Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Environment: Living Machines and Water Resources

What follows is a guest essay by Layne Darfler, a junior at Paul Smith’s College majoring in Environmental Studies. She is from Hudson Falls, NY. This is part of our series of essays by young people from Paul Smith’s College.

What if there were a way to become more sustainable and recycle more than the everyday paper, plastic, or cans? What if we could recycle nature? It seems almost impossible since the guy on TV just told us the Earth is dying, but in reality there is a lot we can still do to help our planet. How about recycling the rain? » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Adirondack Family Time:
World’s Biggest Disc Golf Weekend

Disc GolfIn its 23rd year, this year’s World’s Biggest Disc Golf Weekend will be hosted in 15 countries and over 140 locations throughout the United States. This Saturday, May 5, the only Adirondack location registered for this annual event is Keeseville’s Ausable Chasm Campground. 

Recreational Manager Chuck Fries says, “We are offering free admission and free disc rentals all Saturday from 11:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m. We have a local league that will start earlier and later have a mixed doubles tournament. We hope people will come out and see what a fun sport this is.”

Fries confirms that the event is geared toward the novice in mind. From 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. league members and experienced players will be on site to show people how to play disc golf. Fries will even have league players and volunteers available to join novices on the course to demonstrate strategies. Though anyone can come, sign out a disc and play the Ausable Chasm course at any time throughout the day.

“This is a great family activity and lifelong sport,” says Fries. “It is low-impact. We can bring our young daughter and walk the courses while she enjoys nature. My wife and I used to mountain bike and have had to put that sport on hold for a bit. We can’t share that with our daughter quite yet. Disc golf is a great way to bring the whole family together and spend time outdoors. It is less frustration than regular golf to play right from the start.”

The late Ed Headrick is known as the father of the modern day Frisbee and of the game Disc Golf.  Headrick, of California, also invented the first disc golf basket and designed and installed the first course. While working at Wham-O, Headrick was credited with the first patent for modern day Frisbee. He helped develop the sport in the 70’s even establishing the first disk golf tournament in 1979.

Similar to traditional golf, disc golf has various weighted Frisbee-like discs that serve as driver, midrange and putter. According to Fries, anyone that has played mini-golf can tackle disc golf. Instead of a ball and club, it is a disc into a metal basket. He recommends for beginners to start with one disc and not worry about the various sized discs. For those a bit more adventurous, he suggests sticking around for the evening festivities that will consist of glow-in-the dark discs and lighted baskets.

“Beginners have a hard time throwing the driver. If they start with the mid-range or putter, it throws more like a traditional Frisbee,” says Fries. “One of the great features of the Ausable Chasm course is that it is heavily wooded and not so easy to lose a disc.”

The World’s Biggest Disc Golf Weekend is May 5 from 11:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m. Call 518-834-9990 for more information.  There are grills and tables available for those wishing to bring a picnic.

Diane Chase is the author of Adirondack Family Time Your Four-Season Guide to over 300 activities in Lake Placid and the High Peaks. Her second guidebook for the Champlain Valley will be in stores this summer 2012.


Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Spring Turkey Season Opens Today

The 2012 spring turkey season opens today (May 1) in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary. An analysis of the 2011 spring turkey take, including a county-by-county breakdown, can be found on the DEC website. Take figures for the 2011 fall turkey season and county-by-county breakdown can also be found online.

DEC is looking for turkey hunters to participate in their ruffed grouse drumming survey as hunters are ideally suited for monitoring ruffed grouse during the breeding season. Turkey hunters can record the number of grouse they hear drumming while afield to help DEC track the distribution and abundance of this game bird. To get a survey form, go online or call (518) 402-8886. To participate in DEC’s Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey or other wildlife surveys visit the “Citizen Science” page of the DEC website. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Phil Brown: More on Charging for Rescues

Stephen Mastaitis after rescue on Mount Marcy.A series of searches in the High Peaks last winter sparked a debate over whether careless hikers should be charged for the cost of rescuing them.

The Adirondack Almanack published several posts on the subject, including one by me in which I argued against charging hikers. Thinking the public would like to hear other opinions, I later assigned a reporter, Kelly de la Rocha, to look into the issue for Adirondack Explorer.

Tony Goodwin, editor of the Adirondack Mountain Club’s High Peaks guidebook, thinks fining hikers in cases of gross carelessness might be a deterrent. “As long as we accept the fact that we want to encourage people to use the backcountry, there are going to be accidents that have to be dealt with and there are going to be people who are unprepared, but perhaps the most grossly unprepared, unknowledgeable ones can suffer some consequences that perhaps [would] give pause for others,” he said. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 30, 2012

Spring Visitors: Ladybug Beetles

Among the many groups of insects that exist on our planet, the most abundant, diverse and ecologically successful are the beetles. And while many of these hard-shelled bugs are viewed as ugly and unwanted by humans, the ladybug beetle is considered to be one of the most attractive and environmentally friendly creatures in nature.

With a conspicuous dome-shaped, orange shell marked with black spots, the ladybug is difficult to mistake for any other invertebrate. Like all insects, there are numerous species of ladybugs that reside in our region, and the subtle differences in the color and pattern of its markings is the common means of distinguishing among the members of this insect group. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 30, 2012

North Country Poets: Benjamin Franklin Taylor

In 1996, the Academy of American Poets designated April as National Poetry Month. Each year, the goal is to bring attention to “the art of poetry, to living poets, [and] to our complex poetic heritage.” In support of that effort, the focus here is on Benjamin Franklin Taylor, historically one of the North Country’s greatest poets, writers, and lecturers.

Born in Lowville (Lewis County) in 1819, Taylor was a precocious child whose writing abilities were evident at a young age. He attended Lowville Academy (his father, Stephen William Taylor, also attended LA and later became principal), and then entered Madison University in Hamilton, New York (where his father was a mathematics professor and would later become college president). Madison was renamed Colgate University in 1890. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 30, 2012

Slush Pile: Whiteface Skiing and Climate Change

What follows is a guest essay by Kirsten L. Goranowski, a 2012 graduate of Paul Smith’s College with a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Studies. This is part of our series of essays by young people from Paul Smith’s College.

It was a rainy wait for the Face Lift chairlift at the base of Whiteface Mountain on March 9th. I overheard a woman complain to her husband about the unpleasant weather. There was mention of an alternative plan for the day. I myself contemplated an alternative, yet I had bought a season pass and still had to get my money’s worth. Winter of 2010-2011 was the first time I picked up the sport of snowboarding, and I’m now questioning whether any of it was a worthwhile investment. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 29, 2012

Stoddard’s Natural Views Exhibit Opening May 4th

Long considered beautiful photographs of the Adirondack landscape, Seneca Ray Stoddard’s views also serve as documents of the plants that inhabited the region in the 19th century. Since he was rediscovered in the late 1970s, Stoddard’s work has been featured in numerous exhibits that explored the history of 19th century life in the Adirondacks. A survey of the 3,000 images in the Chapman Historical Museum archives, however, revealed hundreds of images that are purely natural landscapes. The subject matter is the Adirondack environment – not great hotels, steamers, camp scenes or other obvious evidence of human activity. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 29, 2012

Cabin Life: Living With Wildlife

There’s a soft, wet blanket of snow covering everything. It’s also eerily quiet. The last two mornings I’ve been woken by a yellow-bellied sapsucker banging on the metal roof of the wood shed. And the morning before that, Pico woke me up barking at the turkeys that were walking by. Today, the birds are silent. The rabbits that are all over out here are brown on top and white on the bottom.

It’s an interesting sight as they sprint down the road in view of my headlights, then dart off into the woods. All winter, I saw lots of rabbit tracks, but no actual animals. Now that there is no snow and they are that awkward combination of colors, I see them all the time. Their winter camouflage obviously works well. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 28, 2012

The Adirondack Regiment in the Civil War:
“The Home Voices Speak Louder than the Drums”

What follows is a guest essay by Wanda Burch has spent 42 years in historic preservation. She recently retired as site manager of Johnson Hall State Historic Site and now serves as Vice-President of Friends of Johnson Hall. She is a regular contributor to the online news magazine New York History.

On August 7, 1862, Henry Graves, physically exhausted from walking, fighting, and from four days detail digging trenches under a Petersburg, Virginia, sun and not “a breath of air stirring,” sat down and wrote to his wife, describing the importance of the imagination to survival. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 28, 2012

Lost Brook Dispatches: Trailblazing

Of all the deep, wild urges rooting around in my head (god knows there is a subject that could turn away scores of readers), said urges being imbued in every way with the powerful, primeval pull of the Adirondack landscape, the strongest has always been trailblazing.

The fantasy of traveling on foot into parts unknown, marking a path like a scout of lore, has been the adventure that has most fired my imagination and passion. It is simply the most romantic thing of which I can conceive. » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 27, 2012

New Look Coming For Adirondack Almanack

We’re going to see some long-awaited changes here at the Almanack! A minor redesign planned for this weekend is the very first step in implementing a lot of the ideas that have been in the hopper for the past few years. I say minor, because the site will look and feel pretty much the same on the front side. There will be some exciting changes however, including new ‘departments’ to feature our bigger coverage areas and provide readers easier access to the stories you’re interested in most. There may be some brief outages while we make the change.

We’re going to begin this evening (Friday) and should be done by Monday. Except for a short time this evening when the actual transfer happens, the site should be up and running. There will likely be a delay for some readers, depending on how quickly some ISPs update their DNS entries, but everything should be back to normal for everyone by Sunday night. E-mail subscriptions, RSS, Facebook, and Twitter feeds should continue as usual.

This is a great time to say thanks to all our readers and contributors over the past seven years. The Almanack wouldn’t exist without the hard work of our nearly 30 contributors and the generous attention of our readers.

Thanks to all of you the Almanack is an outstanding example of community journalism – and there’s more to come!

Enjoy this fall – er, spring – weather, and we’ll see you on the other side of the mountain.

John Warren
Editor, Adirondack Almanack


Friday, April 27, 2012

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights

On Friday afternoons Adirondack Almanack compiles for our readers a collection of the week’s top weblinks. You can find all our weekly web round-ups here.

Subscribe! More than 7,500 people get Adirondack Almanack each day via RSS, E-Mail, or Twitter or Facebook updates. It’s a convenient way to get the latest news and information about the Adirondacks.


Friday, April 27, 2012

Adirondack Events This Weekend (April 27)

We’ve gathered the best links to regional events calendars all in one place. Visit the Adirondack Almanack every Friday to find out everything that’s happening around the Adirondacks.

The Almanack also provides weekly back-country conditions and hunting and fishing reports for those headed into the woods or onto the waters this weekend.

Region-wide Events This Weekend

Lake George Region Events

Lake Placid Region Events This Weekend

Old Forge Area Events This Weekend

Tupper Lake Region Events This Weekend


Friday, April 27, 2012

John Brown Day Planned for May 5th

Frederick Douglass’ great-great-great grandson Kenneth B. Morris, Jr., will give the keynote address at the annual John Brown Day celebration to be held on Saturday, May 5, at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site in Lake Placid, NY. Morris will talk about the friendship and enduring legacy of Douglass and fellow abolitionist John Brown.

The two men first met in Massachusetts in 1848, a decade after Douglass successfully escaped from slavery on a Maryland plantation and eleven years before Brown’s history-changing raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. By the time they met, Douglass had become one of the most eloquent and sought-after champions of freedom and equal suffrage for women and men, regardless of race.

Founder and President of the Frederick Douglass Family Foundation, Morris will also discuss the Foundation’s work today to create a modern Abolitionist Movement in schools all over the country through the vehicle of Service-Learning.

There are an estimated 27 million men, women and children held in some form of slavery in the world today, generating billions of dollars along the supply chain of labor and products that make much of our daily lives possible.

Joining Morris will be Renan Salgado, a Human Trafficking Specialist based in Rochester, who will shed light in his remarks about slavery and trafficking in New York State today. According to the U.S. State Department, there are approximately 17,500 people trafficked into the U.S. each year. Along with California, Texas, and Florida, New York ranks among the states with the greatest incidence of documented slavery in the country.

Young, award-winning orators from the Frederick Douglass Student Club in Rochester will recite from Douglass’ speeches and excerpts from Brown’s letters. The folk quartet The Wannabees and the hip-hop recording artist S.A.I. will also perform.

John Brown Day revives the tradition dating back to the 1930s of making a pilgrimage to remember and honor Brown by laying a wreath at his grave. Over the last 13 years, the grassroots freedom education project John Brown Lives! has worked to keep that tradition alive and relevant.

John Brown Day 2012 is free and open to the public and it is held outdoors. A brief reception will follow in the lower barn at the site. Donations will be appreciated.

For more information, contact Martha Swan, Executive Director of John Brown Lives! at 518-962-4758 or mswan@capital.net.

Visit the John Brown Lives! Friends of Freedom on Facebook.


Page 380 of 632« First...102030...378379380381382...390400410...Last »