Thursday, March 3, 2016

Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondacks (Mar 3)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is issued each Thursday afternoon and can be heard at North Country Public Radio on Friday mornings.

Sunrise Saturday in Lake Placid will be at 6:25 am; sunset at 5:50 pm, providing 11 hours and 25 minutes of sunlight. The Moon will rise Saturday night at 10:36 pm and set at 9:25 am Sunday. Saturday’s moon will be Waning Crescent with 15% of its visible portion illuminated. There will be a New Moon on Wednesday and consequently dark skies through the coming week to view the Milky Way, which is high in the sky. On March 9th, the New Moon will totally eclipse the sun (the totality will be visible across Indonesia and the Pacific Ocean).

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 3, 2016

Timbuctoo Exhibit Finds Permanent Home

timbuctooA landmark civil rights exhibit that has been seen by thousands of viewers across New York state is about to get a permanent home in Lake Placid.

The Dreaming of Timbuctoo exhibition will be installed this spring at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site, where visitors will have a chance to get an up-close look at a little-known period of Adirondack and African-American history when black and white abolitionists worked together to secure equal voting rights for black New Yorkers. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 2, 2016

High Peaks Happy Hour: Fulton Chain Craft Brewing

FCCB_J&RThere is nothing better than a road trip on the Happy Hour Trail to reaffirm our belief that you always meet the nicest people in the Adirondacks. A full day of travel to interview and tour two breweries in the Old Forge and Tug Hill regions covered a lot of ground. Venturing through Eagle Bay, Old Forge, and finally to Lowville, we were met with happy, friendly faces at every turn. Without exception, whether they held the door for us at a convenience store or took time from their busy schedules to share their knowledge of brewing, every person we encountered was upbeat and friendly. Smiles on a beautiful day in the Adirondacks are definitely contagious. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Lake Champlain Sturgeon Program Planned For Thursday

lake sturgeonThe Lake Champlain Basin Program is hosting “Lake Sturgeon Return!” on Thursday, March 3, 2016 at the LCBP office in Grand Isle.

The LCBP will host guest speaker Chet MacKenzie, Vermont Fish and Wildlife Fisheries Program Manager. MacKenzie will share the life cycle of the sturgeon, photos and images of lake sturgeon, and preliminary results of Vermont’s sturgeon tagging program.

The lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), is one of about 25 species of sturgeon, an ancient bottom feeder with a partly cartilaginous skeleton. Lake sturgeons can grow to more than seven feet long and weigh over 240 pounds. Lake sturgeon are found in areas that were linked by the large lakes that formed as the glaciers retreated from North America at the end of the last ice age, including the Mississippi River drainage, the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River and Detroit Rivers, The Hudson River and Lake Champlain. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Rangers Assist Injured Hiker On Porter Mountain

DEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of a recent mission carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks.
» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Women of WWI Laid the Groundwork for Rosie the Riveter

WomenWWI AIn observing National Women’s History Month 2016 (March), the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) has adopted the theme, “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government.” Among the women specifically cited is Judy Hart (1941–present), whose 27-year career with the National Park Service included a stint as the first superintendent of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Park in Richmond, California, a facility she helped create.

As the NWHP notes, “over 9,000 Rosies have contributed their stories to the park, and more than 2,000 have donated their personal items and mementos.” It’s fortunate that the Rosies are so well represented, but unfortunate that their World War I counterparts, who laid the groundwork for the Rosie movement, are largely overlooked. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Reason 2 Smile World Music Festival Saturday

Reason2SmileDrummingThe Lake Placid not-for-profit organization Reason 2 Smile is hosting an its annual all-day cultural music festival with workshops, a children’s camp, and an evening performance on March 5 at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts.

According to Reason 2 Smile Executive Director Donna Rosenblum, the one-day event will be presented in the same format as previous years. A morning Kids Camp, ages 6-12, will introduce Kenyan games, crafts, African drumming and dance; younger children (ages 5 and under) are welcome to attend with an adult. The morning and afternoon adult workshops (ages 13 years and older) focus on art, music and dance with various activities from Native American Storytelling and Didgeridoo making, to Irish Step Dancing. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

An Exhibition Celebrating Trees Seeks Artists

north by bob ericksonView, a multi-arts center located in Old Forge, has announced the call for entry for Branches, Brambles, and Roots: An Exhibition Celebrating Trees.

Trees provide shelter, building materials, shade, food, warmth, a place to sit or nest, a place to climb, play, and more. They have been celebrated, venerated, feared, worshipped, and cut down.

View is seeking artists for an all media, juried exhibition, that explores all aspects of trees in art, from raw material to inspiration and everything in between.

The exhibition is open to all media, for artists 18 and over, with a chance at over $3,000 in prizes. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 29, 2016

Bobcat Ranney: The Hermit Of Tombstone Swamp

Bobcat Picture from Adirondack MuseumIn this digital age, it’s hard for anyone to escape entirely from the eyes of the world, and that goes for Adirondack hermits, too. Even dead ones.

A case in point is Archie “Bobcat” Ranney, who lived in a cabin near Bakers Mills, sometimes surviving on porcupine meat.

I learned about Ranney from Dick MacKinnon, a native of Schenectady, who in turned learned about him from Jim Osterhout, a childhood friend who once met the hermit. Dick sent me a bunch of emails with articles about Ranney as well as a few photos. I then stumbled across more articles about him on my own. Everything was online.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, February 29, 2016

‘Lies My Teacher Told Me’ Author Speaking in Placid Friday

lies my teacher told meThe author of a best-selling book decrying the state of history education in the United States will speak at a teacher workshop in Lake Placid on Friday, March 4.

John Brown Lives! will host James Loewen, author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, at a day-long workshop, “Teaching the Past & Why It Matters Today,” meant to help teachers, librarians and others working with students constructively engage issues of social justice in the classroom and community using history and dialogue as primary tools.

First published in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me challenged traditional historical narratives taught to students. After comparing a dozen history textbooks then in widespread use, Loewen concluded that the books were filled with an “embarrassing blend of bland optimism, blind nationalism, and plain misinformation.” » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 29, 2016

Local Irish History Focus of Exhibit, Programs

Ti Historical SocietyThe Ticonderoga Historical Society has released a line-up of exhibits and programs for 2016. Principal exhibits will include a look at pivotal world events through Adirondack eyes.

Opening March 18, A Terrible Beauty addresses how Irish-Americans in Ticonderoga, the Adirondack region and New York State provided support for Irish independence and the subsequent creation of the Irish Free State. The opening will feature a program by Diane O’Connor.

In addition to the exhibit of nearly 100 loaned items relating to Irish freedom, the Historical Society will four Irish-themed movie and discussion evenings on April 15, May 20, June 3 and July 8. Movies will include “The Quiet Man,” “Michael Collins,” “The Wind that Shakes the Barley,” and “The Secret of Roan Inish.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 28, 2016

Local Bats and White Nose Syndrome

220px-Little_Brown_Bat_with_White_Nose_Syndrome_(Greeley_Mine,_cropped)Context is critical, right? Years ago I took a second job loading trucks at night, and a few guys on the dock had what you might call “white-nose syndrome.” All I had was coffee, so they could work faster than I, though they spent a lot more time in the rest room. I hope they eventually recovered.

Addiction is a serious and potentially life-threatening matter, but from a bat’s perspective, white-nose syndrome is something even more devastating. This disease, which is nearly always fatal, has killed 80% of the bats in the Northeastern U.S. in less than a decade. Initially found in central New York in 2007, white-nose syndrome now affects bats in 25 states and 5 Canadian provinces. Since it was first identified, it has felled more than 7 million bats, leaving once-packed hibernation sites, or hibernacula, empty, and pushing some species to the edge of extinction. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 27, 2016

Restaurant Review: A Return to Liquids and Solids

Liquids and Solids ExteriorAs a foodie, occasional restaurant reviewer, and newly minted full-time resident of the Adirondack Park, I plan to really delve into the region’s many culinary heights. Nearly two years ago I visited Liquids and Solids in Lake Placid, which was relatively new on the scene. As I wrote at the time, I was impressed with their creativity and ambition. So what better place to start my latest Adirondack food tour than a return visit to see how they have come along? » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 27, 2016

In Cold, Wet Woods, Needle Ice Sprouts

ice needle the outsiderThe bare ground of the trail wound through dead leaves and patchy snow. At a short overhang in the trail, I noticed spiky threads of ice growing up from the soil in crunchy clusters. A careless boot revealed how fragile these formations are; the fine ice threads crumbled readily. This was needle ice, a common sight in the woods this winter.

Curious about the phenomenon, I got in touch with Dr. James R. Carter, a professor emeritus from Illinois State University. Dr. Carter has spent the last ten year observing these ice formations. His photographs and descriptions of different examples of needle ice are available here.

Carter explained that while needle ice somewhat resembles frost, it is a completely different phenomenon. Frost forms when water vapor is deposited onto a growing ice crystal; the water molecules move directly from the gas phase to the solid phase without ever becoming a liquid. Needle ice, on the other hand, forms from liquid water when a process called ice segregation occurs in the soil. » Continue Reading.


Friday, February 26, 2016

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


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