread of hydrilla (hydrilla verticillata) on Cayuga Lake and elsewhere. Adirondack legislators all supported this bill and Dan Stec was one of the Assembly co-sponsors.

This bill is important for the Adirondacks because we still have many lakes and ponds that are not yet infested with AIS. While the list of infested waters grows and the number of AIS increases, we now have an important new tool to try and stop the spread. The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) finalized rules this month that prohibits the launching of boats with any visible plant or animal matter or standing water at DEC boat launches and fishing access sites. This is important but limited. This new legislation will allow the DEC to develop similar regulations for all public, private and commercial boat launches across the state. » Continue Reading.



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