Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Volunteers Sought For US National Fly Fishing Championships

us national fly fishing tournamentThe nation’s best fly anglers will be returning to Lake Placid, Wilmington, Saranac Lake, Redford and Malone, June 1–4, 2016 for the U.S. National Fly Fishing Championships, and organizers are looking for volunteers to assist anglers over the three-day catch-and-release competition.

“The event relies on volunteers to record the size and species of every fish caught, and is a great opportunity for avid fishermen to learn from these top anglers and share local ‘intel’, too,” said Ken Crane, event and volunteer organizer. “Anglers will be fishing on the Ausable, Saranac and Salmon Rivers while wading, and Mirror Lake and Lake Colby from boats. No experience is required.” » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 25, 2016

NYS Outdoorsmen Hall of Fame Announces Inductees

outdoorsmen hall of fameThe New York State Outdoorsmen Hall of Fame has announced that it has inducted eight new members, including two posthumously.

The NYSOHOF is an organization dedicated to honoring those individuals who have spent many years preserving outdoor heritage, working for conservation, or enhancing outdoor sports for future generations. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Angler Dies After Falling Through The Ice Of Union Falls Pond

Union Falls Pond A Franklin County angler died after his utility-task-vehicle broke through the ice on Union Falls Pond, according to state police.

Gregory N. Manchester, 59, of Franklin drove his vehicle onto the ice on Sunday to go fishing. He was reported missing the following morning.

A state police helicopter flew over the area and spotted his UTV partially submerged. State forest rangers followed footprints to a seasonal cabin and found Manchester lying on the floor, suffering from severe hypothermia. He was unresponsive.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 6, 2016

Hearing Planned On Lake George Boat Inspections

LG boat inspection stationThe Lake George Park Commission will hold a public hearing on its mandatory boat inspection program on March 30 in Bolton Landing.

The hearing, which will be held in the Town hall from 4 to 6 pm, is a necessary step in the process of making a two-year, pilot invasive species protection program a permanent one.

That program required all boats trailered to Lake George to be inspected for invasive plants and animals before being allowed to launch. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 3, 2016

Women’s Division Returns To Ausable Two-Fly Challenge

Fly fishing on the Ausable in Wilmington (John Warren photo)The 17th annual Ausable Two-Fly Challenge, a catch-and-release trout tournament, is taking place May 20-21 with a reintroduced a women’s division.

A portion of registrations will be donated to Casting for Recovery, which seeks to enhance the quality of life of women with breast cancer through a combination of education, support and fly fishing. Casting for Recovery’s retreats are open to breast cancer survivors of all ages, in all stages of treatment and recovery, and are free to participants.

The Two-Fly Challenge begins Friday, May 20, with a day of fishing followed by a Fly Tyer’s Reception where anglers can share the day’s experiences on the river while learning new fly tying skills, or taking part in the fly casting competition; the Seth Warden Duo will perform live music.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Livingston Stone: Leading 19th Century Fisheries Expert

01LSLivStoneThe American shad is a native fish of East Coast waters like the St. Lawrence and Hudson Rivers, and yet the largest shad population in the world is in the Columbia River on the West Coast, an east-to-west migration of three thousand miles. Humpback whales migrate the same distance in water each year, and caribou do so on land, but the shad of the late 1800s made the trip in style: they took the train. Accompanying them was a man who spent a decade as the leading fish culturist in the North Country.

Livingston Stone was born in 1836 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and graduated from Harvard with honors in 1857. He attended theological school and became a church pastor, but ongoing health issues resulted in an unusual prescription: spend as much time as possible in the outdoors.

A career change was in order, and in the late 1860s, Stone pursued his interest in all things fish. With the intelligence of a Harvard grad and a chess expert, he proved far more capable than most men in his field. In 1871, he helped found the American Fish Culturists Association (which later became the American Fisheries Society), commissioned by the government to restore America’s depleted rivers. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Comments Sought On Adirondack Fishing Regulations

DEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is proposing changes to the fishing regulations and is seeking public comments. Changes being considered to the current freshwater fishing regulations are now available here, and if approved, these regulation changes would take effect on April 1, 2017.

Regulation changes include adjusting creel and minimum size limits for walleye as part of DEC’s multi-year effort to establish walleye populations in candidate waters, as well as protecting walleye where they congregate during the spawning season. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 18, 2016

Trading Post Opens At Pine Cone Grill In Wanakena

Pine ConeA new store that caters to outdoor sports enthusiasts has opened in Wanakena, a tiny hamlet near Cranberry Lake with a  population of less than 100.

The Trading Post at the Pine Cone Grill opened this winter to fill the gap created by the closing of the Wanakena General Store, which sold groceries and basic outdoor supplies.

Rick Kovacs, who owned the Wanakena General Store, shut down in October saying he couldn’t make enough money in the winter months. He had owned the store for about six years, and said one had been at that location for about 60 years. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 13, 2016

DEC Collects 16.8 Million Eggs For NYS Fish Hatcheries

 Collecting heritage straing brook trout eggs.The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and partner agencies collected 16.8 million eggs for the state’s fish hatcheries, the agency has announced.  Each year, DEC staff collect eggs from wild and captive adult fish to rear at DEC fish hatcheries.

After the eggs are taken they are incubated at DEC’s state hatcheries.  After hatching, they are fed and cared for by DEC hatchery staff until they reach target stocking sizes.  Fish from New York hatcheries are stocked in lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers throughout the state, supporting the state’s recreational sport fishery. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 27, 2015

Does Boreas Ponds Dam Belong In A Wilderness Area?

Boreas Ponds aerial - Carl HeilmanWhy do they call it Boreas Ponds? After all, if you look at an aerial photograph, such as the one at left, taken by Carl Heilman II, it’s just one water body. This fact is also evident from the 1999 USGS map below.

The reason is not mysterious. Like many Adirondack lakes, the water level of Boreas Ponds has been raised by a dam. As an 1895 map indicates (it’s shown farther below), Boreas Ponds used to be three ponds connected by narrow channels.

When the state acquires Boreas Ponds from the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, it must decide whether the concrete dam should be retained.

» Continue Reading.


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