Friday, July 22, 2016

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Plattsburgh’s Erastus Hudson and the Lindbergh Baby Case

1A EMHudson“Trial of the Century” is a term frequently bandied about in the media to define extremely high-profile court cases. In the 1900s, twenty or so sported the moniker—the Scopes Monkey Trial, Nuremburg, Charles Manson, and O. J. Simpson among them—but always in the running, and at the top of many lists, is the Lindbergh Kidnapping in 1935. (The crime was committed in 1932; the court case began three years later.) At the center of one of the main issues during that trial was a North Country man, whose testimony spawned doubt among observers that justice was achieved. Many books have been written about the case during the ensuing 81 years, addressing the controversy as to whether the final verdict was justice or a travesty thereof.

That North Country man was Erastus Mead Hudson, born into a prominent Plattsburgh family in March 1888. (Hudson Hall at Plattsburgh State University is named after Erastus’s father, George Henry Hudson.) He attended Plattsburgh High School, and after graduating from Harvard in 1913 with a bachelor of science degree, Erastus attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, graduating in 1917 with specialties in bacteriology and body chemistry. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondacks (July 21)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is issued each Thursday afternoon and can be heard at North Country Public Radio on Friday mornings.

Sunrise Saturday in Lake Placid will be at 5:34 am; sunset at 8:30 pm, providing 14 hours and 54 minutes of sunlight. The Moon will rise at 10:41 pm Saturday and set at 3:32 am Sunday. The Moon will be Waning Gibbous, 84% illuminated. There was a Full Moon on Tuesday and nights this weekend will be well lit by the moon.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Visiting The Lake George Association Floating Classroom

GroupofkidswithnewlifejacketsThe Lake George Association (LGA) continues its on-water educational programing through the summer with public tours each Wednesday in July and August.

In 2009, the 40-ft catamaran-style Rosalia Anna Ashby, named for LGA member Bruce Ashby’s mother, was built specifically to further the on-water aspect of the  Lake George Association’s educational programming. The Floating classroom’s two-hour tour covers a variety of topics from earthquakes and glaciers to storm water and invasive species. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Forest Pests Could Change Adirondack Forests

Hemlock woolly adelgidAdirondack forests could see major changes in the coming decades as a result of forest pests, according to experts who attended a forest pest summit in North Creek recently.

Both the hemlock woolly adelgid and the emerald ash borer have been found south of the Adirondack Park, and the balsam woolly adelgid appears to be causing more damage to balsam firs inside the Blue Line in recent years. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Grants Support Early Ed, Healthy Seniors, Nonprofit Capacity

adirondack community outreachAdirondack Foundation’s Generous Acts Fund has just awarded $60,000 in grants to community organizations across the region.

The Generous Acts Fund represents a commitment by Adirondack Foundation to the present and future of the region, through grantmaking, capacity building, and initiatives like the Birth to Three Alliance, the Adirondack Diversity Advisory Council, the Adirondack Nonprofit Network, and more. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Tupper Lake: A Hub of Potential

tupper lake storeThe roads were torn up and dusty, with holes almost a story deep in places. It was difficult to navigate around the construction, and visiting a shop on the main Park Street thoroughfare was all but impossible.

Yet, the positive energy in Tupper Lake was palpable.

Have you been to Tupper Lake lately? I’ve been there several times recently for a variety of reasons, and in this outsider’s opinion, great things are going on. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Herping: The Sounds Of Amphibians

toad cropIts that time of the year when kids dart to ponds with nets in hand, searching for amphibians. Frogs, toads, newts and salamanders are among us! In early spring some species use vernal pools as breeding and incubating grounds.

A vernal pool is a temporary body of water that resembles a large puddle. There are obligate indicator (dependent) species and facultative (use only for part of the life cycle) species. The obligate indicator species are wood frogs, eastern spade-foot toads (Scaphiopus holbrooki), and the Jefferson/ blue spotted complex salamander (Ambystoma jeffersonium x laterale). The facultative species are most of the other frogs/toads, a few reptiles, as well as fingernail and amphibious clams and leeches, Isopods, caddisfly, dragonfly, dobsonfly larvae, water strider, whirligig beetle, and backswimmers, which get eaten by the adult amphibians. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

George Bumann, Artist in Residence at Newcomb Visitor Center

George BumannNationally recognized artist and naturalist George Bumann is serving as this summer’s Artist in Residence at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb. George grew up outside of Syracuse and is a graduate of SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry, which operates the Interpretive Center. Because he spent time in Newcomb as an undergraduate, this residency is a kind of homecoming.

Based in Montana, George has the unique privilege to live in Yellowstone National Park. He is surrounded by his subject – immersed in a landscape populated with wild animals. Working in clay and bronze he captures the nature of wild animals with information and insight gathered from direct experience. It’s astonishing that George does not work from photography and sometimes sculpts out-of-doors from the back of his car. In George’s view photographs are flat and cannot give information from every angle the way working from life can. When asked about how animals are constantly in motion he said when the animal changes position, he simply rotates his sculpture. I don’t know any other artist who drives around with a roadkill kit but George gets very excited about describing his kit and the wonderful data he gathers with it. How else could one touch a grizzle bear except after its death? While in the field he makes full use of these rare opportunities to measure every length of bone to bring accuracy to his sculptures. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

DEC Sweetened Pot With Champlain, Lake George Lands To Close Raquette Lake Land Deal

Marion_RiverAs part of an effort to resolve a century-old dispute over the ownership of land near Raquette Lake, the state Department of Environmental Conservation has agreed to acquire not only the Marion River carry, but also more than 1,400 acres of land in other parts of the Adirondack Park.

In a letter to Assemblyman Steven Englebright, DEC chief Basil Seggos said the state is committed to buying from the Open State Institute 836 acres on Huckleberry Mountain in Warren County and 616 acres along Lake Champlain, including 4,000 feet of shoreline.

In addition, Seggos said DEC will be buying “some or all” of the following properties: » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

42nd Old Forge Antiques, Vintage Show Saturday

view antique and vintage saleThe annual Old Forge Antique and Vintage Show and Sale is returning this year to the George T. Hildebrant Recreation Center on North Street from Saturday, July 23 to Sunday, July 24.

The show will be open from 10 am to 5 pm on Saturday and 10 am to 4 pm on Sunday. The show typically attracts more than 1,200 visitors. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Loon Art Show Benefiting Conservation Ends Saturday

SSG Ruiz Carving welcome to the worldThe Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation’s benefit art show at the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts in Blue Mountain Lake ends July 23, 2016.

“Conservation Through the Lives of Adirondack Loons” features work by award-winning artists showcasing the natural beauty of Common Loons and their wild habitats. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Recent Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Operations

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 18, 2016

Court Halts DEC Tree Cutting, Grading On Forest Preserve

minerva to newcomb snowmobile trailA justice of the Appellate Division, Third Department, of state Supreme Court issued an order on Friday that halted tree cutting by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) on a new 9-12 foot wide snowmobile trail between Newcomb and Minerva in the central Adirondacks.

According to a survey commissioned by Protect the Adirondacks, the DEC cut over 4,000 trees on 2.9 miles of this trail in the fall of 2015, had recently cut thousands of trees on a new 3-mile section in June and July 2016, and was about to cut thousands more trees, including many located in old growth forest habitat. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 18, 2016

Adirondack Wildlife: Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds

the outsider hummingbirdZzz-zzzt. Sitting on my deck on a summer afternoon, I’m often distracted by a hummingbird whizzing by. The tiny bundle of energy hovers in front of a row of jewelweed, probing each pendulous orange flower with its long beak, then backs up and darts to the next. My dozing cat raises his head and observes the hummingbird as it zips by, heading for the cardinal flower. “Don’t you even think it,” I admonish him.

This bee-like creature is a ruby-throated hummingbird, the only species of hummingbird found in our region. Iridescent green with a white breast, it is named for the male’s scarlet throat (the female has a white throat – as do this year’s little ones of both genders). Ruby-throats weigh only 0.1 to 0.2 ounces, less than a nickel. Kent McFarland of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies, who has banded these birds, commented, “when you have one in your hand, it is shocking how small they are.” » Continue Reading.


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