Posts Tagged ‘Climate Change’

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Antarctic Sciences Director Speaking on Climate Change

antartica mapNational Science Foundation Antarctic Astrophysics & Geospace Sciences Program Director Vladimir Papitashvili will speak on global warming Tuesday, July 11, starting at 7 pm at Town of Lake Pleasant Public Library, 2864 State Route 8, Speculator.

Papitashvili is responsible for the NSF’s Antarctic research, including its role in global systems. Examples include ozone, greenhouse gases, ocean circulation and sea level, climate changes, and continental drift. A new proposal focuses on how solar activity influences the properties and dynamics of the polar atmosphere and the global geo-space system. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 26, 2017

Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation Grants Available

Climate Change Hardiness Gardening ZonesUp to $9.5 million is available to award grants between $10,000 and $2,000,000 from the Climate Smart Communities Grant Program for implementation projects related to flood risk reduction, extreme event preparation, reduction of vehicle miles travelled (VMT), reduction of food waste, reduction of landfill methane leakage, and reduction of hydrofluorocarbons emissions from refrigeration and other air conditioning equipment. In addition, $500,000 is available to award grants between $10,000 and $100,000 for certification projects that advance adaptation, land use, transportation, and organic waste management planning, inventory and assessment actions aligned with Climate Smart Communities Certification requirements. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Wetland Monitoring Sites Established in Adirondack Park

Wetland in Winter photo by Steve LangdonThe College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) in Syracuse, New York partnered with the New York State Adirondack Park Agency (APA), NYNHP and Paul Smiths College to complete a two-phase EPA Wetland Protection Program Development grant. The grant was used to establish a network of long-term wetland monitoring sites to enable analysis of wetland responses to climate change.

The project fills in gaps of knowledge in Adirondack Peatlands by creating a snapshot of what these peatlands look like today and monitoring key environmental, and ecological indicators of change such as plants and animals. The project produced a network of volunteers trained to conduct long-term monitoring of wetlands, a wetland condition database, preliminary data analysis, and allowed for data distribution. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 13, 2017

David Gibson On The People’s Climate March

The feeling that remains in me following the People’s Climate March in Washington, D.C. is one of renewal. Spring in the northeast has a lot to do with sustaining it. A wood thrush is singing in our woods again (miracle of miracles, given their steady decline in the northeast), a newly arrived pair of gray catbirds are eagerly consuming the mealworms in our feeder, bluebird nestlings can be heard peeping from the nest box. It is a time of renewal of life and of faith.

But to witness the strength and determination of that huge crowd clogging the streets of D.C.; to be with so many in their teens and 20s climbing those big trees on the Ellipse to get a better picture of the immense crowd; to see faces of all colors; to feel the pounding pulse of the drummers from North Carolina who never once stopped their rhythm from 11 am to 4 pm; to see sweat pouring off a not so young woman from that same state determined to keep her banner aloft despite the gusts of wind on Pennsylvania Avenue almost (but not quite) as determined to bring it down; to stay in the close company of three very determined New York State women, each about 76 years young, keeping to their feet all day in 92 degrees (one keeping beat with the drummers with a whistle); these are all impressions I will not soon forget and which renew my faith in humankind. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Local Students Leads Catskill Climate Summit

Wild Center’s Youth Climate Program Students and staff from The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Program traveled to the Frost Valley YMCA in Claryville, NY this spring to educate 60 students from the Catskills and New York City area schools about how to lead on climate change issues during a two-day Youth Climate Leadership Summit. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Climate, Science Marches Planned Locally

NYS CapitolThere will be several Climate Marches held locally from April 22 to 29 to show support for the People’s Climate and Science Marches in Washington, DC. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

Some Early Research on Climate Change and Soil

climate changeFor many of us, winter in the Northeast means cold temperatures and piles of snow, drifting through forests and across fields. It’s hard to imagine that winter here could be different, but the prospect of climate change has scientists asking just what our winters might look like in the future – and how those changes might influence forest ecology.

At the U.S. Forest Service’s Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, scientists are thinking about the year 2100. How much warming will occur isn’t certain, but some projections suggest that average air temperatures in our region may increase 5.5 to 9 degrees over the course of this century. The effects are likely to be complex and are difficult to predict, with benefits and costs for different organisms. Some tree species, for example, may benefit from longer and warmer growing seasons, but they may also sustain root damage from more frequent soil freezing. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 13, 2017

State Owned Ski Resorts Seeking 100% Renewable Energy

Three New York-owned ski resorts, Belleayre Ski Resort, Gore Mountain and Whiteface Mountain, have joined the Climate Reality Project I AM PRO SNOW 100% Committed program and pledged to be powered by 100 percent renewal energy by 2030.

The initiative corresponds with the Cuomo administration’s Clean Energy Standard, which requires that half of all electricity used in New York come from renewable sources by 2030. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 6, 2017

Guest Essay: National Security and Climate Change

The scale of the threats to our national and global security that climate change is creating is staggering. These are well known to America’s military and security experts. Yet the voices of these persons are not being adequately heard and acted on in Washington, even as these dangers to our country increase.

Climate change is creating a tremendous range of problems that will increasingly cause and worsen violence and conflicts. For example, droughts (like that in Syria) are multiplying the scale of conflict and migration. Water, food and grazing shortages will push tremendous numbers of people into areas controlled by others, creating and worsening conflicts in places like Darfur, in Sudan. Rising sea levels are a truly enormous threat, including through the future flooding of mega-cities on coasts around the world and the forced displacement of many millions. The melting of the Arctic icecaps is already creating international tensions with Russia over rights to underwater resources. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 27, 2017

Climate Change in the North Country Talk Planned

The Alice T. Miner Museum has announced that Dr. Curt Stager, professor of natural sciences at Paul Smith’s College, will speak on the regional impact of climate change on March 2nd.

Climate change is about more than distant polar bears and rising sea levels. It is happening here, too. The talk will look at what changes are already under way, and what changes may be coming in the future. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 11, 2017

Adirondack Wildlife: The Disappearing Spruce Grouse

The spattering of sizable tracts of boreal forests that remain in the Adirondacks serve as home to several species of birds that have evolved the ability to survive in northern taiga woodlands. Among the feathered creatures that are well adapted for a life in lowland stands of conifers is the spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis), a dark colored bird viewed by some as being as much a symbol of the Great Northwood’s as the moose.

As its name implies, the spruce grouse inhabits those softwood forests dominated mainly by spruce; yet not all spruce forests serve as home to this northern bird. High elevation forests that cover the upper slopes of our tallest peaks are not as suitable as lowland locations despite the similar presence of spruce and balsam fir. Because higher altitudes are more frequently buffeted by strong winds, the microclimate that exists there is more adverse than the one that characterizes sheltered, lowland settings. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Climate Resiliency Planning Grants Available

The NYS Department of State (DOS) is seeking applications for the Countywide Resiliency Planning Grant Program. This is a competitive funding program for the development of Countywide Resiliency Plans that primarily address climate change risks and vulnerabilities associated with: an increase in frequency and severity of storm and precipitation events; sea-level rise; storm surge; and flooding. The Countywide Resiliency Planning Grant Program is available to upstate counties in New York that were not previously covered by the NY Rising Community Reconstruction Program. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 31, 2016

Climate Change: Avoiding the ‘Natural Variations’ Pitfall

“Everybody complains about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.”

For over a century, this comment has served as the standard retort when a friend or colleague laments hot and humid weather or complains about a massive snow storm. But when University at Albany Interim President James R. Stellar uses it to talk about work at UAlbany’s Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Studies (DAES), he’s not grumbling. He uses it as a setup line before he talks about what he, his colleagues, and many others in academia are actually doing about the weather as the world wrestles with persistent climate change caused by humans. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Funding Opportunities for Climate Smart Communities

The New York State (NYS) Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced nine different sources of financial support for a variety of climate, energy, and sustainability initiatives.

DEC Electronic Waste Assistance Grants – $1.8 million

Applications Accepted between January through 31, 2017
Eligible Entities: all municipalities within New York State (“Municipality” means a local public authority or public benefit corporation, a county, city, town, village, or Indian tribe or nation residing within New York state, or any combination thereof, or a school district or supervisory district.)
DEC announced that a second round of grant funding from the Environmental Protection Fund (EPF) is being made available to help municipalities across the state address costs associated with the collection and recycling of eligible electronic wastes (e-waste). Municipalities may receive reimbursement of up to 50 percent of eligible expenses incurred for recycling of e-waste between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017. Application materials, guidance documents, and important information for Electronic Waste Assistance Grants are available on DEC’s website. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Adirondack Youth Climate Summit Getting Underway

Adirondack Wild CenterThe eighth Adirondack Youth Climate Summit is taking place November 3rd and 4th at The Wild Center in Tupper Lake. Over 25,000 students are represented by the 250 participants from 30 high schools, colleges and universities across the region. The program has created a White House Champion of Change and sent student leaders to the United Nations and COP 21 in Paris. » Continue Reading.


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