Wednesday, May 7, 2014

‘At the Lake’ Exhibit Highlights Lake George History

Waltonian CampThe Chapman Historical Museum’s new exhibit, At the Lake, which runs through August 31, presents different perspectives on what it has meant to be at Lake George over the past 150 years.  Included in the exhibit are the stories of groups that camped on the lake’s many islands, families that built grand homes on the lake, and others who constructed more modest camps.

To diversify the story the exhibit also includes the experiences of people who lived on the lake and worked there each summer as waitresses, cooks, laundry workers, guides and boatmen. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, May 7, 2014

The Third Annual Newcomb Loon Race

DSC_0105One of the first programs my family attended at the Adirondack Interpretive Center (AIC) was a Leopold Bench workshop. The day was devoted to learning  about Aldo Leopold, listening to a reading from A Sand County Almanac and walking the AIC trails. It was a full day of activity that my children still speak about fondly.

Though the agenda for the 3rd annual Loons and Logs Day on May 24th doesn’t include making a Leopold Bench, there is a full schedule of events that includes an  Adirondack chair workshop. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, May 6, 2014

An Adirondack Family’s Loss in the Civil War

Wilderness firesIt was the first time Grant had battled Lee. The two armies blundered into each other in deep woods just west of Fredericksburg, Virginia in early May of 1864. It would be known as the battle of the Wilderness. Grant’s Federal forces totaled over 101,000 to Confederate General Lee’s 61,000.  Fighting in the deep woods with their opposition obscured by acrid black powder smoke, the casualties were horrendous.

Only by the flash of the volleys of the forming line could they know their enemy. The woods lit up with flashes of musketry and according to one observer, the incessant roar of the volleys sounded like the crashing of thunderbolts. Brave men tumbled to the ground like autumn leaves in a windstorm. Through all this the 93rd New York continued to advance over a mile through a tangled forest, underbrush, and swamps – all while facing rifle and artillery fire.

Adding to the horror was that the woods caught fire. It had not rained for weeks and the explosions of the battle set the dry undergrowth on fire. Wounded men, unable to escape, were burned alive.  Those that escaped the fires were placed at quickly established aid stations. Some recovered; many did not. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Lake Placid Hall of Fame Seeking Nominations

Lake Placid Hall of FameThe Lake Placid Hall of Fame Committee is seeking nominations from residents of the Olympic region for 2014. The Hall of Fame began in 1983 and has inducted over 100 individuals, as well as the members of the 1948 U.S. Olympic four-man bobsled team and the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team. Plaques, commemorating each member, are on display in the Olympic Center’s Hall of Fame, located in the Conference Center at Lake Placid.

To be nominated, individuals should be past or current residents of the Olympic region or have some significant connection to the area. All nominees must have made significant sports, cultural or civic contributions to the region, or their endeavors must have enhanced the historical heritage of the Olympic region – defined as Essex, Clinton and Franklin counties in New York State. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Shoreline Landscaping Event in Lake George

plant_sale_3Vendors, exhibits, speakers and other activities to inspire attractive low impact shoreline landscaping will be featured at the “Stewardship with Style: A Lakescape Event” on Saturday May 10, 2014, from 9 am until 2 pm at Shepard Park in Lake George Village. Displays on rain gardens, shoreline buffers, permeable pavers, invasive species, and native plants, along with kids “make and take” crafts, and the Em2 River Model. There will also be prizes and giveaways. » Continue Reading.



Monday, May 5, 2014

Steve Hall: Be Grateful You’re Not A Moose

moose-wilmington-Brenda-Dadds-Woodward-092212-dQuick – which animal is most dangerous to humans in the United States? Ask State Farm, and they’ll tell you it’s the white-tailed deer, with about 150 people killed each year in auto accidents involving deer. Most lists cite mosquitoes (think West Nile), followed by bees (allergic reactions to stings), and brown recluse or black widow spiders. Domestic dogs kill about 30 people a year, horses and farm bulls about 20 each, while rattlesnakes and other venomous snakes (usually captive, handled snakes) kill about ten. If you mentioned bears, wolves or sharks, they don’t even make the list, though they always make a huge splash in the news.

Outside National Parks, bears tend to run from people, while wolves almost always flee, regardless of where you see them. Then there are moose. If moose don’t hear or smell your approach, they’re more likely to stand there, taking you in with that impassive gaze, assuming they acknowledge your presence at all. » Continue Reading.



Monday, May 5, 2014

William Merriam: Father Of The Modern Census

09 WR Merriam circa1890Few tasks were more daunting than a national census, as William Merriam would soon discover. Counting citizens was just the beginning. Policy makers needed to know how many were insane, feeble-minded, deaf, dumb, blind, criminals, and paupers. They needed social statistics of cities, information on public indebtedness, and valuation of properties, both personal and industrial.

And from farmers, the heart of the nation, much would be asked. To determine a farm’s size and value—the number and value of all animals, the acres planted and unused, how many acres were used for each fruit, vegetable, or grain, and more—310 questions were asked.

And it wasn’t just the United States that would be assessed. Information was needed on the populations of all cities, towns, villages, and boroughs covering the District of Columbia, Alaska, Hawaii, non-state territories, Indian territories, reservations, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Philippines, and Guam. Wherever the census applied, agriculture and manufacturing would be addressed in detail. » Continue Reading.



Monday, May 5, 2014

Comments Sought on Jay Mtn Wilderness Mining Plan

APA officeThe Adirondack Park Agency (APA) is accepting public comment on State Land Master Plan conformance for the recently submitted amendment to the 2010 Jay Mountain Wilderness Unit Management Plan (UMP).

The Jay Mountain Wilderness UMP amendment was proposed to ensure the UMP is consistent with the constitutional amendment approved by voters in November 2013 that permits exploratory sampling for the purposes of mining on the Forest Preserve parcel in the Town of Lewis, Essex County. The APA will accept written comments on this matter until June 2, 2014. » Continue Reading.



Monday, May 5, 2014

The New State Lands And Tourism

Boreas-600x343Two years ago, when Governor Andrew Cuomo revived the massive Finch, Pruyn land deal, first engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy in 2007, he shifted the terms of a long-running debate over big land-conservation projects in the Park. Funding for open-space conservation had been under attack in Albany for years, including a moratorium on new spending. Even many Democrats were questioning the value to taxpayers of protecting more “forever wild” land in the Park.

The governor turned that debate on its head, arguing that vast tracts of new public lands would be a boon to the state’s tourism economy—rather than a costly burden—and would give struggling Adirondack towns a long-needed boost. “Today’s agreement will make the Adirondack Park one of the most sought-after destinations for paddlers, hikers, hunters, sportspeople, and snowmobilers,” Cuomo declared in August 2012 as he committed the state to spending $47 million on sixty-nine thousand acres of timberlands over five years.

Cuomo pointed to “extraordinary new outdoor recreational opportunities” that he asserted would spark investment and help revitalize the tourism economy in struggling mountain towns. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, May 4, 2014

The Cabin on Raquette Lake’s Indian Point: A New Mystery

SONY DSCMy cousin Stephen FitzPatrick’s curiosity was peeked by my writings.  A piece of the puzzle had always been in his hands but he did not know it.  Prompted by my last article, Stephen searched through boxes of his mother’s memorabilia and found the photo at left.

It’s dated 1910, the year of construction according to our family’s oral history.  Could this be the first photo of the little red cabin?  Our previous research had narrowed the window in time to between 1905 and 1918.  This would appear to squeeze the date of construction to a mere five year period between 1905 and 1910. It was time to see what evidence I could find of the Thachers on Indian Point between the pages of books, newspaper articles and letters. » Continue Reading.



Sunday, May 4, 2014

Cabin Life: Some Big Decisions

The New GirlsRainy and in the forties.  This is the worst type of weather I face all year.  I know, the snow is just gone, and I had to have my chickens live in a tent in my kitchen for a few nights, but hiking in and saving the chickens from the bitter cold were easy decisions.  This weather presents a much tougher decision:  whether to burn the precious little dry wood I have left.

Even with a few weeks off from the cabin this winter, my wood supply is quite low now.  The wood I found over the winter isn’t quite dry enough to burn, and it’s a tough call to use up wood when it’s still above freezing.  If the temperature doesn’t dip too low, I’ll bundle up with a sleeping bag and run the little propane heater for a little while in the morning before it warms up outside.  But this cold damp calls for a fire. » Continue Reading.



Saturday, May 3, 2014

Lost Brook Dispatches: Peak Envy

Blue MountainDuring our recent spring adventure to Lost Brook we enjoyed three uncommon views that celebrated the prominence of three dominating Adirondack Peaks, plus a fourth view that is common but remains one of my favorites.  The common view was Blue Mountain from the crest of Highway 30 between Tupper Lake and Long lake.  I love this view because it is a true vista, which gives a greater sensation of size and vertical.  Vistas are rare in the Adirondacks, at least vistas that render a higher mountain in all its glory.  Blue was already largely snow free but its characteristic bulk from that Route 30 vantage point never fails to draw a breath from me in any season.

The other three views benefited from the calendar.  This time of year enhances the sense of a mountain’s scale, with earth tones and green on the lower slopes and plenty of white on high.  The Adirondacks may not be perpetually snow-capped, but in late April or early May we can imagine they are and they seem much more lofty for it. » Continue Reading.



Friday, May 2, 2014

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


Tags:

Friday, May 2, 2014

Ed Kanze: Heat, Sweat, And A Well-Cooked Steak

warning-hotIs it possible to survive time spent in a room so hot that it could fry a steak and eggs? Listen to my tale of a famous series of experiments conducted in England in 1775.

Two of the great botanists of the time, Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, braved the inferno with only minor discomfort and lived to tell the tale. The action heats up in this week’s edition of All Things Natural with Ed Kanze. » Continue Reading.



Friday, May 2, 2014

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


Tags: ,

Friday, May 2, 2014

Adirondack Club and Resort Update:
Appellate Court Oral Arguments

Adirondack Club and Resort MapIn so far as a judicial ruling expected later this year, nothing can be determined by the questions the judges posed this week regarding the Adirondack Club and Resort, that precedent-setting subdivision near Tupper Lake still being litigated. But the questions raised by several of the judges on the Appellate Court in Albany (and answers given) were interesting because they were unexpected (by me, anyway) and largely unrelated to the big, controversial issues surrounding the spreading out of the Great Camps, the use of the Resource Management lands for exurban sprawl development that is neither “on substantial acreages or in small clusters on carefully selected and well designed sites” (quoting the APA Act), or about the lack of substantive information in the hearing record about the project’s financing, marketing, sales and tax projections. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, May 1, 2014

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (May 1)

adk0122093
This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. The report can also be found at Mountain Lake PBS.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.



Thursday, May 1, 2014

Deer Brook: Photographing Water In Springtime

BJW_3567Spring time brings higher water levels in the streams, brooks, and rivers in the area.  This makes for a great opportunity to capture waterfalls and babbling brooks.  The trick to these shots is a long shutter speed, which blurs the flowing water, giving it that silky smooth look.  The effect will start to appear at around a 5 second exposure; the photo above is a 30 second exposure.  To get exposures this long you will want to reduce your ISO (100), use a larger aperture (f11), and shoot in low-light.  Typically it is best to shoot these photos in early morning or late evening.  Adding a neutral density (ND) filter will allow you to shoot in brighter conditions.  This photo was shot with a 10 stop ND filter at around 10am.  Finally, long exposures such as this will require a tripod or resting the camera on a solid surface.



Thursday, May 1, 2014

Homeschool Day At The Wild Center May 8th

Adirondack Wild CenterOn Thursday, May 8th, The Wild Center will offer a day designed exclusively for homeschoolers with programs normally available to school groups.

Live Animal Encounters, Otter Enrichments and an assortment of feature films, programs for all ages, are scheduled. Special programs featuring Planet Adirondack are planned for Pre-K to 4th grade (Owl Moon) and 5th grade and up (What in the World?). » Continue Reading.



Thursday, May 1, 2014

A New Variation To An Old Chapel Pond Climb

Phil raps Sebastian webI’d guess anyone who climbs regularly in the Adirondacks has climbed Chapel Pond Slab. For beginners, it’s a great place to get a feel for the exposure and intricacies of multi-pitch climbing. For the more experienced, it’s a place to relax and enjoy the beauty of the stone and the views of Chapel Pond Pass.

The most popular climb on the slab is Regular Route, with a half-dozen interesting and varied pitches. Not much is known about the history of Regular Route. The guidebook Adirondack Rock says it evolved from variations of an early route called Bob’s Knob Standard. The region’s first climbing guidebook, A Climber’s Guide to the Adirondacks, says it was pioneered by the Alpine Club of Canada.

» Continue Reading.



Page 30 of 324« First...1020...2829303132...405060...Last »
7ads6x98y