Monday, October 8, 2012

Adirondack Amphibians: Spring Peepers in Autumn

On calm, mild evenings in autumn, such as those that occurred last Wednesday and Thursday, a familiar sound may be heard coming from a stand of trees close to an alder thicket or a woodland swamp. A crisp, one-note “peep” infrequently breaks the silence in these wooded settings at night and during the day when the air is unseasonably warm and moist.

This distinct call can perplex anyone who has visited a wetland in spring. Can it possibly be a spring peeper, known for producing the seasonal chorus of natural music after the soil thaws in April? Following a summer of silence, the male spring peeper redevelops an urge to announce its presence, this time in the area in which it may have spent the past several months.
» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 8, 2012

George Chahoon: Reconstruction Era ‘Carpetbagger’

George Chahoon, a man who lived in the North Country for 60 years, mostly in Ausable Forks, was the focus of two of the most remarkable incidents in the Reconstruction Era following the Civil War. When the South seceded, it had named Richmond, Virginia, as its capital city. During the post-war years, appointees chosen by the military were placed in power to guide the recovery, and in 1868, George Chahoon, a native of Chenango County, New York, but a Virginia resident for most of his 28 years, was installed as mayor of Richmond, replacing a popular leader who had served in the position for 15 years.

On January 26, 1870, President Grant signed the official act allowing Virginia’s readmission to the Union. Among the new laws passed by the Virginia legislature was one known as the “Enabling Act.” This law allowed the governor to appoint councilmen in any city (there were no town or city governments in place after defeat), and the councilmen were in turn tasked with appointing municipal officers, including mayors.
» Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 7, 2012

Cabin Life: A Bear And The Bizarro World

If you’ve never heard of Bizarro World, then you didn’t read Superman comics as a kid.  Well I didn’t either, but I learned about it in an episode of Seinfeld.  I am in my own personal Bizarro World right now, flying about thirty thousand feet on my way to South Carolina via Chicago.  And I can’t think of any place that could be farther from my simple lifestyle.  This is as far from simple as you can get.

The guy sitting next to me has commandeered the armrest, which I guess is alright since we’re in an exit row.  You have to take the good with the bad.  I’m also pretty sure he is reading  what I write.  It’s OK for you to keep the armrest; I have the aisle, and that’s a fair trade.

It has been simple out at the cabin.  The leaves are gorgeous and in the Northern Adirondacks peak leaf season is just about over.  The red carpet of leaves on the trails is so bright it almost hurts your eyes, and the yellows, oranges and golds overhead create the appearance of a nice bright day even when it’s overcast and rainy.  But those random shafts of light that penetrate the trees bring out so much color it’s a wonder to behold. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 6, 2012

Adirondack Books: Recent Locally Set Fiction

Three books published this year by brand-new novelists remind us of the rich literary opportunities the Adirondacks offer for writers. History, nature, and mystery unite in three novels set in the Adirondacks by three seemingly disparate authors.

Tibetta’s World, historical nonfiction writer Caperton Tissot’s first novel, offers a deeply class-conscious historical and philosophical look into great camp life.  Barbara Delaney, a hiking guide and co-author with husband Russell Dunn of the historically minded hiking guides Trails with Tales, has brought forward Finding Griffin a family mystery centered on a town reclaimed by the Adirondack forest. Finally, Florida lawyer and part-time Bolton resident Thomas G. Kane has published his second novel Desperate Days, a continuation of his first hard-boiled Adirondack Matt O’Malley mystery thriller featuring a dabbling of Adirondack history and landscape, and the Russian mob. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 6, 2012

How Much Wilderness is Enough?

A week ago last Monday I was in my kitchen preparing for my classes and enjoying a cup of coffee.  I loaded up the Almanack and read the just-published article by Phil Brown about his trip to the Boreas Ponds as part of Governor Cuomo’s visit.

I enjoyed it and found it informative.  It certainly whetted my appetite for seeing the ponds in person.  A couple of predictable comments had been logged on the article but nothing that really grabbed my attention.  I finished my coffee and got on with my day. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 5, 2012

This Week’s Adirondack Web Highlights


Friday, October 5, 2012

Adirondack Events This Weekend (Oct 5)

We’ve gathered the best links to regional events calendars all in one place. Visit the Adirondack Almanack every Friday to find out everything that’s happening around the Adirondacks.

The Almanack also provides weekly back-country conditions reports for those headed into the woods or onto the waters this weekend.

Region-wide Events This Weekend » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 5, 2012

This Week’s Top Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, October 4, 2012

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (Oct 5)

This weekly Adirondack conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round.

Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WNBZ (AM 920 & 1240, FM 105 & 102.1), WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio.

 

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 4, 2012

Remembering Warrensburg’s Movie House

“The movie theater and the church often existed side by side in a small town,” the late novelist John Updike once remarked in an interview. “The old Hollywood movies were very pious. Sins were punished in exact proportion to their seriousness. In many ways, the movies carried religious weight.”

Updike grew up in the 1940s, and by the 1960s, when I was growing up in Warrensburg, the movies may have played a smaller role in shaping moral habits, but they did help fire one’s own imagination, and, for that matter, the collective imagination. » Continue Reading.


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