Saturday, August 13, 2016

Bobcat Ranney and Howard Zahniser: An Exchange of Letters

Bobcat Picture from Adirondack MuseumIn Summer 1946, at the invitation of Paul and Carolyn Schaefer, Howard and Alice Zahniser and family made their first trip to the Adirondacks, from their home in Maryland where Howard had begun work with The Wilderness Society. Zahnie, as he was known, had met Paul Schaefer and Schaefer’s mentor John Apperson that February at the 1946 North American Wildlife Conference in New York City. There, Schaefer and Apperson showed their film about dam threats to Forest Preserve wilderness in the western Adirondacks.

It was Wilderness Society policy that any threat to wilderness must be considered a national issue. Accordingly, at the Conference Zahnie offered Schaefer the Society’s help to fight the series of dam proposals in what became known as the Black River Wars. Paul had suggested then that Zahnie and family visit the Schaefer family and their Adirondack camp off Edwards Hill Road out of Bakers Mills, New York, the coming summer. It was there that he met Archie “Bobcat” Ranney.  The day the Zanhisers left Washington, D.C., a letter arrived from Ranney, addressed from Bakers Mills: » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 13, 2016

Cycle Adirondacks Community Concert Series Announced

boys greeting ridersWildlife Conservation Society has announced its Cycle Adirondacks 2016 Community Concert Series lineup. The August 20-27 road cycling tour will feature seven consecutive evenings of free entertainment in six different Adirondack communities.

Each venue is open to the public and offers a beer garden featuring Good Nature Farm Brewery and local food concessions. Entertainment begins at 7 pm nightly. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 12, 2016

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, August 12, 2016

Recent Crop Study Shows Good Results For Ginger

freshly harvested gingerThe farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program has released the results of field trials indicating that fresh market baby ginger produced by regional growers can sell for four times the price of conventional ginger sold in stores.

But should every grower start planting ginger?

The market potential of ginger as a season extension and profit builder for Northern New York growers was evaluated as part of the Advancing Season Extension and Protected Culture Efficiency Project funded by the farmer-driven research program. The project also included enterprise budgeting for growing the high-value alternative high-tunnel crops of ginger, turmeric, summer lettuce and basil. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 12, 2016

DEC Announces New Hunting Regs, Youth Bear Hunt

DEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has unveiled new regulations concerning deer and bear hunting.

These regulations increase opportunities for hunters 14 and 15 years old to kill black bears, reduce antler-less kills in the western Adirondacks, clarify when special season tags may be used by bow and muzzleloader hunters, and more.

The new bear hunting regulation now includes the taking of bears in the youth firearms hunt over Columbus Day weekend that was previously a deer-only event. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 12, 2016

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Adirondack History: Old Wooden Water Pipes

wooden water pipes 1 When you turn on your kitchen faucet you probably don’t give it much thought, yet it’s a marvel of modern history.

For centuries, to get water into the house it was necessary to fill your buckets from a fast moving stream and lug them home. Later, you might have filled them from a well or cistern, but still had the chore of lugging them back to the house. Every drop of water you wanted for drinking, cooking or washing had to be transported this way and it was a seemingly endless task. In winter, you might have to carry an axe with you so you could break through the ice that had formed overnight. Here in the Adirondacks, wells were sometimes dug right under the house so getting water wouldn’t be quite so arduous, especially in winter. Common indoor plumbing with water to a faucet didn’t arrive in most homes in the Adirondacks until the 20th century. But there were exceptions, one of which was the LeRay Mansion near the town of Leraysville in Jefferson County. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Outdoor Conditions in the Adirondacks (Aug 11)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is issued each Thursday afternoon and can be heard at North Country Public Radio on Friday mornings.

Sunrise Saturday in Lake Placid will be at 5:57 am; sunset at 8:03 pm, providing 14 hours and 4 minutes of sunlight. The Moon will rise at 4:24 pm Saturday and set at 2:11 am Sunday morning. The Moon will be Waxing Gibbous, 77% illuminated.

Perseid Meteor Shower: Earth has entered the stream of debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle, which is the source of the annual Perseid Meteor Shower. This year the meteor shower is expected to be heavier than normal, with forecasters calling for as many as 200 per hour during the peak, August 11-13 – Thursday night will be the best night to see the maximum number of meteors, weather permitting.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Crown Point Encampment, Battle Reenactment This Weekend

British Landing photo courtesy of NYS ParksCrown Point State Historic Site will host its annual French and Indian War Encampment on August 13 and 14, 2016. This is the largest event of the year at the site and features authentically clad French, British, and Native American participants camped among the fort ruins. Guests to the camp are able to interact with the participants portraying various people of Crown Point’s past and also have the opportunity to purchase some of the 18th century wares produced and exhibited by artisans and merchants. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Sewage Spills And Algal Blooms

lake champlain no swimming signEvery year heavy rains in the Northeast cause wastewater treatment plants to reach and exceed capacity, with attendant overflows and sewage spills directly into lakes and rivers. Population growth, aging infrastructure and increased storm intensity are resulting in wastewater treatment plants legally allowing overflow of untreated sewage into waterways. This has included both raw sewage and graywater. Outdated and inadequate infrastructure (both public and private) are lending to the potential increase in toxic algal blooms and pathogens within the waters we drink from and recreate in.

When wastewater spills or is dumped into a body of water, it contains pharmaceuticals, synthetic hormones, pollutants and nutrients that can feed algal growth. There is an impact to the aquatic ecosystem from raw sewage or partially treated effluent that makes their way into our freshwater resources. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Adirondack Diversity Symposium On Saturday

adk diversity advisory council logoThe Adirondack Diversity Advisory Council (ADAC)’s 2016 Symposium, “Towards a More Diverse Adirondacks,” will be held this Saturday, August 13th at the SUNY ESF Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.

This year’s theme is the intersection of diversity, economics and social justice. The symposium will engage attendees with business and economic leaders from throughout the Adirondacks and New York State in a dialogue about vital ways in which this intersection can make life better for everyone in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Legendary North Country Athlete Big Bill Palmer

P1A 1901PalmerHdlineLargely forgotten due to the passage of time, Fort Covington native William “Big Bill” Palmer is one of the most successful athletes ever born in the North Country. And yet the period during which he reached remarkable heights at two levels of the same sport lasted just over two years. Even more surprising is that he played on a team still recognized today as legendary in the world of college athletics.

Born in 1875 to William and Catherine Palmer on a Fort Covington farm in northern Franklin County, New York, Bill displayed unusual athletic ability at a young age. At fairs, Fourth of July celebrations, and Field Days, his name was always prominent among those participating in sporting events. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 10, 2016

259th Anniversary Fort William Henry Surrender

Soldiers-lined-upEach year the Surrender of Fort William Henry is honored by a wreath laying ceremony, a reenactment and the reading of the official Articles of Surrender on the museum’s lawn overlooking Lake George.  According to Fort William Henry Museum Director Melody Viele, this annual anniversary focuses on the importance of the French and Indian War.

“The Colonies learned to fight during the French and Indian War,” says Viele. “It was the first event to unite the colonists. They joined together to fight the French. Later the British tried to recoup their expenses through taxes, which inadvertently led to the Revolutionary War.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 10, 2016

DEC’s Conservationist Magazine To Go Digital

conservationist magazineNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that the agency’s outdoor magazine The Conservationist, published since 1946, will now be available in both print and digital editions.

The digital edition will offer subscribers additional content, including video and audio files and more pictures.

For a limited time, the digital version of the August 2016 issue is being made available free of charge for all to see here. Current subscribers to the print edition who have provided an e-mail address will be notified when new digital issues become available.

The August edition includes articles on clamming, incredible pictures of dragonflies, and a thrilling piece on how Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger made a successful emergency landing of U.S. Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River after both of the plane’s engines were disabled by hitting Canada geese in flight. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Adirondack Plein Air Festival: Nocturnes And Quick-Draws

Painting of an artist, by Patricia Bellerose, of OntarioThe 8th annual Adirondack Plein Air Festival begins on Aug 15 and not only is it a bunch of artists painting outdoors, but it has “nocturnes” and “quick draws” too! Almost 70 artists from all over the US, Quebec and Ontario, will converge on the village of Saranac Lake in order to paint the beauty of the Adirondack region, much like the Hudson River School painters of the mid 1800’s.

In the 8 years of the Festival, those artists have probably equaled, if not surpassed, the number of paintings created during the 50 years the Hudson River School was popular. » Continue Reading.


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