Saturday, June 10, 2017

Eating Seasonally, Locally in the Adirondacks

Adirondack Farm Produce - Photo by Shannon HoulihanWe’re living in an age of global markets, with almost all of us buying our food from chain supermarkets, convenient stores, and fast food outlets; rarely thinking about where our food comes from or how it was grown or processed.

More often than not, the food we eat is grown on large industrial farms, before being shipped across the country, or from central or South America or overseas, to huge distribution centers, where it’s sorted, packaged, and processed before it’s trucked to retailers. This means that a remarkable diversity of food is available all year round, for consumers who can to afford to buy it. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 9, 2017

Owls Head Trail Being Closed By Land Owner

Owls Head Trail Map courtesy Adirondack AtlasThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that the trail to the summit of Owls Head in the town of Keene is closed to public access and use on weekends, effective immediately. The trailhead and all but the last 0.1 mile of the trail are located on private lands.

According to an announcement by DEC: “The large number of vehicles parked on the private road during the Memorial Day weekend blocked access for private landowners, and now the landowners are prohibiting the public to park on the private road between 4 p.m. Friday and 7 a.m. Monday and have posted signs along the road reflecting this decision.” » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 9, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, June 9, 2017

Adirondack Efforts To Fight Aquatic Invasives Expand

Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that New York State is expanding its partnership with Paul Smith College’s Adirondack Watershed Institute Stewardship Program to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) throughout the Adirondack’s waterways through the strategic placement of boat stewards and decontamination stations.

With more than 2,300 lakes and ponds, 1,500 miles of rivers, and 30,000 miles of brooks and streams, the Adirondack region is particularly vulnerable to the introduction of AIS. Once established, AIS such as zebra mussels and Eurasian water milfoil can spread rapidly through connecting waterways or by “hitchhiking” on the propellers, trailers, rudders, and motors of recreational boaters’ and anglers’ vessels. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 9, 2017

Invasive Species Trainings in the Adirondacks

AIS-training: Volunteers are shown how to complete survey data sheets to contribute to a region-wide lake monitoring program led by APIPP's Aquatic Invasive Species Program Coordinator Erin Vennie-VollrathThe Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is offering a series of free training sessions to help protect Adirondack woods and waters from the harmful impacts of invasive species this summer. These workshops are open to the public.

Participants can learn to identify, survey for and manage invasive species currently threatening the Adirondack region, such as Japanese knotweed and Eurasian watermilfoil, as well as those that pose significant risk to the region, but have not yet arrived, such as hydrilla and mile-a-minute weed. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 9, 2017

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Don’t Be Fooled: Big Brook Is Not Flatwater

I took this photo of Big Brook early Friday evening while driving between Tupper Lake and Long Lake on Route 30. If you’ve driven that highway, you’ve probably admired this scene. And if you’re a canoeist, you’ve probably wondered if the brook can be paddled. It certainly looks inviting.

Several years ago, I succumbed to curiosity. At the time, I was researching my guidebook Adirondack Paddling: 60 Great Flatwater Adventures. I thought Big Brook might make the cut. It turned out to be a dumb idea.

Continue reading at Adirondack Explorer.


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Mud, High Waters: Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (June 8)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Send observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Farmers’ Market Returns To Saranac Lake

saranac lake farmers marketThe Saranac Lake Farmers’ Market has opened its 2017 season. The market, which takes place at Riverside Park in downtown Saranac Lake, operates on Saturdays from 9 am to 2 pm. The market is a rain or shine event and continues through mid-October.

Farmers and producers will bring vegetables, fruits, meats, eggs, cheeses, arts, wines, spirits, baked goods and more.

The market will also be expanding the number of local musicians who will be playing at the market thanks to a donation from the Adirondack Green Circle. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Film Forum Brings Cultural Themes to Programs

The 16th Lake Placid Film Forum takes place this week, bringing a blend of international films, screenings, workshops, and master class programs to the Olympic village. According to the Adirondack Film Society’s Operations Manager Fred Balzac, the June 7-11, 2017 event will kick off with a thank you to Lake Placid.

“We are presenting a free screening of the film ‘Eddie the Eagle’ on Wednesday,” says Balzac. “Eddie trained in Lake Placid and we want to celebrate the town’s Olympic roots. We have Larry Stone, a ski jumping coach, as a special guest. This free screening is supported by the town and village of Lake Placid.”

Around the year 2000, The Lake Placid Film Forum went through a restructuring phase with the loss of corporate funding and the nature of the economy. The organizing committee revamped the event into a monthly film series. Due to popular demand, the Film Forum was added back into the schedule and has been growing ever since. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Piseco Protect Your Lake Seminar Friday

protect your lake seminarOn Friday June 9, 2017 from 9:30 am to 12:30 pm at the Piseco Common School, Adirondack Lakes Alliance and the Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District will sponsor a Protect Your Lake Seminar.

The Protect Your Lake Seminar is packed with presenters who will teach the public how to prioritize and plan for water quality concerns, what goes into developing a Lake Management Plan, and funding resources. A resource fair will round out the event. Refreshments will be served. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Captain Lewis: Horace Brown’s Great Brown Horse

Horace Brown, perhaps the greatest horse trainer from the northern Adirondacks and foothills, attained fame and many trotting victories in America, Europe, and Russia. Of all his successes, none was more acclaimed than the marvelous season of 1882. Collectively, it was among the unlikeliest stories in sports, an early equivalent of the US hockey team’s stunning Olympic victory in 1980, when a group of fresh, largely untested amateurs came together and conquered the world’s best.

The 1882 story became legend and was often repeated, but the first couple of names involved aren’t absolutely certain. Bear with me briefly through the details, for the story will get better. By most accounts, the horse in question was bred by Jeff Brown of Dresden, on the western shore of Seneca Lake in the Finger Lakes region of New York. In the vicinity of Dresden, he sold it to Richard Brown (and now the names are certain,) who sold it to Lawrence Bogert, who sold it to Stewart L. Purdy of the town of Benton. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Hotel Saranac Listed Among Historic Hotels of America

The Hotel Saranac, which first opened its doors in 1927, has been recognized by the Historic Hotels of America, an official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. It is one of 295 hotels listed.

In order to be recognized by Historic Hotels of America, a hotel must be more than 50 years old and have “faithfully maintained their authenticity, sense of place, and architectural integrity.” The hotel is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

‘Ride for the River’ Bike Tour Supports Ausable River

Annual Bike Tour of Ausable RiverEvent registration is now open for the Ausable River Association ‘s 6th Annual Ride for the River, which will take place on Sunday, July 16, 2017.  The family-friendly event is a fully supported road cycling tour featuring three distance options, all showcasing the Ausable River watershed.

The Ausable River Association (AsRa) created Ride for the River in 2012 to celebrate the resilience of local communities following the flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene.

In partnership with Cycle Adirondacks, the 2017 ride will feature opportunities for cyclists to learn about the impacts of road salt, invasive species and undersized culverts on Ausable streams and habitat.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Advisory Meeting for Adirondack Trails and Lodging System

Trails and Lodging System Community WorkshopThe Adirondack Community-based Trails and Lodging System (ACTLS) has scheduled a Project Advisory Committee meeting for June 13 at 10 am. The ACTLS is developing a conceptual plan for potential trail networks and key locations for potential lodging facilities within the Adirondack Park.

The Project Advisory Committee is made up of a variety of local government, nonprofit, economic development, recreation, and other stakeholders. The committee is expected to oversee the project and provide input on local and regional issues. The public is welcome to attend.

Topics for discussion include a project update, review of the community workshops held last fall, updates on the project and the identification of priorities.

» Continue Reading.


Page 5 of 618« First...34567...102030...Last »