Posts Tagged ‘education’

Saturday, June 18, 2016

An Adirondack Response To The Orlando Massacre

TMDA Logo NewAll of us reel in horror at the violence in Orlando, Florida on Sunday.  As Coordinator for the Adirondack Diversity Advisory Council I feel it important to respond to this tragedy, just as I feel it important to respond as a human being.  In either capacity I struggle to offer any kind of worthy reaction except to express solidarity with the victims and with all who suffer from the conditions that foster the kind of hate and anger we saw unleashed.

Though it is hard to find meaningful words, I think I know the right question to ask.  Where do we go from here?  How does our society move towards a destination where senseless mass killings, where violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, recedes into history?  Many will say that such a future is unimaginable, that there will always be hatred and bitter, alienated individuals capable of acting with insane malice.  To those doubters I ask how such a future can be more unimaginable than what took place Sunday in Orlando. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Two Jefferson County Men Who Made Good in Illinois

P1RockfordMfgCo1889A pair of North Country men, born just a few miles apart in Jefferson County, left New York in their adult years and settled about 65 miles apart in Illinois, where each left his lasting mark. Together, their names were also attached to an institution in Arkansas that lives on nearly a century and a half later.

John Budlong was born in February 1833 in Rodman, New York, about eight miles south of Watertown. The Budlong family has many historical connections dating back to the Revolutionary War. John attended several of the best schools in the region: the Rodman Seminary, the Jefferson County Institute at Watertown, the Adams Institute, and Falley Seminary at Fulton in Oswego County. At the age of 18 he began a wide-ranging teaching career, working in North Carolina, Texas, and Missouri before returning to Rodman, where he continued teaching and began studying law. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 25, 2016

Regional Students Win Awards at NYS History Day

Image of New York State History Day winners Alice Cochran, Christina Lashway, and Nicholas Manfred from Moriah Central School.Several North Country students won recognition at New York State History Day, held in Cooperstown, on Monday, April 18. Grace Sayward, a homeschool student from the Plattsburgh area, placed second in the Junior Historical Paper category. Alice Cochran, Christina Lashway, and Nicholas Manfred, from Moriah Central School, placed third in the Senior Group Exhibit category. Ben Caito and Liam Sayward, homeschool students from the Plattsburgh area, were awarded a special prize from the New York State Historical Association. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 21, 2016

A Children’s Passport to Earth Day in North Creek

IMG_8246For the second year North Creek is focusing children ages 3-10 on Earth Day during a event April 23 from 10 am to 1 pm that features over 15 activities around the village. Children will have the chance to solve everyday problems and learn how to leave the world in a better place.

According to Johnsburg Youth Committee Organizer Kate Hartley the Earth Day Passport activities are within walking distance and teen volunteers will be on hand as guides. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 24, 2016

9th Graders Become Beetle Busters

The Beetle Busters of Indian Lake Central School learned how to check trees for invasive Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer. During National Invasive Species Awareness Week, I had the good fortune to teach Indian Lake Central School’s 9th graders how to become beetle busters. On February 22, they discovered how invasive insects can cause economic, ecologic, and societal harm. For this lesson, we zeroed in on emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle.

The class already had a solid understanding of what invasive species are because their teacher Sandra Bureau had been incorporating invasive species curriculum into their studies since September. Hands shot up when I asked for a definition. I detailed that Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer probably hitched a ride from Asia to the United States in wood packing crates. Without the ecological checks and balances found on their home turf, they reproduce rapidly. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 21, 2016

Pioneering Nurse Linda Richards (Conclusion)

LRichardsP3After a few months’ stay in France, Potsdam native Linda Richards arrived back in the United States in March 1891. With the best credentials in the world for training nurses, she developed new programs or redesigned existing ones at many facilities during the next two decades.

Among them were the Philadelphia Visiting Nurses’ Society; Kirkbride’s Hospital for the Insane (Philadelphia); the Methodist Episcopal Hospital (Philadelphia); the New England Hospital for Women and Children (Roxbury, Massachusetts); and the Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital (New York City). In 1895, during her tenure at Brooklyn, she was elected president of the newly founded American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools for Nurses. Describing the changes she had seen since the early 1870s, Richards called it a “revolution of feeling toward training schools and trained nurses.”

While working with the society, she continued building and improving programs in facilities that included the Hartford Hospital (Connecticut); the University of Pennsylvania Hospital (Philadelphia); the Taunton Hospital for the Insane (Massachusetts); the Worcester Hospital for the Insane (Massachusetts); and the Kalamazoo Insane Asylum (Michigan). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Pioneer Nurse Linda Richards Was Potsdam Native (Part 2)

LRichardsP2After completing the training program and becoming America’s first trained nurse, several options lay before Potsdam native Linda Richards: head nurse at either of two hospitals, operating a nurse’s training program at another, or night superintendent of the Bellevue Hospital Training School in New York City.

While the others appeared more inviting, she chose Bellevue, with clientele from the slums: the poor, sick, mentally ill, and addicted. In her estimation, it was where she could learn the most and at the same time do the most good. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Potsdam Native Linda Richards Was A Pioneering Nurse

LRichardsP1We all affect the lives of others, but the sphere of influence for most folks is limited. Relatively few among us substantially impact multiple generations, but the innovative work of a pioneering North Country native has affected nearly every American and Japanese citizen, plus countless others, for the past 125 years.

Malinda Ann Judson Richards, self-described as Linda Richards, was born in 1841 near Potsdam in St. Lawrence County. Her father, a preacher, named her after one of America’s first female foreign missionaries, Ann Judson. The family left Potsdam and moved to Minnesota when Linda was four years old, but just six weeks after arriving there, Sanford Richards died of tuberculosis. His widow, Betsy, moved the family to Vermont to live with her father. Linda later recalled fond memories of the relationship she shared with her grandfather during this time. They lived with him until he remarried in 1850, at which time Betsy purchased a nearby farm. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 29, 2016

‘Lies My Teacher Told Me’ Author Speaking in Placid Friday

lies my teacher told meThe author of a best-selling book decrying the state of history education in the United States will speak at a teacher workshop in Lake Placid on Friday, March 4.

John Brown Lives! will host James Loewen, author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, at a day-long workshop, “Teaching the Past & Why It Matters Today,” meant to help teachers, librarians and others working with students constructively engage issues of social justice in the classroom and community using history and dialogue as primary tools.

First published in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me challenged traditional historical narratives taught to students. After comparing a dozen history textbooks then in widespread use, Loewen concluded that the books were filled with an “embarrassing blend of bland optimism, blind nationalism, and plain misinformation.” » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Students To Compete In North Country History Day

History-Day-2014-550x437Thirty students from across the North Country will compete in the regional New York State History Day contest held at Fort Ticonderoga on Saturday, March 5, 2016. Students placing first and second in their categories will advance to the New York State History Day Contest in Cooperstown on April 18.

Each year two million students across the country participate in the National History Day program according to Rich Strum, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Education and North Country History Day Regional Coordinator. Students research history topics of their choice related to an annual theme and create exhibits, documentaries, performances, research papers, and website designs.

Students may enter in competition at the regional, state, and national level. Participants include students in grades 6-8 in the Junior Division and grades 9-12 in the Senior Division. National History Day also provides educational services to students and teachers, including a summer internship program, curricular materials, internet resources, and annual teacher workshops and training institutes. » Continue Reading.


Page 1 of 2112345...1020...Last »