Posts Tagged ‘Center for Biological Diversity’

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Holiday Hookup? 40,000 Free Endangered Species Condoms

Endangered Species CondomsWith the holiday season in full swing, the Center for Biological Diversity is distributing 40,000 free Endangered Species Condoms to encourage people to invite wildlife into holiday celebrations by talking about the effects of rampant human population growth on the environment and wildlife. More babies are conceived between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day than any other time of year.

“The reality is that as human population grows, we’re crowding wildlife into extinction, and if we don’t start addressing this soon it will be too late for many endangered species,” according to Leigh Moyer, the Center’s population organizer. “While it may make family dinner conversation a little awkward, polar bears, sea otters and other wildlife will thank you for making their future a part of your holiday celebrations.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Vasectomy Day Advocates: ‘Get Whacked for Wildlife’

Get_Whacked_For_Wildlife_shirt_RM_Model_FPWC_1-scrIn honor of Friday’s World Vasectomy Day, the Center for Biological Diversity is encouraging men to “get whacked for wildlife” to highlight the pressure human population growth puts on wildlife and the role men can play in preventing unplanned pregnancies.

Men who pledge to get a vasectomy for World Vasectomy Day can get a free “Get Whacked for Wildlife” t-shirt featuring a polar bear carrying a pair of scissors on the front and text on the back that reads: “With more than 7 billion people, we’re crowding wildlife off the planet. Vasectomies help.” The Center is also planning to cover the costs for 20 vasectomies at two New York City clinics as part of World Vasectomy Day. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Fish and Wildlife Service May Weaken Bat Protections

northern long-eared bat in Illinois with symptoms of white-nose syndromeThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has proposed weakening protections for the northern long-eared bat by reducing its stats from “endangered” to “threatened”. Advocates for endangered species say FWS has included a special rule aimed at conceding to pressure from industries and politicians critical of the Endangered Species Act.

The less-protective proposal comes despite the fact that the bat, which has been decimated by the fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome, has already declined by up to 99 percent in the Northeast. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Endangered Species Act Protection Sought For Monarchs

800px-Monarch_In_MayScientists, wildlife conservationists, and food safety advocates have petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus).

“Monarchs are in a deadly free fall and the threats they face are now so large in scale that Endangered Species Act protection is needed sooner rather than later, while there is still time to reverse the severe decline in the heart of their range,” Dr. Lincoln Brower, a monarch butterfly researcher and conservationist, and one of those seeking the Endangered Species designation. The Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety are serving as co-lead petitioners, joined by Brower the Xerces Society. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Bicknell’s Thrush Endangered Species Protection Stepped-Up

Bicknell's Thrush, Catharus bicknelli, by T. B. RyderThe Center for Biological Diversity reached a settlement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service late Monday giving the agency four years to consider whether to protect the Bicknell’s thrush under the Endangered Species Act.

The thrush nests only high in the mountains of the U.S. Northeast and eastern Canada, including Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York. Scientists have predicted that 98 percent or more of the songbird’s U.S. habitat could be lost to climate change. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 27, 2013

Lawsuit Seeks Protection for Bicknell’s Thrush

Bicknell's Thrush, Catharus bicknelli, by T. B. RyderThe Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit today against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to protect Bicknell’s thrush as an endangered species.

The thrush breeds only high in the mountains of the Northeast and eastern Canada, including Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York; scientists have predicted that 98 percent or more of the songbird’s U.S. habitat could be lost due to climate change. The Center petitioned for protection for the imperiled songbird in 2010, but the agency has failed to make a final decision on the petition. » Continue Reading.