Friday, June 20, 2014

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


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Friday, June 20, 2014

Brendan Wiltse: A View Of Avalanche Lake

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As a general rule it is best to avoid taking landscape shots in the middle of the day. The harsh light and lack of contrast across the landscape doesn’t usually make for interesting shots. That said, you need to know when to break the rules as well. This shot of Avalanche Lake was taken mid-day, but the ominous clouds in the distance added a lot of mood to the scene.



Friday, June 20, 2014

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Trail To Honor Civil Rights Worker Andrew Goodman

Goodman Mountain TrailThe Adirondack Park Agency has approved the adoption and rerouting of a trail up Goodman Mountain (2,176 feet) in the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest (part of the Bog River Complex) in honor of Andrew Goodman, a civil rights worker murdered on June 21, 1964.

Local historian William Frenette of Tupper Lake led a successful effort to have the peak named Goodman Mountain in 2002. The Goodman family built and lived in a stone house near the outlet of the Bog River at the south end of Tupper Lake that still stands today.

Goodman was helping register African Americans to vote near Philadelphia, Mississippi, as part of the Freedom Summer project of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) when he was abducted by members of the Ku Klux Klan along with Mickey Schwerner and James Chaney. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, June 19, 2014

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (June 19)

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This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. A narrative version of this report can be found at Mountain Lake PBS.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.



Thursday, June 19, 2014

Wooden Canoe Heritage Association Meeting

2014-Assembly-artwork-for-web-262x300The Wooden Canoe Heritage Association will celebrate their 35th Anniversary at their Annual Assembly, July 15-20, 2014, at Paul Smith’s College. The theme of is year’s meeting will be “Modern Classics” and will feature contemporary builders.

The Wooden Canoe Heritage Association is a non-profit organization devoted to preserving, studying, building, restoring, and using wooden and bark canoes.

Photos from the 2013 Assembly can be found here and here. A draft program and schedule can also be found online.

 

 



Thursday, June 19, 2014

Comments Sought On Snowmobile Trails, New State Lands

Essex Chain CampsitesIncreased opportunities for outdoor recreation in the Adirondacks would be available under two proposed plans released today for public review and comment, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced. Comments will be accepted on the Essex Chain Lakes Management Complex Draft Unit Management Plan (Draft UMP) and a Draft Community Connector Multiple-Use Trail Plan (Draft Trail Plan) through July 18.

The Essex Chain Lakes Management Complex includes the 6,956-acre Essex Chain Primitive Area, the 2,788-acre Pine Lake Primitive Area and a portion of the 42,537-acre Blue Mountain Wild Forest. These lands are located in the Town of Indian Lake in Hamilton County, and towns of Newcomb and Minerva in Essex County. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Barbara McMartin’s Guidebook Series Marks 40 Years

Discover SeriesIn 2014, the Discover the Adirondacks series of guidebooks has reached an important milestone: its fortieth birthday. The series began in 1974 under a different name, with a single book that covered just one part of the Adirondacks.  It was intended by its author to illustrate that there was more to the Adirondack Park than just the High Peaks, where the majority of the non-motorized trail building had occurred. When philosophical differences led to a split with her original publisher, she found a new one and proceeded to accomplish the unprecedented: a detailed, eleven-volume guidebook series that covered every region in the six-million-acre park. To mark the occasion, I have taken the liberty of writing this short history of how the Discover series came to be—with hints of where it might be going.

In 1974, the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) published a compact volume called Walks and Waterways: An Introduction to Adventure by Barbara McMartin Patterson. It was a guidebook that suggested ninety-eight walks and paddle trips in the space of about 170 pages, covering an area that ranged from Stratford to Speculator in the southern Adirondacks. The book featured five small pullout trail maps that had been drawn by a cartography student at Briarcliff College, and it was adorned by dozens of pencil sketches drawn by the author. It was intended to be “an encyclopedic list of all the paths and water routes,” as well as “a guide for the amateur explorer, in order that he can better enjoy the forest paths, canoe trips, and automobile routes.” It was, in fact, the first guidebook that McMartin would publish, and the nucleus of what would grow to become the future series.

» Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 18, 2014

The View From Cascade Mountain

Cascade2 -finalOn Monday I climbed Cascade Mountain, one of the most popular High Peaks.  I met over 50 people headed up as I was descending.



Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Bolton Landing: The Lakeside Lodge & Grille

photo 5(1)The Lakeside Lodge & Grille offers a slice of Adirondack atmosphere in the quiet village of Bolton Landing. Established as The Lakeside Lodge in 1945 by the Keating family, the restaurant (which then included guest rooms above) was purchased by the Scott family in 1972 and renamed The House of Scotts.

The Current owners,  Art and Nicole Baker, purchased the business in 2006 and returned to the name as The Lakeside Lodge & Grille. The Bakers are hands-on owners and active citizens in their community.

Although their menu offers a variety of selections – fresh fish, hand cut steaks, gluten-free options – two staples are the Spicy Corn Chowder and The Crown Island.  The bowl of the chowder is a meal unto itself, and the The Crown Island is one of my personal favorites. It features generous portions of turkey and pastrami with swiss cheese, cole slaw and thousand island dressing on panni pressed marble rye bread. It’s a knock out. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Stand-Up Paddling Festival in Saranac Lake This Weekend

Modern stand-up paddling (SUP) has become one of the fastest growing water sports. This weekend Adirondack Lakes and Trails Outfitters is giving everyone an opportunity to see what all the fuss is about June 20-21 at the Lake Colby beach in Saranac Lake.

The history of SUP is long and convoluted with references found thousands of years ago of ancient cultures using boards and sticks to propel themselves through the water to fish or travel. The modern stand-up version is most often attributed to surfing because of the similar board shape. Around the Adirondacks, SUP is becoming a popular alternative to canoeing and kayaking. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, June 18, 2014

DEC Seeks Comments On Draft North Country Trail Plan

North Country Scenic Trail RouteAs part of a federal effort to expand the national trail system across the northern U.S., the  New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has released a revised draft Adirondack Park Trail Plan for the North Country National Scenic Trail (NST). The plan includes recommendations for the route of the National Scenic Trail through the Adirondack Park.

In March 1980, federal legislation authorized the establishment of the North Country National Scenic Trail (NST) as a component of the National Trails System. To date, Congress has authorized the establishment of eight National Scenic Trails – long distance, non-motorized trails that follow major geographic features or pass through scenic areas. National Scenic Trails are patterned after the renowned Appalachian National Scenic Trail, commonly known as the Appalachian Trail. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 17, 2014

The Mysterious End of Robert Perkins, Opera Star

03A 1917AdPerkinsThe emergency passport request of Robert and Margaret Perkins was granted, and a long, difficult journey began on the heels of what had been a very trying time. Besides the recent separation, their last year in Darmstadt had been spent in poverty-like conditions. Germany’s inflation rate had skyrocketed, driving up the price of everyday items. Robert and Margaret were forced to live on meager supplies and with little heat during the cold winter. They witnessed a food riot. All about them, men, even partially disabled, were conscripted into the military. Women were forced to fill the manual labor jobs normally held by men. And everywhere, soldiers marched off to war, spouting hatred for England and America, and confident of victory.

They had also seen the plight of French war prisoners held in a camp near Darmstadt. Likewise, while traveling through France, they encountered prison camps where Germans were held. At Paris, they met the first 150 American soldiers to land in France after the war declaration. As shiploads of fighting men arrived, the frightened couple found passage home on the Rochambeau. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Slide Climbing: Dix Mountain Ring Slide (Central)

Dix Mountain Ring SlideThe northern cirque of Dix Mountain hosts one of the region’s best slide climbing destinations with numerous tracks of quality rock. Even if you’re not an adventurer, it’s difficult not to appreciate the artistry and power of nature while driving from Keene to Keene Valley on Route 73.

Collectively known as the Finger slides, the array is arranged from southwest to northeast spanning ½ mile beginning with the Thumb slide and ending with the Pinky (Per Drew Haas’ Slide Guide). Multiple slides sometimes make up one finger.

Though several slides existed prior to the cloudburst, they were recreated in their current incarnation during the second week of August in 1993; Adirondacks Alive by Olaf Sööt and Don Mellor shows an excellent photo of the fresh slides. Not surprisingly, climbers began exploring soon thereafter. A few years later the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reported that a scrambler was injured by a falling rock; a reminder of the inherent danger of slide climbing. While the approach is fairly long, it’s via a scenic trail that passes Round Pond and traverses along the North Fork Boquet River. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Lake Placid Blues and Heritage Festival This Weekend

LPBluesFestJune 20-22, 2014 will mark the beginning of a new music experience as Lake Placid plays host to the inaugural Lake Placid Blues and Heritage Festival presented by Miller Lite.

During this first-time event, the village will sway and rock to the sounds of 20+ notable blues bands from throughout the northeastern U.S. Spread out at nearly 10 different venues.

The festival will celebrate exceptional music and the rich heritage of the Lake Placid area and include local and regional bands. Some of the local entertainment groups include Spring Street, Lucid, The Harbingers, the Back Porch Society, Sven Curth and friends, Big Slyde and Fade to Blues. Regional and national acts include The Roxy Perry Blues Band, George Boone, Rhett Tyler and Early Warning, George Kilby Jr. with special guest Barbecue Bob, Murali Coryell, Jerry Dugger, and many more. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 16, 2014

NYCO Amendment Commentary:
We Need A Regional Memory

NYCO-Minerals-Wollastonite-Mine-Nancie-B-PhotoThis week has seen the most recent amendment to Article XIV of the NY State Constitution, known colloquially as the NYCO Amendment, return to front page news.

Just last Friday the Adirondack Park Agency approved an amendment to the Jay Mountain Wilderness Unit Management Plan (UMP) to allow NYCO Minerals to conduct exploratory drilling on the 200 acre parcel known as Lot 8. This drilling will allow NYCO to determine whether they want to swap Lot 8 for other land to be given to the State, as authorized by the amendment. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 16, 2014

Giant Swallowtail Butterflies Moving North

Giant_SwallowtailIt’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a …? In September of 2012, I spied something fluttering wildly on the lavender phlox in front of my house. At first I thought it was a hummingbird, but as I moved closer I discovered it was a huge butterfly – the largest I’d ever seen, with a wingspan of about six inches. I rushed into the house to get my camera.

The butterfly was a challenge to photograph, its wings a blur as it hovered and darted from flower to flower, sipping nectar with its long tongue. The upper side of its wings were black, with a band of yellow spots from wingtip to wingtip. Another yellow band led diagonally from each wingtip to each wing “tail.” The tails were long, with yellow spots edged in black. On the underside, the coloration was similar to a tiger swallowtail – pale yellow with thin black stripes. I consulted my butterfly guides and determined the fabulous creature was a giant swallowtail, a cousin to our common Canadian tiger swallowtail. » Continue Reading.



Monday, June 16, 2014

High Peaks In The Clouds

Algonquin summit

Mount Colden and Mount Marcy, seen from Algonquin’s summit as morning clouds start to clear Sunday morning. The MacIntyre Range has some of the best views in the Adirondacks.



Monday, June 16, 2014

Tahawus Center Offering Summer Science Lab

one catapultThe annual Summer Science Lab at the Tahawus Center in Au Sable Forks is expanding to 5 days, July 14 through 18, 2014. The five-morning workshop accommodates two different age groups in separate sessions: middle school (12-14 years old) and elementary school (9-11 years old). The focus will be on magnetism and electricity for both age groups, with activities in other subject areas, including physics and using microscopes.

Science is always more than a set of explanations,” says instructor Gary Dreiblatt. “Our electricity activities will have students make simple circuits, complex series and parallel circuits, and experiment with the concept of electrical resistance to ultimately build a working fuse. Students will have a far better understanding of electricity and safety through these activities. They will be able to take their electrical kits home to teach a family member and continue their own investigations using d cell batteries.” » Continue Reading.



Sunday, June 15, 2014

In 1845 An Abolition Activist Toured the Adirondacks

Gerrit Smith in the 1840sLate spring of 1845 found Gerrit Smith, a leader of the Liberty Party, touring the North Country in search of disaffected “Whigs and Democrats, whose intelligence and Christian integrity will not permit them to remain longer in their pro-slavery connections.”

Smith, from Peterboro, in Madison County, traveled from Saratoga Springs, through Glens Falls and then into Essex and Clinton counties on his quest to build a credible third party, a devoted anti-slavery party. His report, printed in the Albany Patriot in late June, details the villages his visited, the people he met, and the difficulties he faced. » Continue Reading.



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