Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Conservancy Acquires 135 Acres At Otis Brook In Jay

otis brookLake Placid Land Conservancy recently acquired a 135-acre habitat and open space conservation easement in the Town of Jay, that was donated by local resident Gregory Claude Fetters. The property includes approximately 44 acres of northern Appalachian-Acadian, conifer- hardwood, acidic wetlands and over 90 acres of Laurentian-Acadian pine forest.

Conservation of the property permanently protects a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and allows the property to remain available for sustainable timber harvesting and eligible for enrollment in New York’s 480-A forest tax law. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Lake George Village Boat Launch Update

Lake George Boat Launch photo by Ed BurkeThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Lake George Village Boat Launch on Beach Road remains open to use by boaters.

DEC does not plow the main parking area to protect the porous pavement. When snow depths increase or ice forms on the lake the gate will be shut and the launch will be closed. Ice anglers and others will be able to access the ice on the lake by parking in the auxiliary parking area on the south side of Beach Road.

DEC will put up temporary fencing to create a path with packed snow from the parking area to the lake. Snowmobiles are prohibited in the main parking area outside of the fenced path as they will damage the porous pavement. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 19, 2016

DEC Issues Final Westward Waters Unit Management Plan

westward-waters-land-mapNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC)  has announced that the final Westward Waters Unit Management Plan (UMP) outlining the improved recreational access and the management of 13 state forests, seven parcels of detached Forest Preserve, eight Fishing Access Sites, and two Fisherman Parking Areas in Lewis County has been issued.

The Westward Waters Unit Management Area includes a Demonstration Area at the Lowville Office, the Otter Creek Horse Trail Complex, Lake Bonaparte and Eatonville campsites, and several fishing access sites, including Crystal Creek, Burdick’s Crossing, Castorland, Beeches Bridge, Lowville, Glenfield, Denley Dam, and Deer River. » Continue Reading.


Friday, December 16, 2016

New DEC Fish and Wildlife Director Named

DEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has appointed Anthony Wilkinson to head up its Division of Fish and Wildlife.

A press release from the agency described Wilkinson as “a seasoned conservation professional with 36 years of experience as a wildlife biologist, zoologist, and researcher.”

Anthony (Tony) Wilkinson has been appointed to head up the agency’s four Fish and Wildlife bureaus and more than 350 employees whose missions are to conserve, improve and protect New York’s natural resources. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 11, 2016

New Study Details Recreationists’ Harmful Effects On Wildlife

dog-black-birdNewly published research in the journal PLOS ONE by scientists at Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), Colorado State University (CSU), and University of California-Berkeley finds that human recreation activities in protected areas are impacting wildlife, and more often than not, in negative ways.

Nature-based, outdoor recreation is the most widespread human land use in protected areas and is permitted in more than 94 percent of parks and reserves globally. Inspiring an estimated eight billion visits per year to these areas, outdoor recreation is typically assumed to be compatible with conservation. Increasingly, however, negative effects of recreation on wildlife are being reported. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 8, 2016

DEC Summer Camp Registration Opens January 25th

DEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that online registration for the 2017 summer camp program will open January 25, 2017 at 10 am.  Applications will be submitted through the online registration program available through DEC’s summer camp website.

Now in its 70th year, the summer camp program offers week-long adventures in conservation education for children ages 11-17. DEC operates four residential camps for children: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County); and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County). All four camps offer programs for children aged 11-13, while Pack Forest hosts children aged 14-17 for six weeks and Camp Rushford offers two weeks of programs for children aged 14-17. The complete schedule of camp offerings is available on the summer camp’s website and the online registration program. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 10, 2016

Free Fishing Veterans Day in New York State

fishing pier at eighth lake campgroundLast year, New York State added President’s Weekend and Veterans Day to the existing June free fishing weekend, allowing guests and residents to enjoy angling on the any of the state’s numerous lakes, waters and streams.

Typically, a  one-day fishing license for New York State is $5 for residents, and $10 for non-residents – an inexpensive option for the infrequent angler. Other licensing options range from a full week to a year, and priced accordingly. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 20, 2016

Conservation Council Seeks Committee Applicants for 2017

nyscc-logoThe New York State Conservation Council (NYSCC) is seeking Committee applicants for 2017. NYSCC is the oldest conservation organization in New York State, comprised of volunteers who are concerned with sound management of the state’s and the nation’s land, water, fish and wildlife.

Members are involved in a variety of Council issues dealing with hunting, trapping and angling, and ranging from educating youth and adults, to legislation, and including projects such as cleaning up waterways and roadsides and habitat improvement for sportsmen and women. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Threatened Northern Sunfish Discovered In Clinton County

northern sunfish

In early September, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Rare Fish Unit Biologist Doug Carlson and technician Eric Maxwell identified nearly a dozen threatened northern sunfish in the Great Chazy River in the village of Champlain, Clinton County

Also known as the longear sunfish, the northern sunfish is a small, thin, deep-bodied fish that averages three to four inches in length. It is sometimes a colorful fish with an olive to rusty-brown back, bright orange belly, and blue-green bars on the side of the head. The northern sunfish has short, round pectoral fins and an upward-slanting gill cover flap that has a white and red flexible edge. It is often mistaken for a pumpkinseed sunfish. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 16, 2016

Comments Sought Champlain Basin Regulations

Lake-Champlain-BasinThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will hold two public information meetings and a public hearing in Plattsburgh on the proposed rulemaking to upgrade the classifications of certain surface waters within the Lake Champlain drainage basin.

The proposed rulemaking is to amend Part 830 of Title 6 of the Codes, Rules, and Regulations of the State of New York (6 NYCRR) to upgrade the classifications of certain surface waters in order to meet the “fishable” goal of the federal Clean Water Act.  In addition, some waters would be upgraded from “non-trout” to “trout” waters. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 4, 2016

Comments Sought On Changes to Fishing Regulations

DEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is accepting comments on proposed changes to freshwater fishing regulations through October 7, 2016.  DEC modifies freshwater sportfishing regulations approximately every two years.

The new freshwater sportfishing regulations are scheduled to take effect on April 1, 2017. Once enacted, the new regulations will be included in the 2017-18 Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guide.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, August 26, 2016

Adirondack Aquatic Invasives Program Administrator Sought

invcheckboatNew York State is seeking proposals for an entity to administer the Adirondack Park Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Spread Prevention Program. The program is expected to provide support to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species throughout Adirondacks through a network of boat stewards and decontamination stations.

With more than 2,300 lakes and ponds, 1,500 miles of rivers, and 30,000 miles of brooks and streams, the Adirondack region is particularly vulnerable to the introduction of AIS. Once established, species such as zebra mussels and Eurasian water milfoil can spread rapidly through connecting waterways or by “hitchhiking” on recreational boat equipment, including propellers, trailers, rudders, and motors. Strategically placed boat stewards will help prevent the spread of AIS by educating boaters on how to properly identify and remove AIS, and performing voluntary boat and equipment inspections. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 20, 2016

A Short History of The Beaver River Club

Joseph Dunbar’s Hotel at Stillwater, the original Clubhouse From its founding in 1893, and over the next 30 years, the Beaver River Club was the destination of many of the visitors to the Stillwater area.

It was the summer retreat of wealthy and influential families from Syracuse, Utica and to a lesser extent from throughout New York State. The decision to enlarge the Stillwater Dam and create today’s Stillwater Reservoir utterly destroyed this glittering outpost in the wild. Here is its story. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Understanding Adirondack Algae Blooms

algal bloomThe increase in temperatures and decreasing water levels in bodies of water are setting the stage for an increase in algal growth within our waterways. Littoral (nearshore) algal blooms are already visible, and Cyanobacteria (blue-green) algal blooms have recently closed down beaches in Lake Champlain.

Algae, the base of the aquatic food web is important to our aquatic ecosystems. They provide food for many organisms and create oxygen and shelter. Algae remove nutrients directly from the water column. If excessive nutrients enter our waterways, the nearshore algae will respond by blooming. The more nutrients that enter, the more algal growth there will be. Generally 1 pound of phosphorus will grow 500 pounds of wet algae. Phosphorus is not the only nutrient needed, nitrogen and carbon are needed to cause a bloom. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 2, 2016

2016-17 Sporting Licenses Now On Sale

DEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that sporting licenses and Deer Management Permits for the 2016-17 season are now on sale.

Licenses and permits can be purchased at any one of DEC’s license-issuing agents, in person, by telephone, or online. » Continue Reading.


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