Monday, August 8, 2005

Adirondack Pagan Pride On The March

The Almanack always assumed there must be at least some Pagans in our region – and not just these. But who knew that they’re throwing a party in Queensbury! Even for the deaf! With the support of local pagan businesses! Who knew they were organized! And had pictures!

We’ll be there, but first we have to stop by and ask one of our favorite nutcases and local substitute teacher, Roger “Evolution is a Lie” and “Condoms Don’t Stop AIDS!” Richards what he thinks about it. We’re sure he’ll think it’s cool too and want us to invite Lake Luzerne Crazy Councilpreacher Charlie Brown.


Saturday, August 6, 2005

Congratulations Natural History Museum

A hearty “good job” is in order for the Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks for securing another $5 million; by all reports progress is being made (audio), but the Almanack hopes they hurry, our natural world is going to be history before too long and the museum may be the only place left to get a glimpse.


Thursday, August 4, 2005

Ticonderoga Plane Crash: Murder-Suicide?

What do the band Phish, the regional airline Capital Airlines, a Connecticut scam artist, and Old Fort Mountain near Ticonderoga have in common?

Maybe a murder-suicide.

A year ago this month, an experienced pilot from Connecticut named Milton Marshall was flying his own twin-engine Piper Navajo chartered by 40-year-old Michael Keilty when the two crashed mysteriously into Old Fort Mountain just south of Ticonderoga cutting a “500 foot long swath through 60 foot [old growth] trees” (Press-Republican, Part I, Part II). Keilty said he was a pilot himself interested in becoming an investor in Marshall’s company.

Marshall had started his career as a professional pilot at the regional airline Capital Airlines in 1952. Capital became a part of United Airlines in 1961 but when Marshall retired in the 1980s he started a new Capital Airlines, a Federal Aviation Regulations Part 135 On-Demand Air Carrier (certificate number VRWA687I). “Quite a bit smaller in size, but not at heart,” the company’s website read.

Now, Marshall’s daughter Kathy Leonzi thinks the crash was no accident.

And oh yeah… Phish… who could forget the 1996 party they threw at the abandoned Plattsburgh Air Force Base in honor of the founder of the original Capital Airlines – Clifford Ball – and what a party it was (audio of the shows and photos) – it was the first of the annual Phish summer festivals and made Plattsburgh (temporarily) the ninth largest city in New York State.


Suggested Reading

Airports: A Century of Architecture


Wednesday, August 3, 2005

See Alice Run. Hear Alice Run. Esmond Who?

In case you missed it, Adirondack native and Green Party Albany mayoral candidate Alice Green was featured on WAMC. At the same time, the Glens Falls Post Star is hosting a “debate” with only the most conservative TWO of the FOUR people who are running for Mayor of Glens Falls (get it while you can since it looks like that’s the only place you’ll find it). I’ll bet Metroland wants to take that “Best of 2005” award back now. I know independent candidate Esmond Lyons wishes they would – he’s had what amounts to no coverage from the folks at the ComPost Star.

UPDATE: Matt reports by e-mail that:

Since May 1st , the number of stories in the Post-Star per candidate is as follows;

Bud Taylor 68
Pete McDevitt 39
Esmond Lyons 22
William Berg 20
Leroy Akins 20
This is the number of stories published since May 1st in which the candidate in question is mentioned (not to be confused withe being written about or covered). It should be noted that the Democrat and the two independents running are mentioned less than a third as often as Bud Taylor and half as often as his SAME-PARTY “opponent”. The truth, in total, is that most stories that mention Bud or Peter are actually ABOUT them, primarily. The mention of the the other three candidates is usually just a casual mention that they’re running as a tag line tacked on to the end of the story. They are denied voice and are often neither quoted nor consulted.

Amazing.

UPDATE AGAIN: baloghblog has endorsed Independent and Green minded Jacob Roberts for Mayor of Syracuse. Who says there aren’t choices? Now if we could only get the local media to recognize them.


Tuesday, August 2, 2005

Abandoned Adirondack Veterans: Loring Peck

A reader of our recent post on forgotton veterans remembered:

hiking to the grave of “Colonel Peck” in Speculator when I was a child. My grandfather used to bring us up there, but it seemed as if he was the only person who knew about it. There may have been a roadside marker at the trailhead, but I don’t remember anything else that really commemorated Col. Peck’s service. If I recall correctly, he was a hero of the Revolution.

That he was. According to field notes made by Melvin W. Lethbridge and printed in the New York State Historical Association’s quarterly journal in 1926:

On the shore of Lake Pleasant, which is the head of one branch of the Sacandaga River, and about one and one-half miles in on a trail which leaves the mountain road to the lake at Signboard Hill, and bears to the left around the head of the lake, at the foot of Speculator Mountain, in a family cemetery lies the body of a Revolutionary soldier together with his wife and son. This man settled here shortly after the Revolutionary War and hewed a farm out of the wilderness and now rests peacefully there. His name was Colonel Loring Peck, and the place is yet known as “Pecks Clearing.” It is now the property of the State and is overgrown with woods. It should be cleared and preserved by the State.

Peck was born in 1744 and according to History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence plantations (1859-60, over at Making of America) Loring Peck was made a Captain in Colonel Henry Babcock’s Second Rhode Island Regiment (Babcock was replaced by Colonel Christopher Lippitt a month later). This “Second Rhode Island” was actually made of men of the State Militia who were eventually turned over to the Continential Congress. The Regiment “played an important role” at the Battle of Trenton and the Battle of Princeton according to the Rhode Island Historical Society which holds many of the regiment and Lippitt’s papers.

After his service in the Second Rhode Island Loring Peck was at Bristol, Rhode Island in 1777 and 1790 and was living in Amenia, Dutchess County NY in 1800 and 1810 and moved to Lake Pleasant before 1820. He had three sons who served in the War of 1812:

  • Dr. George Peck who married Elizabeth Dunning served as a surgeon in the War of 1812. He was a land speculator and founder of Camanche, the first county seat of Clinton County, Indiana, in the 1830s.
  • Richard Peck served in the War of 1812 with some other men from Wells and Lake Pleasant.
  • William Burke Peck was a Captain in the War of 1812 on the Canadian Frontier with some other men from Wells and Lake Pleasant. According to local historians he opened the first store at lake Pleasant in 1817.

Loring Peck was living with his son Loring Jr. in Lake Pleasant 1830, at the reported age of 80 to 90. His gravestone says “In Memory of Col. Loring Peck, a Patriot of the Revolution. Died July 29, 1833 in the 90th year of his age.” In 1935 a small bronze plaque was placed at the back of his gravestone by Minnie Peck Hall Krauser a member of the (Denver, Colorado) Regent Peace Pipe Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

It would be interesting to know how he got the sobriquet “Colonel.” If anyone has any additional info on Peck or other abondoned veterans – let the Almanack know.

Photos courtesy Elizabeth Emery, Gloversville, NY. Visit her online at http://www.visitsacandaga.com/


Saturday, July 30, 2005

Dark Skies: Gone Forever?

Dark Skies are increasingly under threat in the Adirondacks, and unfortunately the organization Dark Skies for the Adirondacks has apparently already passed. It’s true – we can’t go back again, even if we’d like to.


Thursday, July 28, 2005

Adirondack Regional Airlines

The Tops Supermarket news got us thinking about other local corporate rip-offs, pull-outs and victims and that got us to regional airlines.

Robert E. Peach, a World War II Navy bomber pilot who won two Distinguished Flying Crosses, started with Robinson Airlines (out of Ithaca Municipal Airport and later the Oneida County Airport) when they had only three planes in 1945.

Robinson Airlines became Mohawk Airlines [old plane photos] and Peach was the driving force behind Mohawk’s expansion, he served as president and later the board chair.

Mohawk was purchased by Washington DC based Allegheny Airlines in 1970 and Peach shot himself in Clinton NY the following year.

In 1975 Allegheny pulled its Adirondack regional operations out and “refocused” on the Alleghenies (e.g. Pittsburgh).

Allegheny became a part of US Airways Group in the 1980s.

In 1978 Paul Quackenbush founded Empire Airlines, which filled the Allegheny void and grew to over 24 departures a day in 1987 when they were purchased by Piedmont Airlines which also became a part of US Airways Group which relocated the regional reservations and maintenance facilities.

Can anyone report on the status of regional airlines today?


Thursday, July 28, 2005

More Mad Cow Madness

Thanks to Friends of Rural New York for pointing us to the latest round-up on that whole crazy cow thing – here’s hoping NCPR will take another look. Especially in light of another discovery.


Wednesday, July 27, 2005

Fellowship and Followship

The Almanack realizes that some places in our region are languishing in rural poverty. But a story about a New Hampshire church group launching a mission to help Pottersville is just plain strange – but hey, they “definitely needed their help.” Even if they sit less than 200 yards from Word of Life Fellowship on Schroon Lake whose recent speakers (to thousands of fans) have included such fantastic representations of followship as guns and drugs runner Ollie North.

The Word of Life Standard of Conduct

Certain principles of conduct are a necessary part of the effort to establish an atmosphere within which the goals of Word of Life can be realized. For this reason, Word of Life requires associates of the organization to refrain from the possession or use of alcoholic beverages, tobacco, illicit drugs, from gambling and the use of traditional playing cards, from the participation in oath-bound secret organizations (societies), from social dancing of any type, from attendance at the motion picture theater, and commercial stage productions. Christian discretion and restraint will be exercised in all choices of entertainment, including radio, television, audio and visual recordings, and various forms of literature. Also, Christian discretion will be exercised in observance of the Lord’s day. Furthermore, it is expected that associates will actively support a local Bible-believing church through service, giving, and allegiance.

So much for that last line.

By The Way:

In New York City more than one-fifth of people (recent estimates put it at one-quarter) live under the poverty line. If the poor of NYC they were their own city (of about 1.7 million), they would be the fifth largest city in America [pdf].

Warren County is one of the fastest growing counties in New York – it’s ranked 11th in the state (out of 62). According to 2000 census data, the median household income in Warren County is $39,198. The national median household income in 2000 was $41,994. Warren County’s per capita income is about $28,020 (in 2002, an increase of 19.4% from 1997).

In Mexico – “a free market economy that recently entered the trillion dollar class” according to the CIA factbook – 40% of the population lives under the poverty line (that’s Mexico’s poverty line!).


Monday, July 25, 2005

Big Box Tops and Adirondack Blight

In the Adirondacks, Tops Supermarkets are ubiquitous to say the least. Many communities depend on Tops as the only supermarket of any size in town. Much of the fresh produce brought into the region is sold in Tops – in a number of places – North Creek, Schroon Lake, Chestertown, Indian Lake and others – the local Tops is the only game in town. Most had been Grand Unions until they were purchased in 2001. Some are still run-down and most offer a limited selection of fresh meat, fish and produce so it doesn’t bode well for a whole lot of us that Ahold, the multinational corporation that now owns Tops has abandoned it for greener pastures.

Tops is just a trade name, the real name of the company was the Niagara Frontier Services, begun in 1960 by Savino Nanula, Armand Castellani (the owner of Great Bear Market) and Thomas Buscaglia (a grocery equipment salesman) near Buffalo / Niagara (the later two are now dead). Tops along with it’s subsidy Sugercreek / Wilson Farms convenience stores were purchased by Ahold in 1991 in their bid to control America’s groceries [pdf].

Ahold just sold Sugercreek / Wilson Farms to “WFI Acquisition, Inc.,” – a corporate shield for Savino Nanula’s “The Nanula Group,” which is actually a corporation formed by Nanco Enterprises, Inc. and the New York City investment firm Bruckmann, Rosser, Sherrill & Co. Bruckmann, Rosser, Sherrill & Co is a coporation formed by former senior executives of Citicorp Venture Capital (who doesn’t even have a website they care so little about who knows about them) and, well, they are, you know.

But who knows what Nanco Enterprises is, though we do suspect the “Nan” in “Nanco” and the “Nan” in “Nanula” are one in the same – another shield from personal responsibility for what your corporate identity does, it wouldn’t surprise us it if was some kind of tax shelter as well.

Anyway… the question is, will Nanula and his good ole boys buy back the Tops in our midst now that Ahold has had its way with them? Or will they simply go the way many Grand Unions have – to abandoned blight. Its just another reason that the Big Box sucks… imagine what our towns and villages would have looked like had these “Super” Markets not replaced the locally owned corner grocery.

A great opportunity to mention that local baker Matt Funiciello, owner of Rock Hill Bakehouse, is hosting James Kunstler on Tuesday, August9th.


Friday, July 22, 2005

The Flag or Egret Question

Stopped into the local Post Office to pick up a new roll of stamps. “Would you like flags or egrets?” the postmaster asked. The Almanack is fine with egrets or flags (they’re only stamps after all), but the question struck us as funny… was the postmaster checking our loyalty?

“At least you have a choice now,” he says, noting that until recently they only carried flags. We scanned the lobby wondering if someone was watching by video – and decided they probably weren’t – then noted that probably, flag stamps didn’t exist before the Civil War, and they couldn’t have been offering no stamps before that so…

It turns out the first flag stamp was apparently issued in 1869. Big brother discovered the power of “The Flag or Egret Question” somewhat later.


Thursday, July 21, 2005

Hey Cool…

The Association for the Protection of the Adirondacks, the people who brought us the Listing of Oldest and Rarest [Adirondack] Books has updated its Adirondack Chronology [pdf]. It’s an amazing bit of community history in its purest form.

Who knew that it was just .65 billion years ago that the Iapetus opened in the Adirondacks with much North-Northeast rifting and jointing and formation of diabase dikes… next time we’re at the Mt. Colden Trap Dike, we’ll really have something to think about.


Wednesday, July 20, 2005

Where There’s Smoke, There’s Not Always Fire

Michael Virtanen, our Associated Press writer, is reporting from Wanakena that the 1995 blowdown that toppled nearly a million acres of forest, nearly half in the Five Ponds Wilderness alone, is recovering in extraordinary ways. And look mom… despite all the lies and hype from Carol W. LaGrasse and the rest of the right-wingnuts, the wilderness did not go up in smoke. The same folks who are (at least partially) responsible for the ignorance of a few leaders against the conservation easements on International Paper lands [pdf] in the North. Which, by the way, is now under threat as IP “reorganizes” or “moves to China” – however you would rather pronounce it.

By the way, Virtanen’s latest is a piece on Adirondack guides.


Tuesday, July 19, 2005

Remembering Veterans

There’s always plenty of loud-mouths who demand respect for veterans. The question is, where are they when something actually needs to be done to show respect for people who have served American causes. Certainly not in Schuyler Falls where the grave of a veteran from one of America’s most important wars, the American Revolution, was recently [re]discovered. How long before the graves of Korean, Vietnam, Gulf and Iraq War veterans are forgotten – apparently not too long if a recent [re]discovery of a graveyard abandoned in the 1880s in Rutland County VT is any indicator.

A question for readers: From what other wars are their abandoned memorials in the region?

The grave of Ephraim Williams (who died at 42 at the Battle of Lake George on September 8, 1755) was only recently resurrected by a group of Williams College students. Williams left money in his will – made out just before he left for battle – to Williamstown for the establishment of a school, now Williams College.


Monday, July 18, 2005

Local Blogger Round-Up

Local blogs are proliferating. We’ve often cheered the writings of the Fairly Young Contrarian, whose recent rant against WAMC echoes our own feelings that Northeast Public Radio has gone too far – it’s time we had our own station that’s a little more local than Albany, or even Canton, for that matter.

A (rightfully) angry Jim Kunstler is back this week with another installment of Clusterfuck Nation “the industrial nations of the world will soon be competing desperately, perhaps even fighting over, the world’s remaining oil, while all our economies contract remorselessly” – whew… if only WAMC or NCPR would start seriously talking about that, and the implications for our region.

The Southern Adirondack DFA is busy missing the point (number 4) and encouraging us all to bypass Wal-Mart, not for local business, but for Costco… sure trade one super-national big box sprawl store for one that supports the perpetually losing corporate party DFA favors.

NYCO’s blog is Playing Chicken… something the DFA should think about when it supports corporations over people.

It’s certainly something Newsbreakers have been fired up over lately, even as their new blog calls it like it is.

And thanks to local bloggers Bethquick, CNY Ecoblog, and NYCO, who have (without us even asking!) added links to ADK Almanack… thanks folks


Page 588 of 590« First...102030...586587588589590