Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Adirondack Woofstock: A Weekend of Peace, Paws & Music

woofstockPlanning has begun for this year’s Adirondack Woof Stock – A Weekend of Peace, Paws & Music, being held June 18-19, 2016 in Chestertown. Last year about 3,000 people attended with an estimated 1,000 dogs over the two day event.

Organizers are reporting that there is room for more vendors, pet groomers, fence companies, a pet photograper, dog trainers, and other pet friendly vendors interested in attending. Vendor space is $50 for the weekend. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 20, 2016

CATS Announces 2016 Grand Hike To Essex Inn

Champlain area trailsChamplain Area Trails (CATS) is hosting it’s third annual inn-to-inn hike on Saturday, May 14, 2016.  The 11-mile Grand Hike to the Essex Inn will take place on CATS hiking trails and scenic back roads from Wadhams to the Essex Inn, where there will be a block party celebration featuring live music, restorative yoga and chair massage provided by Lake Champlain Yoga & Wellness, kids crafts and a photo booth to commemorate the event.

Check-in is from 12:15 to 1:30 pm across from Dogwood Bakery in Wadhams. Participants are encouraged to park in Essex where, starting at 12:15 pm, free shuttles will take them from the Essex Inn to Wadhams.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 20, 2016

3rd Annual Pete Seeger Tribute Planned For Saranac Lake

Pete Seeger and Clearwater Dona-Crawford-autunm_040-300x225The 3rd Annual Pete Seeger Tribute, “Float the Boat,” will take place on May 7th at 7 pm at the First Presbyterian Church of Saranac Lake.

Nearly 50 years ago Pete Seeger saw that the Hudson River was struggling from over-development and pollution, and felt that if people had intimate contact with the river they would want to help protect it. Seegar and his wife Toshi spearheaded an effort to build the Hudson river sloop Clearwater to take folks onto the river and into its communities. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Land of the Heathens: The Wildest Adirondacks Ever!

BishopRHNelsonFervent pleas for aid to missionaries around the world are common, and by no means a recent phenomenon. Take, for instance, the effort led by Episcopalian Bishop Richard H. Nelson in the Albany area in 1913. Said the Glens Falls Daily Times, “It is the intention of Bishop Nelson to organize a missionary league in the diocese for the purpose of raising sufficient money to carry on the work of building up parishes in the neglected sections.” Nelson displayed a map of those neglected sections, where, he said, “The condition is almost unbelievable.”

When I was much younger, one of the most beloved and respected teachers in our local school left to work in the missions in Africa. She described many of the same problems voiced by Nelson: poverty, illiteracy, poor spiritual condition, and a disturbing lack of morals. In both cases (Nelson’s and the teacher’s), the viewpoint was from a devout Christian perspective (our teacher was a Catholic nun). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Gore Mountain Community Fund Accepting Grant Applications

community fund for the gore mountain regionThe Community Fund for the Gore Mountain Region (CFGMR) is accepting applications from area schools, municipalities, nonprofit, and community organizations for its 2016 grant cycle.

A component fund of Adirondack Foundation, CFGMR was established in 2005 and offers grants to organizations in the towns of Johnsburg, Chester, Minerva, Horicon and Schroon. Grants will support community beautification, historic preservation, culture and the arts, education, recreation, and programs for youth, seniors, and veterans. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Paul Hetzler: Black Flies Bite, Spiders Burn

spidersSpiders can be dangerous, but mostly in ways you would never imagine.

A couple of years ago a guy in Seattle burned his house down trying to kill spiders with a blowtorch. In 2015 at a Michigan gas station, a man tried to kill one with a lighter and burned up a pump island, narrowly escaping injury. And Mazda had to recall 42,000 vehicles in 2014 because spiders could clog a small fuel vent line with silk, potentially cracking the gas tank and causing a fire. It’s no wonder we are afraid of spiders, right?

Fear of spiders is so common and widespread, it may well be encoded in our DNA. Obviously it would have behooved early humans to learn to be wary of spiders, as a few species are poisonous. Mind you, it’s a tiny minority, but spiders can be hard to tell apart. If something with way too many legs and eyes scurries up our leg, most of us will swat first and ask questions later. It’s a rare person whose first reaction is “Great—hand it over so I can key it out!” when their partner announces there’s a big spider in the bed. You know that person is a hardcore nerd. And that they probably have a relationship issue to work out if they don’t want to sleep alone that night. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Volunteers Sought For US National Fly Fishing Championships

us national fly fishing tournamentThe nation’s best fly anglers will be returning to Lake Placid, Wilmington, Saranac Lake, Redford and Malone, June 1–4, 2016 for the U.S. National Fly Fishing Championships, and organizers are looking for volunteers to assist anglers over the three-day catch-and-release competition.

“The event relies on volunteers to record the size and species of every fish caught, and is a great opportunity for avid fishermen to learn from these top anglers and share local ‘intel’, too,” said Ken Crane, event and volunteer organizer. “Anglers will be fishing on the Ausable, Saranac and Salmon Rivers while wading, and Mirror Lake and Lake Colby from boats. No experience is required.” » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 18, 2016

You Found A Baby Animal: Now What?

Porcupine Baby PorcupetteSpring is here, which means baby season! Most mammals and birds in the northern hemisphere, are born in Spring to allow them time to mature physically before Winter, giving them a shot at survival, and many of us will find baby animals in our yards, or while hiking. What should you do?

If it’s a fawn, and it’s lying down, usually surrounded by shrubbery or tall grass, leave it alone. Mom is off browsing, getting the nutrition she’ll need to provide milk for her fawn, while the fawn is doing its job, staying hidden from predators. Thanks to natural selection, which favors prey which are harder to detect, and therefore more likely to survive to breed, and pass along their genes, fawns, as well as moose and elk calves, are nearly odor free, meaning predators like bears and coyotes will pretty much have to step on them to discover them, so get out of the area, as you may spook Mom, who may be watching, or worse, alert predators, who can definitely smell your presence, indicating there may be something of interest to investigate. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 18, 2016

2017 Winter Carnival Theme Is ‘Adirondack Wildlife’

saranac lake winter carnivalMembers of the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival Committee have chosen “Adirondack Wildlife” as the theme for the 2017 Carnival.

The theme was chosen from the top five ideas generated at the Committee’s March meeting which had been gathered from the public: Wizards and Dragons, Beach Party, Adirondack Fiesta, Adirondack Wildlife and Under the Big Top. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 18, 2016

Understanding Maple Syrup Color And Flavor

the outsider maple syrupSome years sugaring season goes by the book, which is to stay things starts cold, and over the course of four to six weeks spring arrives gradually and consistently. In such a scenario, the syrup usually starts out light colored and sweet, then as the weather warms and the microbial load in the sap increases, the color gets progressively darker and the flavor more complex. (What’s happening is the microbes are converting the sucrose in the sap to invert sugars, which leads to more caramelization and a different flavor profile.) Around the time the buds break, the biochemistry of the sap changes and it starts picking up some sometimes nasty off-flavors.

Then there are years like this, which don’t follow the script. I make syrup in southern Vermont, where we saw highs spike up into the seventies and lows plummet into the single digits. While the syrup color sort of tracked with the crazy temperatures, our last boil of the year produced syrup that had a light amber color and a dark, late-season flavor that left a weird aftertaste in your mouth. » Continue Reading.


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