Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Sultans of String Concert At The Arts Center Saturday

Sultans of StringThe Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts will continue its Saturday Series with the return of the Sultans of String on August 5th at 7:30 pm at the Arts Center.

“Three-time JUNO (Canada’s Grammy) nominees Sultans of String play messages of hope, alongside Gypsy-jazz, Arabic, Flamenco, Celtic and Cuban rhythms,” an event announcement says. “Celebrating 10 years together, Sultans of String have hit #15 on Billboard’s world music charts, #1 across Canada on world music charts, and received multiple awards and accolades, including a SiriusXM Award, 1st place in the ISC (out of 15,000 entries), 3 Canadian Folk Music Awards, plus invitations to perform/record with such luminaries as The Chieftains, Richard Bona, Ruben Blades, and Sweet Honey in the Rock.” » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 31, 2017

Ken Carter’s Plan To Jump A Car Over the St. Lawrence River

Bizarre. That’s the best description of events forty years ago when the North Country found itself the focus of national attention. I’m accustomed to researching much further back in time to write stories, but this one is a doozy that younger folks probably never heard of and older folks might have forgotten by now. It took place back in the 1970s when daredevils were popular, led by Evel Knievel, who became more famous for his failures — crashes resulting in multiple bone fractures — than his successes, where he landed safely and was unhurt.

Most of us who witnessed Knievel’s career will remember one jump above all others — Idaho’s Snake River Canyon. He performed on motorcycles, so the rocket-shaped vehicle he used in Idaho was named the Skycyle X-2. Canada’s answer to Evel Knievel was Ken Carter, a.k.a. the Mad Canadian, Kamikaze Ken, or Crazy Ken. He performed many times in upstate New York. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 31, 2017

Froehlich Foundation Continues Support of LGLC Efforts

lglc logoThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) has received a grant of $190,000 from the Helen V. Froehlich Foundation in continued support of focused conservation projects and initiatives to help protect the land that protects the lake forever.

The grant is expected to be used on priority projects, including $100,000 towards the LGLC’s Indian Brook/Northwest Bay Conservation Initiative, which includes focused land protection efforts in the Indian Brook and Northwest Bay watersheds in Bolton.

“Studies indicate that although Indian Brook is showing some impacts from development and other human activity, the watershed is still below the threshold of containing less than 10% of impervious surface, which is an indicator of overall health. Much of the watershed’s sensitive land is currently unprotected, however, leaving water quality vulnerable,” an LGLC press announcement said. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 31, 2017

Architecture Of Jeremiah Oosterbaan Outing In Plattsburgh Area

john xxiii college community newman centerAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the Adirondack region, will host an outing in Plattsburgh to focus on twentieth-century buildings designed by local architect Jeremiah Oosterbaan on Monday, July 31st. This outing supplements AARCH’s summer “Modern Architects” theme.

Participants will join AARCH Executive Director Steven Engelhart on a road trip through and around Plattsburgh to see several examples of Oosterbaan’s architecture, including municipal, religious, and residential buildings, including Temple Beth Israel, the Newman Center, the Plattsburgh Public Library, the Press-Republican, the Clinton County Government Center, St. Alexander’s Catholic Church, and Oosterbaan’s former residence in West Chazy on the shores of Lake Champlain.  » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 31, 2017

Literacy Volunteers Receives International Paper Grant

Mindy Malbon, LV student, Jamie Armstrong, LV tutor, and Marie Despres, LV DirectorLiteracy Volunteers of Essex and Franklin Counties (LVEF) has been awarded a grant of $2,000 by the International Paper Foundation. The grant is expected to be used to underwrite printing costs for the organization’s brochures, annual report, and newsletter.

Literacy Volunteers recruits and trains volunteer tutors to work one-on-one with students. Each tutor attends an accredited training program that gives them the skills to effectively tutor adult students in both basic literacy and English as a Second Language (ESL). LV then matches trained tutors with adult students in need of training in math, reading, ESL, digital literacy, or help with obtaining a High School Equivalency (HSE) qualification. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 30, 2017

Eastern Forest Birds Face Wintering Grounds Habitat Loss

Rose-breasted GrosbeakWithin the next few decades, human-caused habitat loss looms as the greatest threat to some North American breeding birds and the problem will be most severe on their wintering grounds, according to a new study published  in the journal Global Change Biology. By the end of this century, the study’s authors say predicted changes in rainfall and temperature will compound the problem for birds that breed in eastern North America and winter in Central America. Migrant wintering grounds are important because the birds spend a greater proportion of the year in these places.

The scientists ran dozens of scenarios to predict what the future might look like for 21 species, most of them flycatchers, vireos, and warblers. They used observations that volunteers entered into the eBird database from 2004 through 2014 to establish where and in what density the species are found throughout the year. Then, they layered in modeled climate change projections (temperature and rainfall) and habitat data (land-use changes and the location of protected areas). » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 30, 2017

Adirondack Insects: Forest Tent Caterpillars

forest tent caterpillarWalk through a hardwood forest this month and it may seem more like October than July. Trees that normally provide cool shade have bare crowns with just a hint of green. And is the bark on that sugar maple moving? This is not a trick of the light: you are, in fact, in the middle of a forest tent caterpillar outbreak.

Despite the name, forest tent caterpillars don’t actually build tents like their cousins the eastern tent caterpillars. Instead, you’ll find them congregated on silken mats on tree trunks or branches. If you’re in an infested area, they won’t be hard to find. Sugar maples and aspen are often the favorite host species in the Northeast, as well as birch, cherry, basswood, and ash. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 30, 2017

Being There: Forest Bathing and River Walking

riverwalk“We just completed our nature therapy training in May,” Helene Gibbons said when I met her last week at Origin Coffee in Saranac Lake. “We learned how to guide people to open their senses to the forest, to become immersed in the sights, smells, sounds and textures of the natural world.” As Helene is a yoga teacher, I saw how she could apply similar principles to meandering through the woods. She’s been guiding students through yoga poses and leading them into meditation for years.

“Suzanne Weirich and I traveled to Chicago for a seven day training at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois,” she continued. “With this Forest Therapy Guide Training we’re ready help people immerse themselves in the natural environment, called Forest Bathing.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Verplanck Colvin and Politics Today

Colvin HeadshotLast month we went to see Bill Killon’s documentary, “Colvin: Hero of the North Woods” at the Adirondack History Museum in Elizabethtown. Surveyor and forest-preserve advocate Verplanck Colvin has always been something of a hero of mine, and not because he has the funniest name associated with the Adirondacks. He doesn’t. He doesn’t even have the funniest name beginning with V, an honor that goes to — and I assume I will get no argument here — the mountain that goes by the name of Vanderwhacker.

It’s an excellent film, drawing on the observations of a veritable Mount Rushmore of contemporary Adirondack voices, and deftly and artfully edited by Killon to show Colvin’s strengths, weaknesses and complexities. In a classic touch, an Adirondack downpour lends a comforting background serenade to an interview with Tony Goodwin, symbolic, perhaps, of the waters that Colvin was so inclined to protect. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Vermont’s ‘Seven Days’ Adirondacks Issue 2017

seven days coverFrom the west coast of Vermont, we really enjoy our sunsets — thanks, ‘Dacks!

Once a year, Seven Days’ ventures across the lake to see what we can see.

This time, we explored Craigardan, a new artist retreat with an agricultural twist, in Keene. In Essex, we met two farmers whose CSA caters events from the ground up. In Chazy, we explored reminders of philanthropist William H. Miner’s contributions to the North Country.

We walked the High Peaks with summit stewards — and witnessed the poop problem along the trails. (Eww.) And, in the age of President Donald Trump and congressional mayhem, we had to ask whether New York Republican Congresswoman Elise Stefanik might lose her seat if we lose Obamacare. As in the rest of the nation, opinion was divided.  At least we can all agree on the excellence of sunsets. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Choosing a Trail Running Shoe

Thinking of taking up trail running? The most important piece of equipment is, of course, your shoes.

Drew Haas, an avid trail runner and manager at the Mountaineer in Keene Valley, went over some options with us for the July/August issue of the Adirondack Explorer — with this caveat: “What works for one doesn’t necessarily work for the next.”

In general, trail-running shoes are more durable and more protective than street-running shoes. Trail shoes should have a protective plate in the forefoot so you don’t feel every rock you land on. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 28, 2017

16 Adirondack Hiking Challenges: A Bucket List

Since Bob and George Marshall and their guide, Herb Clark, climbed all forty-six of the High Peaks in the 1920s, more than ten thousand hikers have followed in their footsteps.

You can read more about some of the hiking challenges easing pressure on the High Peaks in the latest issue of the Adirondack ExplorerSubscribe here or download the app.

Here is a list of other hiking challenges in the Adirondack Park. Most have websites or Facebook pages that can be found by googling their names. Unless otherwise indicated, finishers qualify for a patch: » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 28, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, July 28, 2017

Asian Longhorned Beetle Outreach and Survey Underway

On the lookout for hungry bugsThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that the annual Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) Swimming Pool Survey is underway, marking the program’s sixth summer of research work.

DEC invites pool owners, now through August 30, to check their pool filters and help keep watch for these invasive beetles before they cause serious damage to the State’s forests and street trees. DEC and partners will also be hanging tags on host trees to encourage people to learn more about ALB and to demonstrate the potential impacts in neighborhoods and parks. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 28, 2017

ROOST Hires Lake Placid-Whiteface Marketing Manager

Catherine Ericson The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has announced the addition of Catherine Ericson as the Lake Placid and Whiteface Regional Marketing Manager.

Ericson has been on the job a few weeks and is serving as a liaison between community stakeholders, travelers, and ROOST, and supports and coordinates destination marketing strategies for the two regions. She oversees the destination websites, LakePlacid.com and WhitefaceRegion.com, and is responsible for the regions’ social media marketing.  » Continue Reading.


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