Thursday, July 13, 2017

Wooden Canoe Heritage Association Assembly Underway

The Lily, built in 1915With the widespread use of plastic canoes, it seems as if the art of building wood canoes is all but lost. However, one organization refuses to let the craft die.

The Wooden Canoe Heritage Association is holding its 38th annual gathering at Paul Smith’s College this week.

“People come to show boats and talk about how they restored them,” said Rob Stevens, the association’s program coordinator.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 13, 2017

DEC Conducting Survey of Freshwater Anglers

DEC will be conducting a survey of licensed anglers who fished New York waters in 2017. This survey will be conducted primarily online and participants with valid e-mail addresses will be selected at random from their sporting license database. If you have not already provided your e-mail address when you purchased your license and want to be considered for the survey, e-mail DEC your name, fishing license ID # and e-mail address.


Thursday, July 13, 2017

Loon Center Open House Coincides with WCS Loon Census

With its black and white markings, haunting call, and bright red eyes, the Common Loon is one the most recognizable animals in the Adirondacks. As a top aquatic predator, the loon is also an indicator of a healthy ecosystem. This year marks the 17th annual Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Loon Census, which has helped track environmental toxins, disease, climate change, and habitat loss by monitoring these iconic birds.

Though Saturday’s Loon Census is organized by WCS, the organization relies on volunteer citizen scientists to help with field work. Individuals are encouraged to sign up to monitor a specific lake by canoe or by foot to count the loons and chicks on July 15 between 8-9 am. This event, as with other Citizen Scientist projects, puts important data in front of scientists while allowing participants to learn more about loons. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 13, 2017

New Viticulture Specialist Serving Southeastern Adks

jim meyersThe Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Program of Cornell Cooperative Extension has announced the hiring of James Meyers as the new viticulture and wine specialist for a 17-county region in the eastern part of New York State. Meyers will provide regional grape growers with a combination of on-the-ground grape production assistance and some high flying technology.

Meyers earned his PhD in Viticulture at Cornell University and has applied a Masters degree in Computer Science from Brown University to his viticultural research. Using satellite imaging and drone technology, Meyers has mapped canopy and vineyard variability to help growers in the Finger Lakes region of New York and in the state of California optimize the efficiency and profitability of their vineyard operations. He will continue the use of that technology in eastern New York. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Finding New Ways To Avoid Adirondack Roadkill

RoadkillMany of us are familiar with the guilt of hitting an animal while driving. The way that its body weight seems to travel through the frame of the car is difficult to forget.

But the fact remains that we have places to be and even a few well-intentioned road signs cannot slow us down. In our ceaseless efforts to connect our world, we don’t always consider the ways that our road network has fragmented the animal habitats it paves over.

The unpleasant task of shoveling the battered carrion from our roadways falls to local highway departments. But what exactly happens to the bodies from there? I reached out to representatives from a few local county highway departments and it turns out their methods vary, but most are taken to landfills or compost bins. Scavengers remove many of these animals before road crews have a chance to clear the roads, a valuable but underappreciated ecosystem service provided by crows, ravens, foxes, and the like.

A study published in the New Zealand Journal of Zoology found that seasonal peaks in road kill for specific species was dependent upon breeding periods and dispersal. Deer and moose are particularly vulnerable to vehicle collisions during their fall mating seasons, according to a representative for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Disseminating information on these predictable changes in animal behavior provides some aid, but the number of incidents remains troubling. This suggests that accommodating for animal behavior could be more effective than attempting to educate human drivers. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Montcalm’s Cross Battle Re-enactment July 22-23th

Fort Ticonderoga Recreates the Epic 1758 Battle of Carillon: Montcalm’s Cross On July 22 and 23, Fort Ticonderoga July will host a battle re-enactment highlighting the 1758 Battle of Carillon during the French and Indian War. Visitors will learn how the British amassed the largest army in North American history to date, yet was defeated by a French army a quarter of its size.

Highlighted programming featured throughout the weekend brings to life the story of the French soldiers that protected their lines of defense. Visitors will meet the British and Provincial soldiers who fought to drive the French from the rocky peninsula and fortress of Carillon, later named Ticonderoga. Recreated French and British armies will maneuver in battle re-enactments each day. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Poke-O-Moonshine Fire Tower Marking 100 Years

Poke-O-Moonshine Fire TowerThey started put being paid $60 a month for their half-year, all-weather stints in the fire tower. Overall, there were twenty-one Fire Observers on Poke-O-Moonshine from 1912 through 1988. Most came from nearby Keeseville, and the first three worked in the original wooden tower before the current one was built in 1917.

That makes the fire tower 100 years old. It was part of a crop of standardized steel towers that New York State built in response to the catastrophic forest fires of the early 20th Century. Drought, high winds, lightning, heaps of logging slash, and sparks from lumber-hauling trains had combined to burn almost a million acres of New York forest over two decades. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

New Record Established For New York’s Breeding Bald Eagles

bald eaglesBald eagles are being seen in historic numbers across New York and the State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has reported the highest number of nesting pairs, an estimated 323 breeding pairs, since the agency undertook a restoration effort in 1976. Exact estimates will be determined over the course of the breeding season as biologists compile ground reports and surveys.

A record number of 53 new nesting territories were verified in 2016, increasing the total number of breeding territories in New York State to 442. Nesting territories are areas known to be occupied by bald eagles and are the locations included in DEC survey and monitoring efforts. Of these 442 territories, 309 (70 percent) were confirmed to host breeding pairs of eagles last year. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Grants Available For Adirondack Athletes, Organizations

uisf grant winners 2016Adirondack Foundation’s Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund (UISF) is accepting grant applications from individuals and organizations for 2017.

UISF supports nonprofits and community organizations that foster and promote life-long sports and healthy lifestyles for local kids. The fund also supports local athletes’ achievements, with a new emphasis on those who demonstrate a strong commitment to community service. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Two Weeks In The Adirondacks: 3 Dead; 15 Search and Rescues; 1 Remains Missing

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Survey Evaluates Health of Northern New York Bees

Cornell University Honey Bee Extension Associate Emma Mullen inspects a hive in Northern NY The results of a survey, believed to be the first of its kind, to identify the health of Northern New York bees, as well as the presence of key parasites and pathogens in regional bee colonies have been posted.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program provided a small grant for a survey of Northern New York bee colonies to contribute to regional knowledge and educate regional beekeepers on practices to better maintain the health of their bees and their businesses.

The data on the levels of 8 viruses in the NNY bee colonies contributes to a statewide database on the factors influencing pollinator health and identifying current management practices by beekeepers. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Safe Boating Course Offered In Ray Brook July 15-16th

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is offering a free two-day boater safety course at its Region 5 headquarters in Ray Brook on July 15 and 16.

Anyone born after May 1, 1996, must pass an approved boater safety course to legally operate a motor boat. In addition, New York State Law requires a boating safety course for the operation of personal watercraft (PWC).

The Safe Boating Course is a comprehensive course that provides the fundamentals of safe boating operation and is approved by the National Association of Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA). Certified Instructors and DEC Environmental Conservation Officers teach the course, which includes eight hours of classroom instruction over two days. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Meeting Set On Indian River, Cranberry Creek Wildlife Areas

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a public information session on Tuesday, August 1 from 6 to 8 pm, to provide information and answer questions on a recently finalized Habitat Management Plan (HMP) for Indian River and Cranberry Creek Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs). The two WMAs are located in the town of Alexandria, Jefferson County. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 10, 2017

Gerald Chapman: Clinton Prison Alum, America’s First ‘Super-Crook’

Near the end of his twenty-two-year career, Gerald Chapman’s several reputations came together in headlines touting him as a Spectacular Mail Bandit, Jail Breaker, and Criminal Extraordinaire. But above all, he was most often referred to as a “super-crook,” placing him beyond the level of most American criminals, one whose exploits were followed closely by the public. A worldwide manhunt finally resulted in his capture in 1925, but a decade earlier, he had done hard time at Clinton Prison.

Chapman, whose real name was believed to be George Chartres, or Charters, first ran into trouble in New York in 1908 and served a three-year stint in Sing Sing. After release, he was again arrested for grand larceny, and in January 1912 returned to Sing Sing, this time for ten years. As a brilliant criminal, and a handful to keep track of in any prison, he was sent north to the state’s most secure facility, Clinton Prison at Dannemora, where he quickly assumed a gang leadership position. As the source of many problems for guards and administration, he was finally relegated to an isolation cell, which at Clinton offered a very stark existence. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 10, 2017

Adirondack Birth to Three Alliance Pilots New Parent Kit

new parent guideThe Adirondack Birth to Three Alliance (BT3) has been selected by the NYS Parenting Education Partnership as one of five pilot groups for the New Parent Kit. The New Parent Kit includes two books — Starting Life Together (New Parent Guide) and What to Do When Your Child Gets Sick — as well as a Driver’s Manual for New Dads, and a bookmark.

Starting Life Together (New Parent Guide) is a user-friendly guide for parents of new babies. It steps parents through the stages of development steering them along the path to building a nurturing, healthy relationship with their child. What to Do When Your Child is Gets Sick is an easy to use manual for caregivers that is written in straight-forward, non-medical terms, offering practical tips for over 50 common childhood illnesses and injuries. » Continue Reading.


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