Posts Tagged ‘Local Media’

Monday, June 19, 2006

Adirondack Media: The Glens Falls Post Star takes on WAMC – and loses

In a strangely foolish move two weeks ago (designed to make local Public Radio Station WAMC look bad?) the Warren County daily reported the following:

Warren County supervisors agreed Wednesday to spend $9,800 in occupancy tax funds for a year’s worth of advertising on WAMC/Northeast Public Radio. The money buys 52 weeks of “embedded” advertising during WAMC’s morning program, The Round Table. In addition to small announcements, discussion of the county and region is integrated into the commentary on the Round Table show, explained county Budget Officer Nicholas Caimano.

The Albany Eye (a one-man band blog, not a serious newspaper like the PS is supposed to be) was quick to point out that what the Post Star was saying was that Warren County was buying the right to content on WAMC’s regular morning show.

It sounds like this means that the county will get to place guests on the show where they’ll promote events and other Warren County tourism initiatives.

Well, that’s what it sounded like to us as well, and probably anyone else who bothered to pick up one of the Adirondack‘s worst run papers. But then, it turns out – surprise, surprise – that the Post Star got it all wrong because they didn’t bother to ask the folks at WAMC.

Worse yet, on Tuesday the paper’s Christine Margiotta passed the fault back to Caimano:

Warren County Budget Officer Nicholas Caimano drew sharp criticism Monday from WAMC/Northeast Public Radio over his description last week of an underwriting deal between the county and the radio station.

WAMC staff members said Caimano was out of line last week when he said Warren County‘s status as a station underwriter would buy “embedded” advertising and commentary on WAMC’s “The Round Table” morning show.

Susan Arbetter, co-host of The Round Table show, explained Monday that underwriters have no influence over the show’s content.

“WAMC and the Round Table never do quid pro quo,” she said. “We certainly sell underwriting but there is a firewall between the underwriting department and editorial at WAMC. It’s as sacred at WAMC as it is at any newspaper.”

Fine, but here’s the rub:

Caimano said Monday his lack of understanding led him to inaccurately characterize WAMC’s underwriting process to the county Board of Supervisors.

Ah… sure… but it was a lack of real journalism on the part of the Post Star that reported his false claim as fact and led them “to inaccurately characterize WAMC’s underwriting process to the county.”

True to form, the Glens Falls daily deceives and obfuscates, rather than simply admit its shortcomings when it’s wrong – nothing new there.


Monday, May 8, 2006

Some Posts From Around the Adirondack Region You May Not Have Seen

Over at jockeystreet we have a great post on the meaning of May 1st – that’s the original May 1st, not the jingoistic 1958 Cold War version that is dying a slow and deserving death in Glens Falls – apparently much to the dismay of the Glens Falls Post Star.

Speaking of the region’s worst daily – and we recently spoke with a long time VIP at the paper who completely agreed with that assessment. We wish we could say more about that but he asked us not to. Anyway, Matt is back with his Angry (and strikingly disturbing and truthy) Letters to the Editor which demonstrate the long held accusations of Matt’s. Apparently they are withholding and corrupting the news, printing painfully slanted rhetoric in place of the news, and, well, lying to their readers.

A nice comparison is to take a look at these two stories:

From the Post Star: DEC wins court decision stopping vehicle use on Adirondack roads (now that’s a headline – how the hell will we get to the grocery? or the pub?)

And from the North Country Gazette (now a one woman about to go under webzine): Horicon Loses Attempt to Lift ATV Ban

In other internet news – we have a bizarre thread on the need to carry guns while hiking. Forget the bears! Its the teenagers some are ready to shoot.

And there’s the local Wikipedia war with words!

While we’re going on about the new wonders of the internet – Metroland has a good read about the death of local music retailer The Music Shack – unfortunately the blame is all on us, has nothing to do with them:

For every music collector, record collector, appreciator of album covers and lover of lyric sheets, there is a careless bandit, an unemotional music drone, the one who downloads music willy-nilly, regardless of taste, ignoring the band’s history or influences, oblivious to the group’s importance and pedigree or lack thereof. These buyers are the ones who are giving Memorex, Dynex and Verbatim a boost in the piggy bank. They are the ones you see scooping the jumbo CD carrying cases off the shelves at Wal-Mart to fill with ugly, scribbled-on discs. They are the people who don’t recognize the album covers or know the track names of their favorite bands.

Metal fans are in a tizzy – where will they buy the latest Tool? Meanwhile, music is making real progress on an old front – connecting with the dramatic and awful things that are happening today. We give you:

The release of Bruce Springsteen’s cover of Pete Seeger tunes from Hudson Mohawk IMC
The release of Neil Young’s Living With War (with extra mp3 goodness for all you “unemotional music drones”) from Vermont’s False 45th Blog.

UPDATE #1 – 05/10/06: NCPR reports on calls to restrict ATV use by young children.

UPDATE #2 – O5/10/06: Forgot to mention a really great music blog agregator with plenty of great mp3 goodness – elbo.ws


Wednesday, January 25, 2006

In The Adirondacks Mining Accidents Once Occurred Regularly

According to the Associated Press the deadliest mining accident in American History was an explosion in a Monongah, West Virginia coal mine in 1907 in that killed 362 people.

Other recent mining accidents include:

2001: Explosions at a Jim Walter Resources Inc. mine in Brookwood, Ala., kill 13 people.

1992: A blast at a Southmountain Coal Co. mine in Norton, Va., kills eight.

1989: An explosion at a Pyro Mining Co. mine in Wheatcroft, Ky., kills 10.

1986: A coal pile collapses at Consolidation Coal Co.’s mine in Fairview, W.Va., killing five.

1984: A fire at Emery Mining Corp.’s mine in Orangeville, Utah, kills 27.

Here in the Adirondacks, mining accidents occurred with regular frequency in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Chateaugay Ore & Iron Company mines have claimed several men. William Otten was killed on March 13, 1928; later that year, 21-year-old Lyon Mountain miner Floyd Rounds was seriously injured when dust from an explosion was thrown into both his eyes.

Fred Brinks, an Englishman, was killed on July 9, 1927. Polish miner Aleksandra Dachkon was killed at the Lyon Mountain mines in 1920. Another Polish immigrant, Edward Suzbalia, a foreman and 18-year veteran of the Lyon Mountain mines fell into Number 11 Mine in 1909. He fell 200 feet landing on his head and died instantly leaving a wife and two children. “He was held in the highest esteem both by his superior officers,” the Plattsburgh Sentinel reported, “and the men with whom he worked and was considered one of the most careful and reliable men in the employ of the company.”

Three men were killed and one seriously injured in one terrible week in 1927. One was 50-year-old George Bouyea who fell 300 feet into a shaft at Lyon Mountain. The 18-year company veteran and foreman in charge of repairing motors was adjusting a cable at the top of a shaft when he lost his footing. He was instantly killed leaving a wife and seven children.

In 1907, five unnamed miners – “Polanders, and it was impossible to learn their names” – where injured when the roof of a mine at Lyon Mountain caved in. Two men broke their legs and the other three were less seriously wounded.

Foreign workers frequently went unnamed. “An Italian who was blown up at Tongue Mountain died Thursday,” one report noted. “He accidentally struck a stick of dynamite with a crowbar. The man’s left arm was blown off at the shoulder, there is a compound fracture of his right arm just above the hand, both eyes were blown out of his head, a stone was jammed against his heart and his head was bruised.” It was a remarkable that he wasn’t killed instantly.

Dynamite was the culprit in a fatal explosion at the Harmony Shaft in Mineville in Essex County in 1901. During the day shift a charge of dynamite had failed to explode. When the night crew came on, George Baker was informed about the unexploded charge and Baker, James Tate, and Thomas McClellan went to the spot to correct the situation. The blow of the tapping bar exploded the charge of dynamite and Tate’s head was blown off. Baker was blinded, his arm broken and his face badly injured. McClellan was seriously hurt. Baker lost an eye but he and McClellan recovered. Baker was troubled by what had happened. His wife went insane and was committed to a mental hospital in Ogdensburg. Baker started drinking heavily. In 1915, fourteen years after he the mine accident George Baker tried to kill himself with a shotgun. He overloaded the shells and the gun exploded – not to be deterred, he took up a razor and slit his own throat. He was just 45.

UPDATE 1/6/06: Brian Mann of North Country Public Radio (NCPR) interviewed Lawrence Gooley, Adirondack author of “Lyon Mountain: The Tragedy of a Mining Town” after reading about Adirondack mining accidents here at the Almanack. NCPR has set up a webpage where you can hear the interview here.

UPDATE 5/1/06: The Almanack is now an NCPR Featured Blog.


Suggested Reading

Lawrence Gooley’s History of the Lyon Mountain Mines


Friday, December 23, 2005

Need Something Worth Saying?

We’re on record regarding the inadequacy of our region’s media, but today just seems weird. First we have Rick Brockway, the Oneonta Star’s Outdoors Columnist, who gave us a strangely rambling an incoherent rant on, well, we guess it’s something along the lines of build more roads into the Adirondacks to protect them.

Here’s a gem of nonsense:

The Adirondack back-country was put out of reach for the majority of the people. The APA closed the wilderness lakes and ponds to aircraft. Float planes were prohibited from landing, thus making the only access into those areas by foot. I still backpack into that great land, but so many others can’t.

Today, the old growth forests are rotting away and falling down, and most of the lakes are dead or dying from acid rain.

There is no push to reclaim these areas, primarily because so few people use the land and water. Their faint voices are never heard.

Out of reach of most people? Maybe this outdoor columnist hasn’t been paying attention. Otherwise he might recall one recent controversy in the region – the overwhelming numbers of large hiking and camping parties, some arriving by Canadian buses, that led to restrictions on group size in the back-country. Forget about his amazing assertion that “the old growth forests are rotting away and falling down” – ah… yeah… where is that exactly?

Then there is a classic from none other than George Farwell, chairman and education program director of the Iroquois Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club in Utica. It seems that he is concerned, forget about the whole lot of more important issues on the Adirondack table, that people using the backcountry are relying on rescue services far too frequently. Hey we might even agree, but for this:

These “incidents” (not really accidents, as “accident” infers circumstances beyond one’s control), have become more commonplace.

Ahhh… they have? By what standard Mr. Farewell? A simple search of local newspapers reveals that Adirondack history is loaded with search and rescue operations, when the Adirondacks was a more remote place it was a lot easier to get lost or hurt. There were a lot more people in the region in the 19th and 20th centuries. Today there are a lot more search and rescue organizations, it’s highly doubtful there are more people getting into trouble in the woods. They’re just more widely reported.

When a coasting (sledding) accident happened in Keeseville one Thursday night in 1902 “Wilfred Graves, aged twenty-three years was almost instantly killed, and his sister Miss Rachel Graves, and Miss Edith Bulley were crushed so that it is feared they cannot recover. Among the others hurt were: Harry Miles, broken leg; John King, arm broken; George La Duke, arm dislocated.” It was no wonder the newspaper carried the headline “Frightful Coasting Accident.” Getting the seriously injured to a hospital in a timely manner in 1902 was all but impossible – not so today from even the most remote areas.

Travel over the ice in the days of fewer bridges meant for more accidents. Albert Rand with his wife and three children were crossing Lake George on the ice in February 1860 when their horse and sleigh “suddenly went through a crack in the ice” just a short distance from the shore. They cried out in vain for help as Rand struggled to drag himself onto good ice and then saved his wife and one of his children – the other two were drowned.

J. M. Riford, a merchant from Moriah in Essex County loaded his wife and their two children into their sleigh and set out to visit his father across Lake Champlain in Warren, Vermont on January 11, 1884.The family had a good team of horses and was expected to make the trip over in one day – they never arrived and were never heard from again. “Their friends fear that they are at the bottom of Lake Champlain or frozen to death
under the snow in the Green Mountains,” the New York Times reported.

These are just a couple of stories that indicate the kind of dangers people faced in the region, that they simply don’t face anymore. A little bit of research would easily dispel the myth that somehow the Adirondack region is a more dangerous place today. A short visit to the remaining (and recently reborn) stands of Old Growth would put an end to the notion that our forests are “rotting away.” We’re not saying the Adirondacks are not dangerous, they are, always have been. A little research, that’s all we ask from our local media, a little research, a little investigation.

The bottom line these days seems to be, if your beat is supposed to be the Adirondacks, if you can’t find a ship run-aground, and you can’t be bothered with the real issues like backhandedly opening the region to ATVs, or running your town like an old boys club, then just make something up – rotting ancient forest, silly people in the woods, whatever you like.


Tuesday, December 20, 2005

The War On Christmas

The War on Christmas has been funny, and sad, and it doesn’t even include the biggest threat to the Christmas Tradition as reported by the Washington Post:

This year has been one of the hottest on record, scientists in the United States and Britain reported yesterday, a finding that puts eight of the past 10 years at the top of the charts in terms of high temperatures.

Scientists said… that the world is experiencing serious climate change, driven in part by human activity. Researchers recently found by drilling ice cores that there is a higher concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than in any time in the last 650,000 years, which reflects that humans are burning an increased amount of fossil fuels to power automobiles and utilities.

It’s seems clear here at the Adirondack Almanack that the War of Christmas is a distraction from sinister attacks on American Civil Rights, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

An outrageous attack on civil liberties has occurred in Albany, where student activists are being watched by the our new secret police.

So let’s get this straight:

Secret Police
Secret Prisons
Torture

And now, another $453 Billion for the a war that “may never end,” not to mention the true cost of the war locally.

Say Merry Christmas! Or Else! You athiest commie hippie homo immigrant welfare mothers on drugs!


Friday, December 16, 2005

Historic Lake Placid Lodge Burns – Lost Hikers – Adirondack Brain Drain

Three items for your Adirondacks fix today:

Photos of the Adirondack Lodge fire from the Adirondack Daily Enterprise:

The resort was built in 1882 as a private residence. In the 1950s, he said, the residence became the Lake Placid Manor and was later renamed the Lake Placid Lodge. It is currently owned by David and Christie Garrett, who also own The Point, another resort lodge located on Upper
Saranac Lake.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Adirondackers Going Boldy to Port Henry on Lake Champlain

Students trying to get home from college after the fall of local Greyhound service have about as much chance as James Cawley of Ticonderoga has of getting his transporter to actually work. Wired magazine has a feature on Cawley, who lives in Ticonderoga and who has recently moved his exacting replica of Star Trek’s Enterprise from his grandfather’s garage to a old car dealership in Port Henry for the third installment (of an expected five episodes) of his fan film series New Voyages. And what a cast!

At the car dealership in upstate New York, [Walter] Koenig’s colleagues try to act like professional filmmakers and not gushing fanboys. As they eat pizza between takes, the actor [who played Chekov on the original series] regales them with stories about that scene-stealing jerk Shatner. But there’s an awed hush when he staggers onto the set as the rapidly aging Chekov to play his final scene. His skin is spotted, his hair nothing but a wisp. As the Enterprise navigator lies down in his quarters for one last rest, his captain comes to bid him farewell. “Who would have thought I would live so long,” Chekov wheezes, “in such a short time?”

Koenig has given James Cawley one piece of acting advice: Captain Kirk does not cry. But the cameraman is crying. The dolly grip is crying. The boom-mike operator is crying. And as he walks off the set, Jack Marshall’s face is streaked with tears.

Chekov is dead. Star Trek lives.

Further proof that what the Adirondacks needs is a focus on new media technology – a truly non-polluting growth industry.


Sunday, December 11, 2005

Adirondack Wilderness vs. Adirondack History?

The Glens Falls Post Star today is telling us all about Earl Allen, who (according to the photo cutline) “owns more than 200 acres in the Adirondack Park and has fought with the state to keep every bit of it.” Apparently in newspeak when you’re asked to sell your two and one half acre piece of land in the middle of the wilderness area to the state for the enjoyment of all New Yorkers, you are fighting the state to keep your more than 200 acres of land.

It’s no surprise that the Post Star panders to the right wing anti-Adirondack Park types. There used to be a William “Bill” Doolittle (the Will Doolittle of the Post Star or his father? Not that Will Doolittle) who was a one-time publisher of the Adirondack Daily Enterprise and former President of the Saranac Lake Chamber of Commerce. He moved from New Jersey and then outwardly positioned his paper to support the radical right “natives vs the state” mentality – he even suggested the hands across the mountains emblem for the developer front-group League for Adirondack Citizens’ Rights (now long defunct) and suggested to them that they make connections between their fight to eliminate environmental protection of the Adirondacks to the Patriot cause in the American Revolution.

Three items in the Post Star article bothered us here at the Almanack:

“One Johnsburg town official, who requested his name be withheld for fear of retribution, likened state land to cancer.” Apparently, in Johnsburg you can get elected by lying to your constituents, or at least keeping them from the truth of your views.

” ‘I wouldn’t give the state nothing,’ [Allen] said sharply during an interview earlier this month, his 80-year-old hand balling into a fist on his dining room table. ” Now we can guess that Mr. Allen doesn’t really mean that he “wouldn’t give the state nothing,” what he really means is that if it’s his private preserve, surrounded by state forest, he’s not going to give it up. We assume he doesn’t mean that he wouldn’t serve his country in time of war, or send his children or grandchildren to do the same. We assume that even though the state no doubt gives plenty to him and his town (which has just received nearly a million dollars in tax dollars for development), he certainly can not be drawing Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid, sending his kids to public schools, or driving on state or county roads – can he? When he is ready to leave this world he’s not going to ride in a partially state funded Johnsburg ambulance – is he?

Now for the funny part. Here’s a couple of gems:

It seems Mr. Allen is “still bitter about the burning” of Fox Lair, a resort for the rich that was turned into a rich boys summer camp until it was burned to the ground when the state purchased the land in the 1970s. Mr. Allen – It’s our land! We own it! You don’t want to sell yours and we wanted to clear the rich kids camp off ours! Maybe you should apply your property rights to someone besides yourself.

“You can drive anywhere in the state, anywhere in the park and not have any recollection of what was there 100 years ago in some places,” J.R. Risley, the Town Supervisor of Inlet, said. Ohhh… Mr. Risley we support your newfound devotion to historic preservation! That’s why environmentalist want to see wilderness instead of New Jersey-style development!

The problem is that you want to return to a time when the developers (Railroads, Tanning, Mining, and Lumber firms) took advantage of their friends in the State Legislature to clear-cut, cause devastating fires, and horrific depletion of topsoil, dams that flooded farmland and villages alike. The problem is, Mr. Allen and Mr. Risley – you don’t know your history!

So – here we are to give you some details:

Army archaeologists discovering history at Fort Drum:

Army archaeologists already have identified a major Iroquois village in the middle of the post with dozens of lesser sites scattered around the installation. Rush said nearly 200 significant sites have been located on post. Among them: Near the boat-building site, Rush and her colleagues have marked out a 5,000-year-old Indian village.

100 years indeed.


Friday, December 9, 2005

The Adirondack’s TV-8 is Going Bananas

We always thought it strange that Glens Falls’ newly relocated TV-8 (they moved this year from their old and grimy digs on Quaker Road in Queensbury to a new spot Downtown) was run by both Jesse Jackson (not that Jesse) and Michael Collins (not that Michael).

Newly arrived co-owner Jackson, who has been presented by local media as a TV programming executive from the big city who worked with the History Channel and VH1, turns out to have been a local ad man who went south when his firm went under and got a job in marketing.

By now you may have heard of the great banana crime spree that required a Hudson Falls crime stopper to draw his gun. “Oh my God, don’t shoot the banana,” Mechanic Street resident Steven Wilson said. What you probably don’t know is that with violent plushy crime way up, even giant chickens are going into hiding.

Ever wonder about your plushie fantasies? According to Gus Sheridan:

As a group, plushies are sexually oriented towards soft fuzzy things (living or otherwise, real or otherwise), but this can lead to practices ranging from a mere erotic interest in stuffed toys to using said toys as sexual aids to actually wanting to be a stuffed toy. You ever think maybe Chip & Dale were gay? You wonder what it would be like to see them copulate? Would you like to be one of them? Then you might be a plushie.

The extremists of this group actually wear soft costumes (akin to Barney, Grimace, or the life-size characters at Disneyland) and engages in sexual conduct with similarly-attired partners. The action might not be penetrative (at least in the traditional sense), but it’s fun for them.

This costume business comes in varying flavors and intensities as well. Dollies, instead of attiring themselves as some sort of real or fantasy version of an animal, gad about in getups that make them resemble Raggedy Ann, Strawberry Shortcake, or some other sort of doll.

Hensons take the practice into the SM realm by adding explicit elements of domination and submission play to the mix, as well as physical penetration in an attempt to mimic puppetry. In short, Hensons get into the kind of behavior immortalized in William Friedkin’s 1980 film Cruising. ‘Nuff said.


Friday, November 25, 2005

From the Lake George and the Adirondacks to the World – Rachael Ray

Announcing… AskMen.Com’s model of the month – Rachael Ray


Thursday, November 3, 2005

At Your Fingertips: Great Adirondack History Search Tools

Google Print is finally here. It joins the Listing of Oldest and Rarest [Adirondack] Books, the Adirondack Chronology [pdf], Northern New York Historical Newspapers, the Southern Adirondack Library System’s access to Heritage Quest, Making of America, and the Harper’s Magazine Search in the really cool free Adirondack historic resources department.

A few of the gems from Google Print:

Charles Zinser’s The Economic Impact of the Adirondack Park Private Land Use and Development Plan

White and Beal, Acid Rain: The Relationship between Sources and Receptors (Excerpt)

Benson Lossing’s The Empire State: A Compendious History of the Commonwealth of New York

Jacob A. Riis’s Theodore Roosevelt the Citizen

From Lifehacker:

To search books that mention the printing press in the public domain in the U.S., search for: "printing press" date:1500-1923

International books in the public domain can be searched like so:

"printing press" date:1500-1846


Suggested Reading

The Adirondacks: A History of America’s First Wilderness


Sunday, October 30, 2005

Internet Stuff Sunday – Interesting and Bizarre

Vermont’s Diabologue recently had an interesting reminescence on the early days of the Internet. Say What? has added their own memories of the Commodore 64.

Some folks over at the BlueMoo.net Adirondack community board are worried about their kids holding their breath… yeah… big danger there.

And why we’re on Adirondack community boards, the amazingly dull Adirondacks Live Journal is looking for a new moderator.

In case you missed it… the Queensbury Pagan Day apparently rocked and people are surfing the St. Lawrence!

Oh yeah… got junk mail problems? Think of the fun you can have with this.


Friday, October 28, 2005

They Come and They Go

There has been quite a turnover of bloggers recently. Gen X at 40 reports “Ray quit blogging yesterday and is released from the burden.” And sadly Democracy in Albany is reporting their “imminent retirement. At the very least I’m taking a sabbatical (at least 3 months).” This following their being voted Metroland’s Best Blog (News) this past year:

Despite all of the you-scratch-my-back attention heaped on certain blogs by local media (i.e., the Times Union’s oft-requited love for the schizophrenic Albany Eye blog), the author of DIA has managed to make his Internet soapbox into the most consistent and insightful forum on the Web for discussing the issues affecting the Capital Region. DIA and its legion of regular commenters succeed where their counterparts fail: welcoming debate on entries, encouraging the spread of information, casting a wide-reaching, critical eye on local media (including Metroland, of course) and generally providing a great online clearinghouse for all things regional and political.

Even our beloved Newsbreakers Blog seems to have been abandoned; as has apparently the Newsbreakers Parent Site.

They Join:

Mike Beganyi
Greg Dennis: Between The Lines
The WAMC Northeast Pirate Network
Albany Eye.Net
Where’s Orwell
The WFP (Working Family Party) Blog
DoctorAlbany
Culture’s Anecdote
The Unknown Prosecutor

They come and they go. New regional blog additions include:

Out Of My Head
Stacie’s Blog

And it looks like Take Back Our Campus is Coming Back, at least we hope so.


Thursday, October 6, 2005

Vermont’s International Film Festival

Get over to Burlington and see Vermont’s International Film Festival, now celebrating its 16th year! It runs October 13 to 16.


Monday, September 12, 2005

Glens Falls Mayoral Debate Tonight

In case you missed it, the Fairly Young Contrarian reports on the latest on the Glens Falls Post Star attempt to keep the right in power in the Southern Adirondacks. Enrolled Independents, Working Family Party members, Libertarians, Greens, and Democrats outnumber Republicans and Conservatives in Glens Falls [pdf]. Saratoga is on the verge of tipping to the left and the last two elections have only been won by right-wing operatives denying the vote to those in the traditionally left-leaning wards [second story down]. As more and more of the creative class move into Saratoga (and eventually Glens Falls only 15 minutes north) there will be a swing to the left – and there’s nothing those tight-asses at the Post Star and Saratogian can do about it. The question is – are they soul-less fools who will change their tune when the shift happens? Or do they have a backbone and will simply go out of business? Our guess – soul-less fools.


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