Posts Tagged ‘Gardening’

Monday, June 22, 2015

Lake George Invasive Plant Trade-In June 29th

barberry.jpg(1)If you live in the Lake George watershed and you want a free native plant for your property, you can get one for free on Monday, June 29th.

There is, however, a catch: You must dig up one of the invasive plants on the list below from your property and bring it to the Lake George Association (LGA) to trade it in. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 10, 2015

June in the Garden: Transplants and Seedlings Care

SeedlingsJune is a critical time to get vegetable and flowers established. Whether planted as seeds or transplants, these young plants need some extra attention now to help them survive the rigors of summer.

Transplants go through a period of shock as they adjust to their new growing conditions. Bright sun, pounding rain and drying winds can all be a challenge for these tender plants. Their roots are limited to the container they were growing in but they need to reach far into the surrounding soil to seek out water and nutrients and to provide support to the plants as they become top-heavy. The important feeder roots grow horizontally through the soil where there is oxygen and lots of microbial activity, only a few roots grow down deep. To encourage that lateral growth keep the soil around the new plants moist and avoid letting it dry out. It should dry somewhat between waterings but for the first month, pamper these young plants with extra water during dry spells. By August they will be better able to withstand moderate droughts, but not now. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 5, 2015

Tips: Coping With Common June Garden Pests

k11094-1potatobeetleusdaPeggyGrebWhenever you have a few minutes, take the time to get up close to your plants. Turn the leaves over to look for eggs or newly hatching insects. Here are some insect pests that show up in gardens every June.

Colorado potato beetles (shown at left) love potatoes, of course, but their favorite crop of all is eggplant, which is related to potatoes. Luckily, they don’t have much appetite for tomatoes, another relative. The eggs are bright orange, about the size of a fat sesame seed and are laid in clusters of 8-12 on the undersides of the leaves. Crush and egg clusters you see. By crushing them now you prevent that whole generation from developing. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 28, 2015

Focus On Soil For Gardening Success

NRCS7028ScottBauerSoilHand300Nothing is more important to the success of any garden than the quality of the soil. Rarely is the soil in your yard ideal for growing flowers or vegetables without some amendments or improvements. In almost every situation, the best thing a gardener can do is add organic matter. Adding it just once won’t be enough. Try to add some kind of organic matter at least two or three times each year.

But what is ‘organic matter’? » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 28, 2015

Crazy Worms: Fish Bait And Forest Pest

Crazy WormRaise your hand if you’re tired of hearing about new invasive species. Yeah – right there with you. Aside from the fact that there’s too much bad news around as it is, we’re still working on a solution for those good old-fashioned pests that rival the common cold in terms of eluding conquest. Japanese beetles, European chafers, buckthorn, wild parsnip, Japanese knotweed – enough already. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Trees: Understanding Roots And Root Care

PaulHetzlerTreeRootAngelaPerry4002.5April showers bring May flowers, the calls of spring peeper frogs, and of course, backhoes. Yes, it’s construction season, which for arborists and trees is also root-damage season.

As far as trees are concerned, root injury is the source of all evil. Well, most of it, anyway; chainsaws and forest fires aren’t so kind to trees, either. But regardless of the worrisome signs a tree may develop, whether early fall leaf color, tip dieback, slow growth, or even some diseases and insect infestations, the problem is below ground in the majority of cases. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 17, 2015

Historic Local Apples Found In A New Book

adirondack appleEvery two years I gather together some friends to make hard cider. None of us have apple orchards. From the time the buds break throughout the summer, until after the first couple hard frosts, we scan the roads and fields of the Adirondacks. We look for abandoned orchards and clumps of neglected trees in yards and inquire with their owners.

Right up until the last gallon goes into the fermenter we have endless debates about the best way to pick our finds. We prattle on about the best timing, their sugar content, texture, and flavors.  Inevitably the question is raised: “well, what do you think it is?” Now, a new book has been published that we can turn to in trying to figure that out. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Perennial Sale, Shoreline Stewardship Fest in Lake George

014The Lake George Community Garden Club’s Annual Perennial Plant Sale will be held in Shepard Park, Lake George on Saturday, May 16th from 9 am until 2 pm in conjunction with the Fund for Lake George’s Stewardship with Style Festival on the same weekend, also in Shepard Park.

The annual Perennial Sale offers hundreds of high-quality perennial plants grown and dug from local zone 4 and 5 gardens. Garden Club members will be available to share planting instructions, tips for successful gardening, and other information. The sale will also include a tag sale and the sale of garden art objects created by Garden Club members. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Second Weekend of Saranac Lake’s Daffest

IMG_6423Spring is finally here and Saranac Lake has thousands of daffodils starting to bloom as proof. The first weekend of the springtime Daffest tradition flew by with its “Try Mine” Pastry contest and Daffest Derby race, and now the final weekend approaches and all sorts of spring activities are on the docket.

My family always enjoys this ritual of spring. Mud season is a tough time. We don’t want to damage the fragile hiking trails, but we still want to explore outside. An easy fix is walking through Saranac Lake Village to see all the daffodils just starting to bloom. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Arbor Day Has Northern New York Roots

SeedlingplantingUSDAForestServ3003.75Muskrat Day. Velcro Appreciation Month. Hair Follicle Hygiene Week. Arbor Day. You know it’s an obscure event when the greeting-card trade hasn’t bothered to capitalize on it. I like to think the industry knows Arbor Day is worthy of a Hallmark line, but that they’ve decided to honor its spirit by conserving paper. (C’mon, it’s possible.)

While it’s not the best-known observance, Arbor Day has a respectable history, as well as local roots. Begun in 1872 by Adams, NY (Jefferson County), native J. Sterling Morton, Arbor Day was intended to highlight the need to conserve topsoil and increase timber availability in his adopted state of Nebraska. Though it began as an American tradition, Arbor Day, which is observed on the last Friday in April, is now celebrated worldwide. » Continue Reading.


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