Posts Tagged ‘crime and justice’

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Early Long Lake: Senator Orville Platt

7 u s senator orville platt from conn.What is believed to be the first summer camp on Long Lake was built on Birch Point in 1870 for Senator Orville Hitchcock Platt. Platt was born in Washington, CT in 1827. His father was a farmer who also served the community as deputy sheriff, judge of probate, and a school teacher. Platt’s parents were both active abolitionists and their home was a station on the Underground Railroad.

As a youth, Platt helped his father on the farm and also enjoyed roaming the countryside hunting and fishing in the woods and streams of northwest Connecticut. He attended school in Washington, CT, the student of abolitionist Frederic Gunn. When a pro-slavery group forced Gunn to close his school he and Platt (as assistant teacher) moved to the abolitionist stronghold of Towanda, PA. Orville Platt spent a year there and met a young lady who would later become his wife. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 14, 2015

It’s Time to Raise the Age for Criminal Prosecution

TMDA LogoThis spring, New York has an opportunity to modernize its criminal justice system so it helps children who get into trouble with the law, while also helping our communities become more diverse, prosperous and successful.

A goal for the State should be to help troubled youths lead more productive lives. This, in turn, will make our communities safer and more productive. The State Legislature can help the Adirondack Park build a brighter future for our communities, as it protects our clean water and wilderness, by raising the age as the Governor has proposed. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Mob Rule: The Murder Of Orrando Dexter

William_RockefellerThe village of Brandon, in the town of Santa Clara, Franklin County, was built by a lumber company for its workers.   When the company and the lumber industry declined, most of the people left.  John D. Rockefeller’s brother, Standard Oil co-founder William Avery Rockefeller Jr., bought the land surrounding the village, fenced it in, and posted it. Woods located on private property that had been open for years to sportsmen and other residents were suddenly closed.

William Rockefeller made offers to the villagers for their houses and in the end just a few residents remained. One was Civil War veteran Oliver Lamora, with whom Rockefeller would battle over access to his new property for years. The full story of Lamora’s battles, financial and legal, against Rockefeller is given in Lawrence Gooley’s excellent 2007 book Oliver’s War (I wrote this article several years before Gooley’s book). » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Mining Company Could Grow First Legal Adirondack Pot

1576 p. 01 Gordon medical marijuana, Peckham Chestertown, Andy Darnley Nationwide Elevator, Dunham Railroads end of line.inddA mining company in Chestertown wants to be the first to grow legal marijuana in the Adirondack Park.  Etain, a subsidiary of Peckham Industries, wants to use property on Route 9 just south of the village for a medical marijuana growing facility. A portion of the property is currently used as a log yard.

The proposal has won unanimous support from the Chester Town Board and considerable buzz among supporters. “It’s a product that would benefit patients in need,” Town Supervisor and Adirondack Local Government Review Board Executive Director Fred Monroe told the Post Star. Monroe said that it would provide jobs and offer a tax benefit to Warren County.  A front page story in the Glens Falls Chronicle by news editor Gordon Woodworth proclaimed “Medical marijuana helped me”. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 2, 2015

2 Notorious Guides In Adirondack History

P326ABefore railroads and automobiles, travelers depended on the quality and skills of North Woods guides to show them the region’s natural beauty, to feed them and provide the best in hunting and fishing.  Often, guides were entrusted with taking ladies in the woods.

The guides, especially those not aligned with large hotels, depended on per diem fees for subsistence and quality reputations for honesty, dependability and woodcraft benefited all guides.  So when two guides brought dishonor to the profession, guides hoped people realized these two were the exception. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Shine On! Empowers Young Girls With Media Safety

10991668_10153126577571660_6364932009093070490_oMy husband and I are the parents that have limited “screen time” for our children. We have had numerous conversations about Internet safety. We’ve read books and talked with friends. We’ve always felt that our Internet restrictions are great, but children eventually leave the small bubble where we live.

Children share information instantaneously now and I’ve always known that I can’t shield my children from everything. I want to make sure that that they have enough information to make good choices when, not if, a situation arises.

Kids are bombarded by negativity on computers, on their phones, in advertisements, on television – How do we present a positive message that isn’t in the form of another lecture? » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 21, 2015

Recognizing the Adirondacks’ Hidden Diversity

TMDA LogoWilderness advocates in the environmental movement have known for years there is a problem when it comes to diversity and the future of the Adirondacks. We look around the backcountry on an inviting summer weekend and we see people who use, love, and defend New York’s wildest lands. But we don’t see many people of color. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Hunter Admits Shooting Bull Moose

MooseA New Hampshire man has admitted illegally shooting a bull moose in the town of Croghan just west of the Adirondack Park.

Steven Zehr of Walpole, New Hampshire, turned himself in after shooting the animal on private land on the morning of November 25, according to Stephen Litwhiler, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

Litwhiler said Zehr was in a tree stand and mistook the moose, which weighed nearly 690 pounds, for an antlered deer. It was about 10 a.m. when the moose was killed. Zehr was charged with illegally taking wild game, a misdemeanor, and paid a $1,200 civil fine. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 14, 2015

Adirondack Outlaws: Bad Boys, Lawless Ladies

AdirondackOutlaws_Cover_FINALLocal writer and senior editor at Adirondack Life magazine Niki Kourofsky exposes the North Country’s shadowy past of crime and dark deeds in a new book, Adirondack Outlaws: Bad Boys And Lawless Ladies (Farcountry Press, 2015).

Kourofsky’s storytelling puts readers in the thick of shootouts, jewel heists, bank robberies, manhunts, and unsolved murders. Spanning eight decades of Adirondack history and ranging from Glens Falls to the Canadian border, Adirondack Outlaws is rich in the details of safe-crackers, sneak thieves, and stick-up men and gangs, along with several murders, manhunts, and unsolved mysteries. » Continue Reading.


Friday, January 23, 2015

Adirondack Museum Cabin Fever Sunday Series

Screen Shot 2015-01-20 at 2.38.32 PMOn our visits to the Adirondack Museum, my family has always found that there really isn’t enough time to see it all in one day. That is why the Adirondack Museum Cabin Fever Sundays present a different way of learning about the vast information tucked within the museum’s buildings in Blue Mountain Lake.

According to Adirondack Museum Marketing Assistant Paige Doerner the second Cabin Fever event will feature Adirondack Life Senior Editor Niki Kourofsky’s tales of “Adirondack Outlaws.” Kourofsky is bringing the Adirondack’s criminal element to light and is highlighting just a few of the historical scallywags, bandits and fiends from her recently published book, Adirondack Outlaws: Bad Boys and Lawless Ladies. » Continue Reading.


Page 1 of 2012345...1020...Last »