Posts Tagged ‘gender’

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Suffrage Movement’s Inez Milholland Centennial Update

Inez Milholland, 1913The campaign by the National Women’s History Project to honor Inez Milholland, America’s suffrage martyr, with the Presidential Citizen’s Medal is gaining ground. The medal, the second highest of civilian awards, recognizes Americans who have made significant contributions to the nation’s progress.

Citing her “vital” leadership in the suffrage movement, Congresswoman Jackie Speier (D-CA) nominated Milholland (1886-1916) for the presidential award and called Milholland “a shining star in the pantheon of inspiring leaders” in the early 20th century. Speier nominated Inez for the medal earlier in 2016. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 14, 2016

Equal Pay for Women in 1870: The Charley Warner Solution

1928 HdlineCWarner01Unequal pay for women ably performing the same jobs as men is unfair and idiotic. Why the sex of an employee reduces their pay should be a mystery to all, especially when most men can relate stories of male co-workers receiving equal pay despite being underperformers, shirkers, or just plain lazy. But the issue is nothing new. Faced with a need for self-supporting income in the 1870s, a northern New York woman didn’t wait for society to grant her equality. She instead chose her own path: going undercover in a man’s world. In doing so, she may have also found more happiness than anyone realized at the time. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Hallie Bond On Women, Boats, and Lake George

Women recreating on Lake George, circa 1917“As to ‘physical exertion,’ there is no such exertion known here. It is the laziest of all imaginable places.” So “Adirondack” Murray appealed directly to women, even those “fragile or delicate,” in his 1869 Adventures in the Wilderness.

In those decades after the Civil War, Murray was not alone in feeling that women — at least upper middle class city women — were delicate and fragile. Not only were they supposedly far less strong than men, but they were supposed to conserve what energy they had for the female functions. Bearing children and keeping a genteel home was her highest and best duty. She could breathe fresh air on gentle strolls, but that was about it for exercise.

As Murray pointed out, though, “tramping is unknown in this region. Wherever you wish to go, your guide paddles you.” The Adirondack region was ideal for women. They didn’t even have to walk to enjoy the scenery and breath healing “air odorous with the smell of pine and cedar and balsam.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 5, 2016

Inez Milholland Centennial Being Marked

Inez Milholland, 1913Plans are afoot to honor suffragist Inez Milholland on the centennial of her death while campaigning for Votes for Women. Milholland was the daughter of Lewis, NY native John Milholland, and is buried in the family plot in Lewis.

This year is the centennial of Milholland’s death in Los Angeles of exhaustion and pernicious anemia.  The loss of the charismatic 30-year-old New York attorney intensified women’s efforts for the ballot and led to the picketing of the White House in January 1917, considered among the most important activist efforts in the campaign to secure the vote for women. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Women of WWI Laid the Groundwork for Rosie the Riveter

WomenWWI AIn observing National Women’s History Month 2016 (March), the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) has adopted the theme, “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government.” Among the women specifically cited is Judy Hart (1941–present), whose 27-year career with the National Park Service included a stint as the first superintendent of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Park in Richmond, California, a facility she helped create.

As the NWHP notes, “over 9,000 Rosies have contributed their stories to the park, and more than 2,000 have donated their personal items and mementos.” It’s fortunate that the Rosies are so well represented, but unfortunate that their World War I counterparts, who laid the groundwork for the Rosie movement, are largely overlooked. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Vasectomy Day Advocates: ‘Get Whacked for Wildlife’

Get_Whacked_For_Wildlife_shirt_RM_Model_FPWC_1-scrIn honor of Friday’s World Vasectomy Day, the Center for Biological Diversity is encouraging men to “get whacked for wildlife” to highlight the pressure human population growth puts on wildlife and the role men can play in preventing unplanned pregnancies.

Men who pledge to get a vasectomy for World Vasectomy Day can get a free “Get Whacked for Wildlife” t-shirt featuring a polar bear carrying a pair of scissors on the front and text on the back that reads: “With more than 7 billion people, we’re crowding wildlife off the planet. Vasectomies help.” The Center is also planning to cover the costs for 20 vasectomies at two New York City clinics as part of World Vasectomy Day. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 16, 2015

Domestic Violence In The Adirondacks

Domestic-Violence-InfographicOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month a month dedicated to educating the public about the widespread problem of domestic violence which is estimated to affect one in four women in America.

Each year in New York State, police agencies receive over 400,000 calls to help victims of domestic violence. In 2014, the New York State Police from Troop B (which includes Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton and St. Lawrence counties) investigated a total of 2,378 domestic incidents. These incidents range from verbal arguments between parties, to assaults, strangulations, damaging of property, threats of harm, and child endangerment. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 22, 2015

Women’s Day Event in Au Sable Forks

IMG_9427This Saturday, June 27th, women and men will gather at The Tahawus Center in Au Sable Forks to help raise awareness of the challenges girls and women still face in their personal and professional lives.

“Holding up Half the Sky: Being a Woman in the North Country,” will begin  at 12:30 pm with a panel of local women, including an Adirondack author from Elizabethtown, a Lebanese American woman from Jay, a high school student from Upper Jay, and Lorraine Duvall of Keene. Members of the panel will provide historical perspective on their lives, and the challenges and advantages of being a woman in the North Country. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 15, 2015

Suffrage Leader Inez Milholland Lecture Tuesday

Inez Milholland leading the Suffrage Parade on March 3, 1913The Whallonsburg Grange Hall, together with Adirondack Architectural Heritage, will present “The Life and Times of Inez Milholland” with speaker Linda Lumsden on Tuesday, June 16 at 7:30 pm.

Inez Milholland was a leader in the fight for women’s suffrage, a labor lawyer, and passionate campaigner for the rights of women and children. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 31, 2015

The Last Campaign of Inez Milholland

Inez MilhollandHistorians warn us against falling into a trap called the retrospective fallacy, that is, assuming that whatever happened – the Confederacy was defeated, we survived the Great Depression without a revolution – was bound to happen.

When we succumb to that kind of thinking, we overlook the achievements and sacrifices of those who brought us safely to harbor. Among those is Adirondack legend and women’s rights advocate Inez Milholland. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 16, 2015

Rita LaBombard: A History of Giving

P1 RitaLabombardWomen’s History Month this year finds me pondering the death of an old friend back in early February. When I first saw her obituary, it struck me as a second major loss for my hometown in a very short time. You see, fire in mid-January destroyed much of the school I attended through ten grades. I was raised in Champlain, north of Plattsburgh and just a mile from the Canadian border. During those growing-up years it was a typical village, where most of us knew most of us in one way or another. For a century, St. Mary’s Academy was the heart and soul of the community. The fire’s toll was felt by many.

Just two weeks after the blaze came the death at age 90 of Rita LaBombard. Unlike the school fire, her passing received little media coverage other than an obituary of a few paragraphs. Yet her life may have affected in a positive way just as many people as the school did in 106 years. What she accomplished through a lifetime of giving really is amazing. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 15, 2015

Celebrating Adirondack Women

Anne LaBastille - SagamoreWomen’s History Month provides an opportunity to honor the women from the Adirondacks who have lived here, and those who have written about women who helped to preserve this special place and loved its many facets. A number of books have been published the last decade or so that chronicle the lives and stories of women who contributed to the history and culture of the Adirondacks.

“Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives” is the theme for the 2015 National Women’s History Month. Two women ingrained into the fabric of my Adirondack life are Anne LaBastille and Barbara McMartin. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Women’s History: Battling Bishop Doane

P1A WCDoane1896“Woman cannot do man’s work. There is not, in my opinion, any mental equality between the sexes…. Women are just as bright as men, but they are less logical, more moved by impulses and instincts…. Each sex must confine itself to certain sorts of occupation, men being unable to do much of women’s work, as women are unable to do much of men’s.”

What a great quotation to open with during Women’s History Month. As you may have guessed, those words were spoken long ago—1909, in fact. The statement alone was disturbing enough, even back then, but what made it worse was the source: not an illiterate, but one of the most powerful and influential men in upstate New York. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Remembering LGBTQ Activist Andrea Adams

Andrea AdamsAndrea Adams, founder and former director of The Bridge and a local LGBTQ activist, passed away peacefully at her home in South Glens Falls on January 22. Her loving partner Dennis Belden was by her side.

A memorial service was held on January 28 at Saint Andrew Lutheran Church in South Glens Falls, a welcoming congregation of which Andrea and Dennis were dedicated members. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Climbing Grace Peak In The Dix Range

GraceViewShortly after moving to the Adirondacks in 1996, I climbed Giant Mountain. Not only was it my first High Peak, it was the first time I’d climbed anything higher than the hill in the back yard where I grew up.

While incredibly rewarding, the hike was harder than I had imagined even though I was a fit, thirty-year-old marathon runner. It was humbling. Nevertheless, like many others before me, I was hooked on the Adirondack Mountains, and I wanted more.

That same year Grace Leach Hudowalski celebrated her ninetieth birthday, an occasion covered in the local papers. I’d never heard of Grace or the Adirondack Forty-Sixers, but I was smitten by the photo of her beaming with her birthday cake, proudly sporting her Forty-Sixer patch. » Continue Reading.


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