Saturday, May 6, 2017

Commentary: Constitutional Convention Will Protect Forest Preserve

Article 14, Section 1 New York State Constitution Forever Wild clauseWhat follows is the first of three essays about the vote coming this November on whether New York State will hold a Constitutional Convention.  This first commentary in support is by Christopher Bopst and Peter Galie. Part two of Bopst and Galie’s essay will run Sunday morning, followed by an essay opposing a convention by Adirondack historian Philip Terrie on Sunday afternoon.

On November 7, 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether they want to convene the state’s tenth constitutional convention, to consider amendments and revisions to the state’s 120-year old constitution. The question, which is automatically placed on the ballot every 20 years (N.Y. Const., art. XIX, sec. 2), causes considerable angst among those concerned a convention may jeopardize protections currently enshrined in the constitution, such as the beloved forever wild provision. The first part of this article will provide a brief history of the forever wild provision, and in particular how this provision has been treated at state constitutional conventions. The second part of the article will discuss how and why the provision has remained over one hundred years after its adoption a viable and vital part of our constitutional tradition while other constitutional prohibitions have not. The viability and vitality of the provision augur well for the likelihood that it will retain its significance should a convention be called in 2017. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 6, 2017

The Captain Marvel of Port Henry

tom tyler as captain marvelOn August 9, 1903, Helen and Frank Markowski had a baby boy in Port Henry they named Vincent. Like many fathers and brothers in the area, Frank and Frank Junior, Vincent’s older brother worked in the mines for the Witherbee Sherman Company.

Around 1924 at the age of 21, Vincent moved to California and changed his name to Tom Tyler. He found work in the film industry as a prop man and an extra. His appearances as an extra lead to his first starring role in “Let’s Go Gallagher” (1925). Tom became the King of B-Westerns during the silent era and into the talkies of the 1930’s. Over his entire career, he acted in more than 180 movies and TV shows from 1924 to 1953. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 5, 2017

Rulf’s Orchard 65th Anniversary Celebration

What started as a small dairy farm in 1952 with 12-acres of apple trees has now grown to be an farmstand destination in Peru, NY. Over the past 65 years, Rulf’s Orchard has expanded from its modest roots to include seasonal vegetables, Pick-U-Own Blueberries and Strawberries, a corn maze, year-round bakery, and a pumpkin patch. It’s the fresh apples and cider that always have my family coming back. This Saturday, the staff and owners of Rulf’s are throwing their own anniversary party to commemorate their 65th anniversary.

According to Rulf’s Office Manager Amanda Whisher, they are finally able to show off their new building and showcase the greenhouses. Though the new addition was completed in September, the staff at Rulf’s wanted to wait until spring to celebrate their latest transition. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 5, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, May 5, 2017

Hudson Riverkeeper Sweep Extends to North Creek Saturday

riverkeeper sweepA one-day event, the 6th Annual Riverkeeper Sweep will stretch from Brooklyn to the Adirondacks and will bring out more than 100 teams of volunteers – about 2,200 people in all – to clean up and restore the Hudson River Valley and New York City shorelines on Saturday, May 6.

A scout troop will be part of a cleanup at North Creek, a community on the Upper Hudson in Adirondack Park, where the 60th Annual Hudson River Whitewater Derby will be under way. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 5, 2017

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, May 4, 2017

A Short History of Wilbur’s Raquette Lake Hotel

The Forked Lake House built near the carry between Forked Lake and Raquette in about 1873.This is the story of how an unambitious, unsociable man who could barely support himself, much less his family, and had no experience whatsoever in running a hotel, came to build and run the first hotel on Raquette Lake. That such a person who, according to one of his relatives, “was neither suited to the country, nor the people” and “made enemies through the country” could be capable of this feat seems to defy all we know about other proprietors of pioneer hotels.

Wilber, the man who built the hotel, came into the Adirondacks from the West around 1855, a time when all the inhabitants of Raquette Lake could fit into a present-day family’s SUV. He named his establishment the Raquette Lake Hotel, but contemporaries called it Wilbur’s or Wilber’s. But very little was known about this pioneer hotel owner, why he came here, why he built the place. Even his proper name remained something of a mystery. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Cold Rain, Snow, Mud: Adirondack Conditions This Weekend (May 4)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled by Adirondack Almanack founder and editor John Warren for publication each Thursday afternoon. John’s condensed version for radio can be heard Friday mornings on WSLP Lake Placid, and the stations of North Country Public Radio.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Send observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Conference On The Adirondacks Set For May 24-25

The Adirondack Research Consortium has announced that Aaron Mair, the President, Sierra Club, is a keynote speaker at the 24th Annual Conference on the Adirondacks, May 24 and 25, at the Conference Center at Lake Placid. He will present his vision for a Veteran’s Memorial Trail from Fort Drum to the Adirondacks as well as other topics.

This day and a half event will also feature presentations on the Adirondack Atlas project, the NYS Clean Water Infrastructure Program, Gathering Places in the Adirondacks, and an Ecological Tools presentation by Jerry Jenkins of the Wildlife Conservation Society. Mark Lynch, President of NYSEG will discuss his company’s plans in the Adirondacks, and longtime Adirondack scientist Ray Curran will be presented with the 2017 Elizabeth Thorndike Adirondack Achievement Award. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Fort Ticonderoga Opens For Season May 6th

fort ticonderogaFort Ticonderoga will open for the 2017 season on Saturday, May 6. Fort Ticonderoga is a historic site, museum, and family destination which tells a new story each year through historical interpretation. This year is 1757, the year made famous by the novel Last of the Mohicans. Visitors will discover the real story of 1757 as they step into Fort Carillon (later named Ticonderoga) bustling with activity with French soldiers, native warriors, and cannon preparing to take the fight for New France all the way up Lake George to British-held territory. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Paul Hetzler: Keep Off the Grass

lawn careAs a kid of about five, I became suspicious of lawns. In a rare moment of TV viewing, I had seen a public-service ad wherein a bundle of green leafy stuff thudded into an eerily vacant playground while a baritone voice boomed out something like “Grass. We think it’s bad for kids. Stay away from it.” My mom insisted this was “bad grass” which did not grow in our yard. However, she declined to elaborate, which fueled my mistrust. So I kept off the lawn a while.

These days, “bread” is no longer money, “mint” is just a flavor, and the pernicious leafy stuff mostly goes by other names. There is only one grass, and it is almost time to cut it again. Jargon may change, but things like paying taxes and mowing lawns don’t seem to. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

John Brown Day Set For Saturday, May 6

john brown livesAaron Mair, president of the Sierra Club; immigrant-rights organization Migrant Justice; and Don and Vivian Papson, founders of the North Country Underground Railroad Historical Association, will receive Spirit of John Brown Freedom Awards at the John Brown Day celebration on Saturday, May 6, at 2 pm.

The annual event, which is organized by North Country-based human rights and freedom education project John Brown Lives!, will be held at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site in Lake Placid. The public is welcome. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

A New Stoddard Mini Exhibit at Chapman Museum

Travelers on the porch at the Halfway House, 1870. The Chapman Historical Museum has opened a new mini-exhibit of Seneca Ray Stoddard photographs. Featured are images of the stage coach trip that visitors in the 1870s experienced from the train station in Glens Falls to the Fort William Henry Hotel at the south end of Lake George. In addition to the Halfway House, highlights include the tollhouse in French Mountain, Bloody Pond, Col. Ephraim Williams’ monument, and the grounds of the hotel. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Adirondack Land Trust Awarded Grants to Expand Capacity

glenviewThe Adirondack Land Trust (ALT) has been awarded two New York State Conservation Partnership Program grants: $30,000 to increase its impact as a conservation organization, and $10,000 to begin care and management of Glenview Preserve in the town of Harrietstown.

The funding was announced as part of the Land Trust Alliance and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s 2017 round of NYS Conservation Partnership Program (NYSCPP) grants. Funded by the Environmental Protection Fund (EPF), 58 awards of $1.8 million will leverage an additional $1.5 million in private and local support for projects across the state that protect farmland, wildlife habitat, and water quality, and conserve open spaces that are important for community health, tourism and regional economies. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Steven Engelhart: Every Community Needs a Beating Heart

Old Forge Hardware CompanyThere is overwhelming evidence that the most successful communities — with thriving economies, healthy schools and social and cultural institutions — are those that embrace their own history and preserve their historic buildings. Good jobs, protection of natural resources, and good leadership are perhaps even more important. Historic preservation is a critical element in the revitalization of struggling communities and it is a visible expression of a community investing in itself and improving its own quality of life.

Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) has always been a strong advocate for the connection between historic preservation and community vitality. We work to preserve individual buildings, yes, but we also advocate for preservation because historic places can become affordable housing, attractive spaces for businesses, innovative cultural centers, new farms, restaurants and other attractions. Preservation is about finding new uses for historic structures, not just saving buildings. » Continue Reading.


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