Tuesday, April 4, 2017

CATS 2017 Grand Hike Planned For May 13th

grand hikeChamplain Area Trails (CATS) is hosting the North Country’s fourth “Inn-to-Inn” hike on Saturday, May 13th. The 11-mile “Grand Hike to the Essex Inn” will be on CATS hiking trails and scenic back roads from Wadhams to the Essex Inn where there will be a “block party.” The celebration features the Zip City Blues Band, restorative yoga and chair massage provided by Lake Champlain Yoga & Wellness, kids crafts, a photo booth, and a buffet dinner. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 3, 2017

Steven Engelhart: Making of a Preservationist

Steven Engelhart group

I grew up in Plattsburgh, which I think makes me a local. My father was a professor at SUNY Plattsburgh and taught the literature of Emerson and Thoreau and other late 19th  century American writers.

When a PBS documentary was made in the 1990s about the creation of the Adirondack Park, he was interviewed about Emerson and his outing to the Philosopher’s Camp in 1858. Like Emerson, he had a deep appreciation for nature, which we all inherited, but I can’t say that this translated into wilderness adventuring as a family. This I would discover later on my own. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 3, 2017

Lake Placid Reel Paddling Film Fest Thursday

Dave and Amy Freeman in Minnesota’s Boundary Waters for the film, “Bear Witness” The Reel Paddling Film Festival will stop at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on Thursday, April 6, for an evening of adventure films. The annual event is hosted by the Northern Forest Canoe Trail and Adirondack Lakes and Trails.

This year’s festival features several great films, including “Bear Witness,” the story of Dave and Amy Freeman’s spending a year in the wilderness of Minnesota’s Boundary Waters; “The Canoe,” a reflection of what the Canadian canoe culture looks like today; and “Noatak: Return to the Arctic,” the two story of two adventurers returning to the Noatak River in Alaska’s wild and spectacular Brooks Range. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 3, 2017

Piano By Nature Hosts Gregory Douglass Concerts

Gregory Douglass On Friday, April 7th and Saturday, April 8th at 7 pm, Piano By Nature in Elizabethtown will host Vermont Singer-Songwriter Gregory Douglass in two concerts.

These concerts are a foray into new territory for a concert series that for nine years has been primarily classical and jazz-based. Gregory Douglass is an internationally renowned independent musician with eight critically acclaimed albums. Douglass has sold over 75,000 songs digitally on his own and his videos have amounted to over 600,000 views on Youtube alone. His music videos have charted numerous times on MTV Network’s LOGO TV. Douglass was a finalist in the 2011 Mountain Stage NewSong Competition and won Yobi.tv’s “New Stage” competition, an original web series starring Jersey Shore’s Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 2, 2017

Experience Matters: Women Building Trails

Dove Henry with trail crew members, building a bridgeMarcy Dam was my first tool pack-in, back in the summer of 2012. I was fresh out of finals week, the airless world of fluorescent screens and dim libraries, and wholly intoxicated by the smell of balsam fir, the sun glinting off Heart Lake, the entire summer before me. It was late May, but the morning was already warm.

Outside the Wiezel Trails Cabin, my fellow first-years and I practiced tying-on — the artful process of lashing a share of gear and tools to one’s pack-frame with parachute cord. I situated a box full of cans of tuna and pineapple on my frame’s shelf and pulled the cord tight across the cardboard, securing it with a clumsy half-hitch. Holding the frame steady with my knee, I looked at the massive pile of tools beside me and tried to envision how they could all fit onto this small rectangle of metal, which would then, somehow, be strapped to my body. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 2, 2017

Cooper’s Cave: America’s First Roadside Attraction

19th century tourists visiting Cooper’s CaveJames Fenimore Cooper’s knowledge of the French and Indian War may have been sketchy, but he was interested enough in its history to contemplate a visit to Lake George, which he finally did with a party of Englishmen in August, 1824.

Lord Edward Stanley,  who would later become the 14th Earl of Derby and  Great Britain’s Prime Minister during the reign of Queen Victoria, was a member of the party. As they crossed the Hudson River at Glens Falls on the return trip to Saratoga, Stanley noted in his journal, “Cooper… was much struck with the scenery which he had not before seen; and exclaimed, ‘I must place one of my old Indians here.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Tim Rowland’s Project Farmhouse

tim rowlands project farmhouseThe preachers have never had much luck getting their tenterhooks into me because I’m not all that enamored with the idea of everlasting life. Everlasting life is like Moose Tracks ice cream: After the first bite you never want it to end, but by the time you pack away a quart and a half you start to see a down side.

And everlasting life is about the only arrow the preachers have in their quiver. They never say, “If you lead a wholesome, righteous existence you will have everlasting life — plus you get to date Emma Stone.”

Still, it has to be acknowledged that Ponce de Leon wasn’t the only fan of perpetual youth, and when I was younger I confess to feeling the same way, largely due to a curiosity of what will happen next—tomorrow, and 2,000 years from tomorrow. I have, however, discovered that it is a simple task to live well beyond the average, 78.2-year lifespan. It is no great effort to live for a hundred, five hundred or even a thousand years. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Judith Enck On EPA, Trump, and #MarchforScience

I miss Richard Nixon. I really do. Nixon established the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) forty-six years ago. Since then, the EPA has been at the forefront of issues that have improved the environment and public health. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Adirondack Park.

Remember acid rain? In the early 1970s, air pollution from fossil-fuel plants had made rain and snow so acidic it killed wildlife in hundreds of Adirondack lakes and streams. Ironically, the water looked crystal clear, but the pH balance could not sustain healthy fish and plant populations.

EPA came to the rescue. » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 31, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, March 31, 2017

Owl Prowl at Lake George on Saturday

Our family always enjoys the opportunity for a night hike, snowshoe or ski. Being able to unwind at the end of the day helps us focus on our other senses, to listen to nature, and reconnect. One favorite way to unwind is calling in the owls. That activity wasn’t something that just showed up on our radar. It began with a local Owl Prowl and it has become part of an evening routine.

According to Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) Land Stewart Alex Novack, the LGLC’s April 1st Owl Prowl is a perfect opportunity to learn more about these nocturnal animals. The location for the free night-time hike was chosen because of the potential for interactions with owls. » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 31, 2017

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Some Local Media Was Reluctant to Support Women’s Rights

North Country newspapers, the only media during the 1800s, were slow to come around and at times downright resistant to women’s rights. Their job was to report the news, but in order to maintain readership, they also had to cater to their customers — like the old adage says, “give ’em what they want.”  That atmosphere made it difficult for new and progressive ideas, like women’s rights, to make headway.

The push for women’s rights exposed many inequities early on, but it was difficult to establish a foothold among other important stories of the day. The powerful anti-slavery movement of the 1800s presented an opportunity, for although women and slaves were at opposite ends of the spectrum in the popular imagination — women on a pedestal and slaves treated terribly — they sought many of te same goals: freedom to speak out on their own behalf, the right to vote, and equal pay for equal work. Women passionate about those subjects joined anti-slavery organizations to seek freedom and equal rights for all, regardless of race or sex. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Winter Storm Expected: Outdoor Adirondack Conditions (Mar 30)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is published each Thursday afternoon and can be heard Friday mornings on WSLP Lake Placid, and the stations of North Country Public Radio.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Send observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 30, 2017

New Rules For Adirondack Fishing Going Into Effect

Fly Fishing on the Ausable River - photo by John WarrenNew fishing regulations go into effect on April 1, the start of the trout season statewide.

Numerous changes will impact Adirondack waters and anglers.

The new regulations include the elimination of special brook trout regulations at Whey Pond in the Saranac Lake Wild Forest. The pond neighbors the Rollins Pond and Fish Creek camping areas. Previous regulations had required anglers to release brook trout under 12 inches and to only allow them to keep three during an outing. Anglers were also required to use artificial lures.

The restrictive regulations were in place to protect brood stock for the Windfall strain of heritage brook trout. Whey Pond had been reclaimed in 1989 for the purpose of eliminating invasive fish, but two invasive fish species living in the pond have hurt the brook trout population there. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 30, 2017

LGLC Protects Wing Pond, Land in Fort Ann

Wing Pond in AutumnThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) recently purchased a 159-acre property in Bolton that includes Wing Pond, and received a donation of 15 acres in the Town of Fort Ann.

The Wing Pond property includes 750 feet of a tributary that flows into Northwest Bay, and about 15 acres of wooded and open wetlands, including Wing Pond itself. The land also offers nice views of Lake George and the potential to create recreational trails connecting to the adjoining Pole Hill Pond parcel of NYS Forest Preserve. The LGLC expects to transfer the property to New York State. » Continue Reading.


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