Posts Tagged ‘education’

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Wild Center’s Jen Krester Receives Top EPA Award

Jen Krester with EPA AwardJen Kretser, Program Director at The Wild Center, has received a 2015 United States Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Champion Award.

Kretser was nominated for her work on the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit, now in its seventh year and held each November at the Center in Tupper Lake, NY.  The Adirondack Youth Climate Summit has inspired Summits in Finland and Vermont. » Continue Reading.


Monday, May 4, 2015

Arbor Day Ed-Venture In Memory Of Brother Yusuf

DEC Forest Rangers demonstrate for the groupIn recognition of Arbor and Earth Days, volunteers from the Youth Ed-Venture and Nature Network in Albany recently joined forces with Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve and the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation to plant several hundred trees near the Hudson River north of Lake Luzerne.

This stewardship project was supervised by NYS  DEC Forest Rangers Charles Kabrehl and Evan Donegan in coordination with DEC foresters in order to stabilize the environment, prevent soil erosion and improve the aesthetic appearance of a popular, heavily used recreation area of the Adirondack Forest Preserve. Potted and bare root trees were provided by the DEC Saratoga Tree Nursery directed by forester David Lee. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 23, 2015

Broadway Veteran Directing Westport School Play

Broadway Veteran to direct Westport Central School PlayThe show will go on for this spring’s Westport Central School Drama Club production of  “Our Miss Brooks”. With the director of the play unexpectedly unavailable, the status of the production was left in question with opening night looming.

“I was speaking with members of Westport’s Depot Theatre board of trustees, who offered to try to help us resolve this time-sensitive situation,” Cynthia Johnston, Superintendent of Schools told the press. “And they came through with not only a director for us, but with a professional Broadway veteran with a familiar face!”
» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Pendragon Theatre’s Young Playwrights Festival

IMG_3821Last year was the first time Saranac Lake’s Pendragon Theatre hosted a playwriting festival for young adults. My daughter and a friend were one of the many students that took advantage of the free day of theatre workshops.

The workshops focused on playwriting through fun, engaging exercises for children in grades K-6. Now in its second year, the format has slightly altered to allow excerpts and staged readings from local adult authors. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

At SUNY Adirondack Local Chefs Mentor Future Pros

DSCN6324The SUNY Adirondack culinary arts program has opened their doors to the public at their culinary center, featuring a full dining room and an open kitchen.  I recently had lunch with students from this semester’s basic food prep and dining service classes.

How often when dining, do you get to see the chefs in action? For some of these future chefs their experience at the culinary center is their first on a hot line. The prep area was a busy scene when I arrived, as students were focused on finishing their mise en place (“putting in place”, or setting up) in preparation for lunch.
» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 16, 2015

ESF Joins Science and Humanities Network

Expansion-EvolutionforbarVinoSUNY ESF, through two of its regional campuses, has joined a group of leading biological field stations in a network devoted to bridging the gap between scientific inquiry on one side and arts and humanities on the other.

The college’s Newcomb Campus and the Cranberry Lake Biological Station, both in the Adirondacks, are members of Ecological Reflections, a network that brings together scientists, writers and artists to explore the connection between science and the humanities. The network grew out of a National Science Foundation-funded Long-Term Ecological Research program. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 15, 2015

Divesting from Fossil Fuels

Global_Carbon_Emissions.svgIt’s official – 2014 was the hottest year on record. And most everyone I talk to is concerned about the threat that global warming and climate change, with their potentially devastating and possibly permanent consequences, pose to the lives and livelihoods of our children and grandchildren.

Scientists tell us that sea levels and water temperatures are rising, imperiling coastal populations, as well as regional environments and economies; that sea ice is being lost and glaciers receding at unprecedented rates or disappearing altogether; that seasons and plant and animal ranges are shifting and habitat vanishing, threatening to drive entire species of animals to extinction; that weather patterns are becoming more erratic and less predictable; and that worldwide, the number, intensity, and resilience of violent tropical storms is increasing. They warn that other potential future effects of global climate change include more frequent wildfires, more severe heat waves, sustained periods of drought in certain regions, and unprecedented winter weather conditions in others; all of which jeopardize fresh water supplies, wildlife, and in some instances, indigenous people and their ways of life. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Entries Sought For Youth Poetry Contest

arts-institute-of-the-arts-and-Humanity-web-logoChildren are required to do school projects, writing assignments and mandatory homework, and many teachers around the region incorporate the Great Adirondack Young People’s Poetry Contest into their curriculum.

For those that can’t, the contest is free and open to all students living in the Adirondack Park. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 9, 2015

The Doanes: Bishops Against Women’s Rights

P2A GWDoaneLast week’s coverage here of Albany’s first Episcopalian Bishop, William Croswell Doane (1832–1913), focused on his opposition to women’s rights, particularly the suffrage movement. There’s much more to his story, including humanitarian works, but the intent was to address his role in thwarting those battling for women’s rights. This is, after all, Women’s History Month.

Although he was a famous man of the cloth, Doane’s comments on suffragettes were sometimes described by the media as caustic, hostile, and vitriolic. But as I discovered, like many other components of his life, they were hardly original. This was an extreme case of the apple not falling far from the tree.

William’s father, George Washington Doane (1799–1859), was the guiding force in his life. The parallels between the two are uncanny. They were either the same age or less than a year different for graduation from college, ordination as deacons, and ordination as priests. Both exerted great influence in the cities where they became bishops, George at Burlington, New Jersey, when he was 33, and William in Albany when he was 37. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Women’s History: Battling Bishop Doane

P1A WCDoane1896“Woman cannot do man’s work. There is not, in my opinion, any mental equality between the sexes…. Women are just as bright as men, but they are less logical, more moved by impulses and instincts…. Each sex must confine itself to certain sorts of occupation, men being unable to do much of women’s work, as women are unable to do much of men’s.”

What a great quotation to open with during Women’s History Month. As you may have guessed, those words were spoken long ago—1909, in fact. The statement alone was disturbing enough, even back then, but what made it worse was the source: not an illiterate, but one of the most powerful and influential men in upstate New York. » Continue Reading.


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