Posts Tagged ‘Heart Lake’

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Second Annual ADK Winterfest Saturday

AdkWinterfestLoj_newLast year my family attended the ADK Winterfest held at the Adirondack Mountain Club’s Adirondack Loj property and had a blast. We spend quite a bit of time at this “gateway to the Adirondacks,” but thought that ADK Winterfest was the perfect opportunity to introduce a one-stop venue of winter activities to our guests. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 22, 2014

Early Fall Foliage From Mount Jo

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The foliage around Heart Lake was showing about 25% color change this past weekend. The bright reds aren’t showing quite yet but spots of color are showing here and there. The next two weeks should be great for viewing fall colors.  Early mornings after cold nights are a good time to see the contrast between frosted peaks and fall colors in the valleys below.

Monday, February 24, 2014

Night Sky Over Heart Lake

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Last night was perfect for viewing the stars over large portions of the Adirondacks.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

ADK Winterfest and Winter Trails Day

ADKLojski_newMy family spends a fair bit of time at the Adirondack Mountain Club’s (ADK) Adirondack Loj High Peaks Information Center. With Heart Lake being a popular gateway into the High Peaks, we hike their trails, drop off groups and introduce guests to its range of outdoor activities.

Since the Adirondack Park is a multi-season playground, the ADK Heart Lake Center is offering a free day full of winter opportunities to showcase that the 700-acre Heart Lake property is more than just a parking lot for the High Peaks. In conjunction with the 19th Winter Trails Day, ADK has gathered volunteers and staff to host its first Winterfest on January 11. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 2, 2013

Brendan Wiltse: Ice Over on Heart Lake

BJW_3086Ice over is a true indicator that winter is here.  While not celebrated as greatly as ice-off, it is a delightful moment for those of us that enjoy the outdoor recreational opportunities that winter brings.  This photograph marks the first morning of significant ice cover on Heart Lake.  Let the winter season begin!


Friday, January 18, 2013

Programs Highlighting Sportsmen, Outdoors Enthusiasts

Two program series set to begin this month in Newcomb and Keene offer events for sportsmen and outdoor enthusiasts. The Adirondack Mountain Club’s 2013 Winter Lecture Series will take place at the High Peaks Information Center, while the Adirondack Interpretive Center (AIC), formerly the Newcomb VIC, will offer a variety of programs highlighting the role that sportsmen in the Adirondacks play in conservation and game management.

The AIC’s programs will begin on January 26, with a focus on white-tailed deer. Future AIC program topics will include trapping, and preparing, cooking and enjoying fresh game. This month’s program will be led by Jeremy Hurst, a certified wildlife biologist with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Hurst specializes in managing New York state’s big-game populations.
» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 30, 2012

Adirondack Wildlife: The Flying Squirrels

In the days prior to and immediately following a full moon, there is often enough light in the hours after sunset for a person to meander along a well established woodland trail without the aid of a flashlight. By walking slowly and quietly, one can occasionally detect a small gray squirrel rustling about the dead leaves on the forest floor, climbing up a large trunk, or moving along the limb of a tree. While most squirrels strongly prefer to be active during the light of day, the flying squirrel favors the darkness of night and is the most common nocturnal tree dwelling mammal within the Park.

The flying squirrel is characterized by a loose fold of skin, called a patagium that extends from it front and hind legs and connects to its sides. This thin, furry membrane acts as a wing or airfoil when the animal stretches its appendages outward and enables it to glide forward as it slowly descends after leaping from a tree. The wide and flat tail of this rodent provides additional lift and greatly helps an airborne individual alter its flight path so it can accurately land at a selected spot. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 28, 2011

ADK to Host Leave No Trace Traveling Team

The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) will host the Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers for awareness workshops and trailhead greetings on May 26-30.

Leave No Trace is a conservation movement that promotes sustainable outdoor recreational practices for the benefit of people and the natural environment. The Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers provide hands-on educational workshops and trainings across the country. Each presentation is unique, from an hour-long workshop to a two-day Leave No Trace Trainer Course. They work with a wide range of audiences, such as youth-serving organizations, college students, outdoor guides, park rangers and more.

Highlights of the Leave No Trace programs planned for the Adirondak Loj/Heart Lake Program Center include:

* Campfire Presentation (for campground and Loj guests) Friday, May 27, at 8 p.m.

* Trailhead Greetings (for hikers at the Loj trailhead) Saturday and Sunday, May 28 and 29, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The teams greet outdoor enthusiasts at popular trailheads and talk with them about Leave No Trace and the special concerns about the area they’re enjoying. The teams hand out free information and encourage visitors to practice Leave No Trace while they’re on the trail.

* Awareness Workshop (free and open to the public) Sunday, May 29, at 7 p.m. at the High Peaks Information Center. The teams conduct programs that may include a brief history of the Center for Outdoor Ethics organization, slideshows, games and information on how to become a Leave No Trace steward. The teams have conducted these types of trainings for retail store employees, visitors to national parks, youth organizations, university groups and others.

About the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics
The award-winning Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics is the international leader in sustainable recreation practices. The nonprofit organization teaches children and adults vital skills to minimize their impacts when they are outdoors. The center’s goal is to connect people to the natural world by providing tools and training to help them enjoy the natural world in an environmentally sustainable way. Leave No Trace is the most widely accepted outdoor ethics message used today on public lands across the nation by all types of outdoor recreationists. For more information about the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics or the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program visit www.LNT.org.


Tuesday, May 17, 2011

ADK Offers Backcountry Skills Programs

The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK), a national leader in outdoor education for nearly 90 years, is offering a full plate of programs and workshops in 2011 to help outdoor lovers hone their backcountry skills.

ADK’s workshops are designed to help participants explore the wonders of wild lakes and waterways, high alpine ridges, rugged backcountry wilderness and pristine forests while learning skills and ethics.

Most ADK outdoor workshops are based at the club’s Heart Lake Program Center in the Adirondack High Peaks region. A sampling of some of this year’s offerings is below, but a complete listing of ADK outdoor programs and workshops is available online.

Wildflower Weekend (May 21-22) Designed for beginner wildflower enthusiasts, but a good refresher course as well. This two-day program will familiarize participants with Adirondack wildflowers. The workshop will cover identification, use of field guides, botanical structures, relationships between plants and various environmental factors. Cost is $69 for ADK members and $76 for nonmembers.

American Canoe Association Instructor Certification Workshop (June 20-23) In addition to its introductory, one-day canoeing and kayaking courses (scheduled for June 4 and 5, respectively), ADK is offering this four-day program designed for outfitters, outdoor educators and experienced paddling enthusiasts. Refine paddling mechanics, hone rescue skills and develop teaching techniques. Cost is $375 for ADK members and $415 for nonmembers.

Beginner Backpacking: High Peaks Wilderness (July 8-10) Learn the tips and tricks of backpacking and low-impact camping with a New York State Licensed Guide. Spend three days and two nights in the High Peaks Wilderness and learn about proper gear, food planning and preparation, safety considerations, map reading, camp set-up, low-impact techniques, water treatment and more. Cost is $160 for ADK members and $176 for nonmembers.

Dog Days (Aug. 8-11) This four-day exploration and discovery program is designed for kids 8-12. Each day will feature fun educational activities using the woods and waters around the Adirondak Loj. Cost is $125 for ADK members and $138 for nonmembers.

Wilderness First Aid (Oct. 22-23) This intense Wilderness Medical Associates course teaches students how to deal with medical emergencies when they are miles from help. Cost is $235 for instruction and materials. A package including meals and two nights lodging is available for $320.

The Adirondack Mountain Club, founded in 1922, is the oldest and largest organization dedicated to the protection of New York’s Forest Preserve. ADK is a nonprofit membership organization that helps protect the Forest Preserve, state parks and other wild lands and waters through conservation and advocacy, environmental education and responsible recreation.


Thursday, February 3, 2011

ADK Hosts Family Snowshoe Day February 12th

The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) will host a Family Snowshoe Day on Saturday, Feb. 12. Participants will spend the day snowshoeing on the trails of ADK’s Heart Lake Property, just south of Lake Placid at the end of Adirondack Loj Road. The club will provide snowshoes and instruction for a guided hike around their property, as well as sharing bits of natural history including animal tracking and winter ecology. The program will run from 10 a.m. till 3 p.m.

The cost is $35 for adults and $12 for children 6-15 years old. Kids under 6 are free. For ADK members, the price is only $30 for adults and $10 for kids. Price includes parking at the Adirondak Loj.

For more information, contact ADK Outdoor Leadership Coordinator Ryan Doyle at (518) 523-3480 Ext. 19 or send him an e-mail at workshops@adk.org. For more information about ADK and its outdoor programs and workshops, visit their website.

The Adirondack Mountain Club, founded in 1922, is the oldest and largest organization dedicated to the protection of New York’s Forest Preserve. ADK is a nonprofit membership organization that helps protect the Forest Preserve, state parks and other wild lands and waters through conservation and advocacy, environmental education and responsible recreation.


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