Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Peter Bauer: No Balance In NYCO Mining Expansions

NYCO-Map-1On the heels of the passage of Proposal 5 last November to sell 200 acres of Forest Preserve to NYCO Minerals, Inc., state agencies and NYCO are now going for broke in new permit applications for a massive expansion of NYCO’s two mines in the Town of Lewis. At the December 2013 meeting of the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) there was unanimous cheering among the APA Board and senior leadership over passage of Proposal 5. In those same weeks, NYCO began its applications to expand its two mines in Lewis.

NYCO is seeking major expansions of both mines. With its political fortunes at an all-time high, the time is right to permanently change the scale of its mining activities in the Champlain Valley. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A Judicial Retreat From Protecting The Adirondacks

Lady JusticeThe recent decision by the Appellate Division of State Supreme Court upholding the approval by the Adirondack Park Agency of the proposed Adirondack Club and Resort (ACR) project in Tupper Lake has generated intense controversy. Groups on both sides have weighed in with their views on the wisdom or folly of the APA’s approval of the massive project and the court’s affirmance of that approval.

Putting aside the merits of the controversy, what is striking about the court’s decision is the startling absence of any discussion of the uniqueness of the Adirondack Park, the history or purpose of the APA Act, or the special place the Park occupies in the hearts and minds of the people of New York. These omissions are all the more disturbing because of the court’s recognition that ACR is “the largest project ever proposed for New York’s 6,000,000-acre Adirondack Park.” Which leads one to wonder: have the courts fallen out of love with the Adirondack Park? » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Adirondack Nature Conservancy Annual Meeting Saturday

Nature Conservancy LogoThe Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy and the Adirondack Land Trust will be holding their annual meeting on Saturday, August 9, at View in Old Forge, New York. Everyone is welcome to attend.

The Regional Inlet Invasive Plant Program will be recognized for its local efforts to protect Adirondack lands and waters from Japanese knotweed, an invasive plant that chokes rivers and streams, harms native plant and wildlife habitat, impairs recreational access, and damages infrastructure. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, August 6, 2014

The Water’s Edge Marina on Lake George

photo 2The Water’s Edge Marina on Lake George has been family owned and operated for over 44 years. This hidden gem next to the bridge in Bolton Landing offers local favorites from their kitchen, fully equipped cottages with fireplaces and sun-decks, a pool, and a new fleet of rental boats.

This seasonal spot was opened in 1971 by the Waters family, and is now in its third generation of fast, friendly service. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Depot Theatre’s Shakespeare-in-the-Park Program

shakespeare in the park as you like itDepot Theatre’s Shakespeare-in-the-Park is celebrating its 12th season appropriately with William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

This rollicking and poignant comedy involves mistaken identity, unrequited love, a humorous rivalry between generations, capped off with a perfect comic ending consisting of many marriages that leaves you with a longing for the good ole days.

“Our approach to Shakespeare is playful, physical and accurate to his intent and meaning,” says Co-Director Scott Gibbs. “This shortened version of Twelfth Night will feature both traditional and modern music performed by our actors, who are a diverse group of local high school and college students as well as theatre professionals.” » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Old Stone Barracks Named To Endangered Resources List

464582_357114547674715_1290279954_oThe Preservation League of New York State has named the Old Stone Barracks in Plattsburgh to its list of the Empire State’s most threatened historic resources, Seven to Save.

Constructed in 1838, this is the oldest building at the former Plattsburgh Air Force Base. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, it illustrates the longstanding military presence in New York’s North Country between 1812 and 1995. The building boasts massive stone walls, heavy timber framing, and a two-story columned porch running the full length of the north façade. With views of Valcour Island, Cumberland Head, Grand Isle and the Green Mountains of Vermont, the building conveys the central role that military activities played in the history of the Champlain Valley. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, August 5, 2014

DEC Guidance For Discouraging Black Bear Nuisance

American black bear by Cephas @ Wikimedia CommonsThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is advising homeowners and tourists about ways to discourage bears from becoming a nuisance. Black bears will take advantage of almost any readily available food source. Once bears learn about human food sources, it is not easy to recondition them to the wild and this can lead to conflicts between bears and people. It is against the law to feed bear, deer and moose.

During midsummer and dry conditions, the black bear’s natural foods are much more difficult to find. DEC Wildlife and Law Enforcement staff respond with technical advice as quickly as possible but local residents and visitors are responsible for preventing bears from gaining access to food items such as bird food, garbage and unattended coolers. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, August 5, 2014

4th Sportsman Education Super Weekend Planned

_20140712_210633Cornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County, in partnership with DEC Sportsman Education volunteer instructors, will be organizing sportsmen education classes on Saturday, September 13th and Sunday, September 14th.

The following classes are being offered each day; Sportsman Education, Bow Hunter Education, or Trapper Education (you may choose ONE class per day, bow hunter students must have completed hunter education previous to registering for bow hunter education). Those who have completed online training MUST pre-register and must bring their printed certificate of completion with them to class.  They do not need to pick up the books. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Adirondack Museum To Celebrate Smokey Bear

AdirondackMuseum-SmokeyBearAug9An American icon has been working for decades to help you prevent forest fires, and he turns 70 this year, with a day-long celebration. “Smokey Bear’s 70th Birthday Party” will feature activities for all ages at the Adirondack Museum, from 10 am to 5 pm on Saturday, August 9th.  The event is included with general museum admission.

Bill Smith, the Utica Zoo, the Adirondack Interpretive Center, and the Adirondack Mountain Club will be on hand for a day of hands-on activities focusing on Smokey Bear, wildlife, and people living with nature. » Continue Reading.



Monday, August 4, 2014

Fight Against APA Over Tupper Resort Continues

Adirondack Club and Resort MapProtect the Adirondacks and the Sierra Club are asking the Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, to review a recent decision in favor of the developers of the Adirondack Club and Resort, a massive development proposed for Tupper Lake.

In July, the Appellate Division of State Supreme Court upheld the Adirondack Park Agency’s decision to grant a permit to the developers.

In a statement today, Protect and the Sierra Club said the midlevel appeals court, which is based in Albany, made several errors in its analysis of the case. Because the Appellate Division’s decision was unanimous, the groups must seek permission to take the case to the Court of Appeals.

Following is the groups’ full statement:

» Continue Reading.



Monday, August 4, 2014

Ella Frances Lynch: Minerva’s Maven of Early Education

1aEFLynchBeginning here is the story of an unknown but truly remarkable woman, an educator from Adirondack history. But first, some related information is helpful for perspective. For starters, here’s a sampling of complaints about our educational system: low graduation rates; undeserved diplomas; graduates lacking in real-world skills; students woefully unprepared for college; students without self-discipline, and more. Those are all issues today, but the very same items were also cited in 1970.

Since that time, our spending on education has risen by about 85 percent, but we’ve improved very little, still stymied by the same problems. In the meantime, we’ve fallen far behind many other countries, while still spouting that we’re the greatest country in the world. If we don’t find the answers soon, the hollow ring of that claim might well become deafening.

Since 1970, we’ve improved just about everything: civil rights, technology, weapons, communications, you name it—but in educating our youth, we’re failing over and over in so many ways. Sure, there are good kids, smart kids, geniuses, and prosperous citizens coming out of our schools, but consider a few shocking numbers that provide some balance. » Continue Reading.



Monday, August 4, 2014

A Look At Lake Placid’s Sports Culture Tuesday Evening

Ski Jumper at the Lake Placid Club c 1920 (Lake Placid Library)The Adirondack History Center continues its weekly summer lecture series at 7 p.m. on Tuesday evening, August 5th, at the museum in Elizabethtown.

“Building Lake Placid’s Sports Culture” will be presented by Lake Placid and Olympic sports researcher Jim Rogers, a resident of Lake Placid.

“Lake Placid has a long and noble tradition within the world of winter sports,” said Director Diane O’Connor. “The area has a remarkable reputation as an incubator for winter Olympians and outdoor sports enthusiasts. This culture continues to influence both the history as well as the economy of the Adirondacks.” » Continue Reading.



Monday, August 4, 2014

National Exhibition of American Watercolors Opening

Chaos-at-Pond's-Edge_HaraldAksdalThe opening reception for the 33rd annual Adirondacks Exhibition of American Watercolors will be on Friday, August 8 from 5 to 7 pm.  The event is free and open to the public. There will be a special performance by guitarist Andrew Barrett from Detroit, Michigan. Hors d’oevres will be prepared by Executive Sous Chef Justin Connerty of Naples, FL (formally Inlet N.Y.).

The watercolor exhibition will run from August 8 to October 5, 2014. This year’s juried exhibit features over 70 artists from all stretches of the continental United States and Canada. The jurors for 2014 are William Vrscak, AWS, and Judi Betts AWS, NWS. » Continue Reading.



Monday, August 4, 2014

Newcomb Central School Partners With Paul Smith’s College

signing_mou_crop_6174_12312_0Paul Smith’s College is partnering with Newcomb Central School this fall on a new advanced studies program.

Under the agreement, Newcomb students who pay tuition for the program can earn up to 45 college credits for certain high-school classes. During the upcoming school year, Newcomb will offer up to 10 advanced studies courses, including finite math, English composition 1, financial accounting, business law and physics.

“This is a huge opportunity for our students,” Skip Hults, superintendent of Newcomb Central School, said in a statement to the press announcing the partnership. “Programs such as this give students confidence and increase their chances of going on to grad school later. It’s also a much less expensive path to a baccalaureate degree.” » Continue Reading.



Sunday, August 3, 2014

Adirondack Memories and Campfire Stories

Layout 1If you’ve spent any time rambling New York’s north country roads, you may have wondered how Eagle Lake got its name, or how little towns like Schroon Lake and Chateaugay and Redford came to be before the north became a tourist haven. Where is that Cold River hermit that your grandfather told you about? What about the weird beliefs of early Adirondack days?   Maybe you’re still holding out for the possibility of a sea serpent in Lake Champlain, or hoping you’ll chance upon a legendary lost silver mine while you’re out enjoying a hike in the balsam wood.

This is the sort of interesting and sometimes unusual information that readers of Adirondack Memories and Campfire Stories (2014) will find fascinating. William J. “Jay” O’Hern has compiled first-hand stories from a series of little quarterly magazines that native Adirondack archivist, historian, and folklorist George Glyndon Cole published from 1946-1974. Few complete collections now exist, in less than a handful of North Country libraries, but back then readers eagerly anticipated each new issue. Some readers will remember reading North Country Life, later called York State Tradition, from cover to cover. It was exciting indeed to read about one’s own rural region, especially when the articles came straight from the pens and hearts of one’s neighbors. » Continue Reading.


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Saturday, August 2, 2014

The Milky Way From Adirondak Loj Road

Loj Rd Milky Way

Photographing the Milky Way is both fun and challenging. July and August are the best times of year to view the Milky Way. During these months the bright center of the galaxy is visible in the night sky. While you will see the Milky Way arcing across the sky on a clear dark night, the best direction to look this time of year is to the south.

If you want to photograph the Milky Way make sure your camera is on a tripod and start with these settings: f2.8, 30sec, ISO 6400. Further adjustments may need to be made on your computer, but you should get a good image of the Milky Way, especially in a dark location. Astrophotography images require practice and a bit of knowledge about the night sky and current weather conditions. Regardless of how my photographs turn out it is always a pleasure to spend a few hours staring into the heavens.



Saturday, August 2, 2014

Commentary: Toward a More Diverse Adirondacks

PrintSeveral months ago I wrote a series of columns on socioeconomic and racial diversity and the Adirondacks. The reception to these columns was even stronger than I expected. Much of it was thoughtful. Some of it was controversial. Some of it was ugly. But in total the columns and the reaction validated my point that for most people diversity in the Adirondacks is an under-the-radar issue even though it is arguably the most important issue facing the future of the park.

Since then the conversation has grown and led to action. Many stakeholders in the park recognize that human diversity – my new descriptor, for indeed the issue is bigger than just racial or socioeconomic problems – is just as important to the Adirondacks as plant and animal diversity is to a healthy Forest Preserve. » Continue Reading.



Friday, August 1, 2014

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights



Friday, August 1, 2014

Ed Kanze: Who Rules The World?

ed-kanze-archaeaWho’s in charge, my daughter wanted to know? She’d been given a tee-shirt that proclaims “Girls Rule The World.” Now she wanted to know: do they? Listen to my answer in this week’s edition of All Things Natural with Ed Kanze.

The podcast is produced by Mountain Lake PBS’s Josh Clement. Listen to past episodes by visiting Mountain Lake PBS’s Borderless North webpage at mountainlake.org/bn.



Friday, August 1, 2014

Will Fixing The Tracks Cost $15M or $44M?

Adirondack Scenic Railroad -Nancie BattagliaIf you’ve been following the debate over the Old Forge-to-Lake Placid rail corridor (and who hasn’t?), you probably have seen the widely disparate estimates on how much it would cost to restore rail service over the entire line.

The Adirondack Scenic Railroad says reconstructing the unused portion of the tracks—some sixty-eight miles—would cost about $15 million. Adirondack Recreational Trail Advocates (ARTA), which is pushing the state to replace the tracks with a multi-use trail, puts that figure at around $44 million.

Which figure is correct?

They both are.

» Continue Reading.



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