Posts Tagged ‘Bolton Landing’

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

View of Lake George from Huddle Bay

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Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Annual Dome Island Winter Ice Expedition

Dome Island in Winter LGLC Annual Expeditin 2011Though the recent fluctuation in temperature has not been conducive to cross-country skiing, it has allowed my family to explore some frozen Adirondack lakes and ponds.

Being able to access those frozen waterways during the winter is one of my family’s greatest joys. When the ponds are safe to cross, the ability to reach normally inaccessible shorelines opens up a different avenue for exploration. » Continue Reading.



Monday, October 7, 2013

Lake George Historic Preservation Projects Recognized

Silver bay (Lake George Mirror Photo)A downtown commercial building, a YMCA conference center and a private home, all on or near Lake George, all received awards from Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) when the organization held its annual luncheon in Lake Clear on September 30.

Jim Major’s restored Heustis block in Ticonderoga, the Silver Bay YMCA and the Bixby family’s house in Bolton Landing were among the six properties to receive awards this year, said Susan Arena, AARCH’s program director. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, September 18, 2013

International Observe the Moon Night in Bolton

International Observe the Moon Night in the AdirondacksMoon enthusiasts, stargazers, and anyone else interested in learning more about space will be interested in International Observe the Moon Night, sponsored by the Lake George Land Conservancy, and held at Up Yonda Farm Environmental Education Center in Bolton Landing, on Saturday, October 12 from 6 – 8 pm.

International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual event that is dedicated to encouraging people to ‘look up’ and take notice of our nearest neighbor, the Moon. From looking at the Moon with a naked eye to using the most sensitive telescope, every year on the same day, people from around the world hold events and activities that celebrate our Moon. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, September 17, 2013

In Bolton An Unparalleled Japanese Knotweed Infestation

23With aquatic invasive species attracting so much attention, it’s not surprising that terrestrial invasives have received comparatively little notice from Lake George residents.

But according to Bolton Landing resident Anne Green, “this town is ground zero for Japanese knotweed. Bolton has more dense beds per acre than any other town in the Adirondacks.”

Last year, Green began working with a program called the Regional Inlet Invasive Plant Program (RIIPP), which was started in Herkimer County in 2008, to combat Japanese Knotweed. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, September 5, 2013

Adirondack Legends Headed to Bolton Landing

LGM-ADK-LegendsThey’ll be spinning Adirondack legends in songs and stories, but they’re practically legends themselves. Chris Shaw, Dan Berggren, Bill Smith, and newcomer Alex Smith, will be in Bolton Landing for a free concert in Rogers Park on September 15. Adirondack Legends: a festival of new and traditional Adirondack music and stories, will be presented by the Lake George Mirror.

Adirondack Legends was organized by Chris Shaw, the Lake George native who has made a career of singing Adirondack folk songs and telling Adirondack tales. His repertoire includes some of the region’s earliest songs, and the revived interest in the Adirondack Songbook of Marjorie Lansing Porter is one inspiration for the show, he said. » Continue Reading.



Thursday, April 25, 2013

The Sembrich Announces 2013 Season

Sembrich buildingThe Sembrich, located at 4800 Lakeshore Drive in Bolton Landing, has announced its 2013 summer series of chamber music concerts and more, running from June 8 through September 5. This season’s theme is “Titans of Opera.”

“Although our summer series at The Sembrich has gained a reputation over the years as a destination for intimate chamber music concerts, this season we are taking on a grander theme,” says Artistic Director Richard Wargo. “We’re honoring opera composers Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner on the bicentennials of their births, and Benjamin Britten on the centennial of his. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, April 24, 2013

State Acquires Cat and Thomas Mountain Parcels

DSC00080New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens was atop Prospect Mountain this morning to announce the state’s purchase of more than 2,460 acres that will help protect the world-renowned scenery and water quality of Lake George and its tributaries.

The purchases, made through the Environmental Protection Fund, include the Cat and Thomas Mountains parcel, a 1,900-acre property in the town of Bolton (Warren County), previously acquired by the Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC), which was sold to the State for $1.5 million. The State also purchased the 565-acre East River Road Tract of the former Finch lands in the Town of Bolton from The Nature Conservancy for $381,000. This parcel is adjacent to the Cat and Thomas Mountains parcel. The parcels will be added to the State Forest Preserve. The State will pay full local property and school taxes on the newly acquired land. » Continue Reading.



Tuesday, February 26, 2013

A Lake George Park: Enlisting Women to the Cause

John Apperson Overlooking Lake George (Adirondack Research Library Photo)Although many books are available about the “great and gracious” on Millionaire’s Row at Lake George, few authors have written about the social and political drama that unfolded there, starting around 1920, as automobiles and improved roads began to change the status quo, revealing the tension between commercial interests and those who wished to create a Lake George Park.

Among those in favor of creating a park were several millionaires, including William K. Bixby, who donated land on Tongue Mountain to the state, and George Foster Peabody, who gave land for a campground (Hearthstone) and a park, on Prospect Mountain. Another wealthy landowner, Mrs. Stephen Loines, a widow with three unmarried daughters, contributed significantly to the cause, not only through her gifts of land, but in her efforts to influence public opinion. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Setting the Record Straight on Lake George:
Robert Moses, John Apperson, and Tongue Mountain

Christmas PhotographAccording to local lore, Robert Moses, secretary of the State Parks Commission, and John Apperson, leading defender of the “forever wild” clause of the NY constitution, had a confrontation of historic proportions, one summer day in August of 1923. Moses, who was already carrying out an ambitious scheme to grab power, had convinced Governor Al Smith that the development of state parks would be a very popular election issue.

As the center-piece of his plan, Moses wanted to build a parkway on the Tongue Mountain peninsula (plus, eventually, gas stations, scenic overlooks, and hotels). Apperson wanted to prevent development altogether.  He dreamed of bringing the central portion of the lake (Tongue Mountain, the Narrows, Black Mountain and Paradise Bay) under state ownership, and thus under the protection of the NY constitution.

The battle over the highway at Tongue Mountain happened quietly, behind the scenes, and out of the headlines.  In fact, Robert Moses’ biographer, Robert Caro, never mentioned this story, and apparently knew little about the work of John Apperson at Lake George.  Fortunately, we can now examine letters and documents long hidden from view that shed considerable light on the politics concerning the creation of a Lake George Park.
» Continue Reading.



Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Adirondack Family Activities: Amy’s Park in Bolton Landing

20121220_Amy-Park_019The Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) is hosting free guided hikes/snowshoes on their latest acquired property, Amy’s Park in Bolton Landing on January 26 and March 2.

LGLC’s Communications and Outreach Manager Sarah Hoffman says, “We officially opened Amy’s Park in July with a guided hike. It is a wonderful and rare property for this area. It is very family-friendly and a great place to explore with young kids.”

According to Hoffman though the 500-acre property does not have views of the lake, it is home to a beaver pond, natural plants, grasses and all the wildlife that comes with it. It is a beautiful addition to the other LGLC properties. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Lake George Stream Work Completed

This fall the Lake George Association (LGA) has been at work along waters that flow into Lake George, including Foster Brook in the hamlet of Huletts Landing, and English Brook in Lake George Village. The LGA also partnered with the Warren County Conservation District (WCSWCD), and the towns of Hague and Bolton to remove over 1300 cubic yards of material from eight sediment basins in the two towns, the equivalent of about 110 dump truck loads.

At Huletts, Foster Brook was severely eroded during last year’s Tropical Storm Irene. Lots of unwanted material was deposited along the banks and within the stream, interrupting the natural flow of the water. This material was removed, and some was used, along with new stone, to stabilize the streambanks. In October, dozens of native plants and shrubs were planted along English Brook near its mouth at Lake George.
» Continue Reading.



Saturday, October 6, 2012

Adirondack Books: Recent Locally Set Fiction

Three books published this year by brand-new novelists remind us of the rich literary opportunities the Adirondacks offer for writers. History, nature, and mystery unite in three novels set in the Adirondacks by three seemingly disparate authors.

Tibetta’s World, historical nonfiction writer Caperton Tissot’s first novel, offers a deeply class-conscious historical and philosophical look into great camp life.  Barbara Delaney, a hiking guide and co-author with husband Russell Dunn of the historically minded hiking guides Trails with Tales, has brought forward Finding Griffin a family mystery centered on a town reclaimed by the Adirondack forest. Finally, Florida lawyer and part-time Bolton resident Thomas G. Kane has published his second novel Desperate Days, a continuation of his first hard-boiled Adirondack Matt O’Malley mystery thriller featuring a dabbling of Adirondack history and landscape, and the Russian mob. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, April 11, 2012

High Peaks Happy Hour: Pub on 9, Bolton

Having only been open since January of 2012, the Pub on 9 is the youngest pub we have had the privilege to review. So far, they seem to be doing everything right. Located south of the village of Bolton Landing, the Pub on 9 is on Route 9N, or Lake Shore Drive, between Diamond Point and Bolton. Operating as the Wooden Barrel in past years, new owners Bob and Noelle Schwab eagerly wait to see what their first summer will bring. Set back a comfortable distance from Route 9N, with plenty of parking, a large deck offering sunshine or the shade of table umbrellas, the pub is a perfect spot for entertainment, indoors or out.

The bartender, Jon, is an enthusiastic, attentive, personable (and did we mention very handsome) guy with tireless energy and humor. His animated nature and quick wit kept us amused as he exchanged barbs with another patron, who asked that we not divulge his affiliation with the aforementioned bartender. He also told us a little about his participation in the Fire Tower Challenge, suggesting it as a theme for out next book. Hmm… The Firewater Challenge? We chatted with Noelle, who took a break from her daily chores to talk about the pub’s future plans.

Currently open Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 5 p.m. until 2 a.m., the Pub on 9 will add Wednesday and Sunday this summer, and plan to continue with Sunday operation through football season. This year they closed for the month of March and anticipate closing on Thanksgiving and Christmas. The generous dance floor rocks with musical entertainment on Friday and Saturday nights, and Noelle hopes to add a Karaoke Night on Wednesday nights for the summer, as well as live music on the deck when weather permits. The deck currently offers picnic table seating, but will have patio tables in the summer season. Suggesting that the cook probably doesn’t have much of a social life, the kitchen usually stays open until just before the bar closes, so don’t be afraid to stop in for a late-night snack. The restaurant will also be offering delivery to nearby motels this summer, something that is sure to boost their notoriety.

The Pub on 9’s huge (by our standards) three-sided bar seats 24 and is stocked with all of the necessities: an abundant draft beer selection (10 flavors!), coolers full of bottled beers, and much more than the basics on the liquor shelves. Pine predominates, from walls to ceiling. The spacious floor plan flows seamlessly from bar to dining to a large game room, creating separate but inclusive spaces throughout. Three TVs suspended stadium style above the bar allow viewing from all sides and there’s another in the game room. The 70-inch monster flat screen may be best viewed from a comfortable club chair in the dining area, but can be seen from pretty much everywhere. The atmosphere is simple, clean and spacious. Decoration mostly consists of mirrored beer advertisements and a neon Welcome to Bolton sign (which Jon took pains to point out, so we felt we should mention it). Happy Hour is from 5 to 6 p.m. daily with $1.00 PBR drafts, $1 off well drinks and 1/2 off appetizer pricing.

Already known for the hand cut fries and homemade soups, the menu also features signature specialties, the 9 Burger and the 9 Dog. Plenty of options are available on the menu and range from $7.99 to $12.99, but they already expect to expand their summer menu. Hopefully they’ll be breaking out the blenders too for margaritas and daiquiris on the deck. Pam suggested adding a nine-shot cocktail (the 9 on 9?) as a signature bar offering.

It’s difficult to describe a bar based merely on having had a good time. From Jon’s greeting as soon as we walked in, to introductions to anyone else who entered or passed through, we were made to feel like invited guests and familiar friends. As the conversation turned to the mild weather and early emergence of mint and rhubarb, we swapped drink recipes (our Rhubarb Margarita) with celebrity bartender Kate (her Summer Squeeze). Kate, of Frederick’s in Bolton Landing, offered her endorsement of the Pub on 9 as a keeper, and a definite contender for the top 46. It’s places like this, where drink recipes are exchanged and rhubarb plants are procured, that remind us that the Adirondack region is just one big neighborhood.

Kim and Pam Ladd’s book, Happy Hour in the High Peaks, is currently in the research stage. Together they visit pubs, bars and taverns with the goal of selecting the top 46 bars in the Adirondack Park. They regularly report their findings here at the Almanack and at their own blog, or follow them on Facebook, and ADK46barfly on Twitter.



Wednesday, March 21, 2012

High Peaks Happy Hour: Market Place Steakhouse, Bolton Landing

Now here’s a place with curb appeal. Driving through Bolton Landing, we nearly ignored the Market Place Steakhouse & More until we spotted the words Sports Bar etched on the bottom of one of the windows. Stained cedar shake siding, varied rooflines, and simple, understated signage create an inviting façade. The street-front deck is small with turned posts and balusters, finished in rich browns. Double doors to the dining room, in pristine condition, indicate that the premises are well maintained.

First impressions enticed us to see more and music playing from outdoor speakers beckoned us in. Stealing a brief glance at the dining room features, we headed straight for the bar.

We continued to drink in the decor while Tami prepared our drinks. Floors of oversized tile in the main bar area, a small green enamel gas stove walled in a far corner with a river stone backdrop, and a copper sidebar on the partition wall, ready to seat eight in backless black and blonde stools, all add to the interior appeal. A small sunny alcove houses four pub tables with seating for 16. Known as the rock and roll room, an impressive collection of autographed guitars and posters is displayed on the walls.

In keeping with the Sports Bar designation, TVs are placed throughout the establishment, the majority located in the bar area. Tami informed us that there were, in fact, 14 in all, including the outdoor dining area in fair weather months. And yet, it wasn’t overdone. The pub area was tastefully finished with a variety of sports memorabilia, again in perfect moderation.

The Market Place Steakhouse was originally an A&P supermarket and was known more recently as Michael Arthur’s Steakhouse. Steve McCranels and Amy Ullrich opened the current version in July of 2011. Open every day in the summer, The Market Place is closed on Tuesday and Wednesday in the off season. The sports bar is open at 4 p.m. and the restaurant opens at 5 p.m. Happy Hour is daily from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. with $1 baby (7 oz.) beers and $2 beer or well drinks. Closing times vary, but around 11 p.m. is fairly standard. Three-course dinner specials make the Market Place a popular dining venue, but Open Mic Night on Monday nights and live musical entertainment on Saturday nights fill in where sports leave off.

On street parking is easily available in the winter months, but harder to find in the summer. A small parking area behind the Market Place offers limited parking, with an entrance to the bar from the back. Bolton Landing has several public parking areas as well.

The Market Place was not our intended destination. We had heard of a new bar in Bolton Landing and were looking for it when we found the Market Place. Perfectly content to stay put, we found the service was as pleasing as the décor. Tami was pleasant, attentive and professional. Once engaged in conversation, she kept one eye on the other patrons, while she imparted information to us. At her suggestion, we couldn’t resist sharing their signature drink, a Pear Martini, made with pear vodka and elderberry liqueur.

The Market Place is the perfect place for a break from the beach, or as a rest for wanderers. Family-friendly, food and drink prices are reasonable. The ambiance is free.

Kim and Pam Ladd’s book, Happy Hour in the High Peaks, is currently in the research stage. Together they visit pubs, bars and taverns with the goal of selecting the top 46 bars in the Adirondack Park. They regularly report their findings here at the Almanack and at their own blog, or follow them on Facebook, and ADK46barfly on Twitter.



Tuesday, October 11, 2011

LGA Completes Indian Brook Project

A multi-year project to protect the upstream waters of Indian Brook has been completed by the Lake George Association (LGA). The project is located at the intersection of Federal Hill and Sawmill roads in the town of Bolton.

Over a number of years, a small section of Indian Brook started to collect sediment in an area that was once a swimming hole. Eventually the swimming hole completely filled in, and non-wetland vegetation became established. Without the swimming hole to slow the velocity of the water, the brook started to carry more sediment downstream and into Lake George, contributing to a delta at the mouth of the brook.

In 2009, the LGA cleaned out the swimming hole. Approximately 500 cubic yards of material were removed. In the spring of 2010, native shrubs were planted along the bank to filter storm runoff. The former swimming hole is now functioning as a sediment basin, allowing sediment that is carried during high flow periods to swirl around and drop out of the stream. The sediment remains in the basin and does not flow down to the Lake.

This summer the LGA completed construction of a second sediment basin, a little further upstream from the original. “Our goal with this second project was two-fold,” said Randy Rath, LGA project manager. “One, create an offline basin that will capture and settle out suspended material during storm events. Two, enhance an existing wetland area and use the natural process of wetland formation to remove some nutrients present in the water column.”

“The wetland area is actually more like a sand bar,” Rath said. “It was originally formed during the 2005 storm event that brought about 7” of rain and washed out many roads in the Bolton area. During the storm, some finer material was deposited on the back end of the sandbar, and the area was eventually able to support wetland vegetation.”

LGA Education Director Emily DeBolt selected plants to match wetland species already present in the area. After installation by LGA staff, the wetland plants were given over a month to grow. With frequent watering from LGA staff and some timely rain, all of the plants and grasses survived a hot summer. Initially the wetlands were separated from the flow of the stream by sand bags and a straw bale dike. Fortunately the dike was not opened until after Tropical Storm Irene, and even though water overflowed the dike during the storm, the basin and wetlands remained intact, and continue to function as designed.

A third component of this Indian Brook project included roadside drainage improvements. A roadside ditch was stabilized and several check dams were put in place to slow the stormwater flow running down the shoulder of Federal Hill Road. A small basin installed at the end of the ditch captures the flow and allows sediment and debris to fall out. Additional road shoulder work allows for some stormwater sheet flow to occur over a vegetated area. The remaining shoulder work reinforced and directed the flow around a bend in the road to another small basin that captures the stormwater.

“Now with these essential upstream projects complete,” Walt Lender, LGA Executive Director, said. “We expect to see a dramatic reduction in the growth of the delta at the mouth of Indian Brook. The size of the delta that exists there now we know is not healthy for the Lake, and we are moving forward with our effort to remove this delta, as well as deltas located at the mouth of Finkle and Hague brooks,” he added.

Photos: Above, an area of Indian Brook earlier this year filled in with sediment; below, the same area of Indian Brook after a sediment basin and wetlands enhancement area was created.



Thursday, September 29, 2011

LGLC Sponsors ‘Observe the Moon Night’

TThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) is sponsoring its second International Observe the Moon Night, October 8, 2011, hosted by Up Yonda Farm in Bolton Landing, from 6 – 8 pm. LGLC is currently the only event sponsor in the Adirondack Park.

International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) 2011 is the second annual public outreach event dedicated to engaging the lunar science and education community, amateur astronomers, space enthusiasts, and the general public in annual lunar observation campaigns that share the excitement of lunar science and exploration.

Observe the Moon Night in Bolton will include lunar scientist Rosemary Millham, Ph.D. and provide an opportunity to observe the Moon through telescopes, simulate your own lunar impacts, and more.

Dr. Millham is currently the science coordinator for the secondary science education program and assistant professor at SUNY New Paltz, and works part-time for NASA GSFC in science writing and curriculum development.

Participants should meet at Up Yonda Farm Environmental Education Center, 5239 Lake Shore Drive (Rt. 9N), for an indoor lunar presentation and explanation of the project, from 6-7:00 pm. The group will then go outdoors to view the moon. Dr. Millham will lead the group in lunar observations and conduct activities from 7:30-8:00. Participants are then invited to return indoors for light refreshments.

Participants may wish to bring a camera and their own binoculars or a telescope, should wear sturdy shoes and dress for cool evening temperatures.

This is a free event and for all ages. Registration is not required but is appreciated. Please call 644-9673 or email shoffman@lglc.org to sign up.



Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Summer Serenades at Sembrich Opera House

Music and mountains seem to go together—and there are plenty of places to find it. One of the special secrets of Bolton Landing on Lake George is the Marcella Sembrich Opera House Museum, which this Saturday will be featuring a vocal recital with mezzo-soprano Lucille Beer as one event in their ongoing summer concert series. Ms. Beer will be singing various pieces from composers such as Mahler, Copeland, Brahms, and Debussy, accompanied by Michael Clement on piano.

The historic Sembrich Museum is a living tribute to the large and colorful life of opera singer Marcella Sembrich, who spent the latter part of her life in Bolton Landing, teaching voice students at the studio that is still part of the property. At twenty-five she debuted at the Metropolitan Opera, embarking on a long and successful career. Her travels took her around the world where her eye for impressionist paintings and other artworks helped her collection grow impressively. Those, along with mementos and memorabilia of a unique life form the basis of this wonderful place to visit.

But if all this isn’t enough to convince you, then you simply must go to just to step back in time and enjoy one of the finest views of Lake George available, as it must have been a hundred years ago.

Tickets for the Lucille Beer recital are $20. Other concerts rounding out the last weeks of the season include “An Evening with the Hyperion String Quartet,” on Saturday August 27th ($25), and a recital on Saturday, September 3rd by pianist Thomas Pandolfi, playing music by Liszt, Scriabin, Chopin, and Gershwin ($25).

For more information, call Faith Bouchard at 518-644-2431, or visit the Sembrich’s website.

Photo: Marcella Sembrich in the 1880s.



Thursday, July 28, 2011

Second Asian Clam Infestation Found in Lake George

A new infestation of the invasive species Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) has been discovered in Lake George in Boon Bay in the Town of Bolton. The new infestation was discovered as part of the FUND for Lake George’s Eurasian watermilfoil management and control program in cooperation with the Lake George Park Commission. Initial survey work by the RPI Darrin Fresh Water Institute in Boon Bay estimates the population to be 3.75 acres – 5 acres in size.

This is the second infestation discovered in Lake George. Last fall a 5-acre infestation in the Village of Lake George was discovered. The Lake George Asian Clam Rapid Response Task Force organized to combat this infestation and a treatment effort has been underway in the Village since late April under permits from the Adirondack Park Agency and NYS Department of Environmental Conservation. Over 725 benthic barriers have been installed to suffocate the clams. » Continue Reading.



Wednesday, July 6, 2011

The Almanack Welcomes Arts Writer Linda Peckel

Please join me in welcoming the Almanack‘s newest contributor Linda J. Peckel. Peckel explores the Adirondacks by following the arts. Originally from Croton-on-Hudson, she developed a lifelong interest in the Hudson River School of painting, and has since expanded her appreciation to many types of art that hail from the Hudson River Valley and the Adirondacks.

She managed the Lakeshore Gallery in Bolton Landing during the 2009 season, and has reported on the arts from Albany to Canada for Examiner.com and her own ArtsEnclave blog. Linda has crewed on film sets, worked on film and music festivals, and interviewed painters, photographers and artists of all kinds.

Also a health writer, Linda often writes about mind-body connections. She has written for magazines such as Boston Home & Garden, Family Circle and Fairfield County Woman. She co-wrote the e-book, Just What the Doctor Ordered—An Insider’s Guide to Medical Writing with Nancy Monson, and contributed to Monson’s book, Craft to Heal—Soothing Your Soul with Sewing, Painting and Other Pasttimes.

Peckel’s first contribution to the Adirondack Almanack, on the new Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait exhibit at the Adirondack Museum, will appear this afternoon.



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