Posts Tagged ‘Moose’

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Learning Moose at Great Adirondack Moose Festival

Though Brenda Valentine, President of the Indian Lake Community Development Corporation, founded Indian Lake’s Great Adirondack Moose Festival, she has still yet to see a live moose. Though some visitors and locals have been fortunate to see the elusive animal, Valentine is patiently waiting for a glimpse of the largest member of the deer family. Until that time Valentine and the rest of the committee continues to provide a weekend full of fun during the Great Adirondack Moose Festival.

“The Great Adirondack Moose Festival first took place in 2010,” says Valentine. “We looked around at how other moose festivals were organized and discovered the closest one to our area was Talkeetna, Alaska. We asked visitors what they would like to do and we listened.” » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 18, 2017

A Celebration of Adirondack Moose

Moose At Helldiver Pond There are several creatures that serve as symbols of the rugged and majestic character of the Great North Woods, yet none is as fitting as the moose. When initially seen, a moose may be perceived as being quite ugly and an unusual choice to represent the beauty of the northern wilderness.

Its disproportionately long legs, awkward gait, protruding hump on its back above its shoulders, rather rough coat and odd looking facial features create an image that may not be very appealing at first glance. Yet, together these characteristics create a unique and overwhelming image to those lucky enough to see one of these giants in the wilds, and they help this massive mammal flourish in a sub-arctic region. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 6, 2017

8th Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival September 23-24th

Bruce, Smokey MooseThe 8th Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival will be held in Indian Lake during the weekend of September 23 and 24, 2017. Moose-themed family fun activities will be the main attraction.

Visitors to Indian Lake will enjoy programs, games, contests, exhibitions, many in the name of the elusive and majestic moose. The half-ton mammal has made a come-back in the Adirondacks, and one may even spot a moose during the Festival weekend. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 23, 2016

Great Adirondack Moose Festival This Weekend

mooseThe 7th Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival will take place this weekend, September 24th and 25th, in Indian Lake. Moose-themed family fun activities will be the main attraction during the weekend.

Visitors to Indian Lake can enjoy programs, games, contests, exhibitions – all in the name of the elusive and majestic moose. The half-ton mammal has made a come-back in the Adirondacks, and one may even spot a moose during the Festival weekend. The Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival (GAMF) is sponsored by the Indian Lake Chamber of Commerce and a host of regional and local business sponsors. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 26, 2016

Moose Inspires Adirondacks To Algonquin Park Trail

MooseThe two-year journey of a 700-pound moose named Alice has inspired plans for a long-distance trail that would connect the Adirondacks to Ontario’s Algonquin Provincial Park.

The Algonquin to Adirondacks (A2A) Trail would combine existing hiking trails, rail trails, main roads, and back roads to create a four hundred-mile route bridging the two parks. While conceived as a hiking path, options for bicycles and even paddlers are also under consideration. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Two Adirondack Moose Killed By Motor Vehicles

Moose cow and calf photo by the late Dennis Aprill, courtesy Adirondack Moose Festival, Indian Lake. A pair of Adirondack moose were killed in separate motor vehicle accidents Friday night.

The first incident occurred at about 8:30 p.m. on state Route 30, just north of the Meacham Lake Outlet. According to a state Department of Environmental Conservation statement, a female yearling moose was struck by an unknown vehicle.

An environmental conservation police officer and a state police trooper responded to the scene and found the dead moose, according to the DEC. The officers reported seeing an adult moose standing in the nearby wetland. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 26, 2016

Lost Brook Dispatches: Moose, Part Twose

Moose At Helldiver Pond by John Warren(This letter to my father-in-law is a follow-on to my column “You Moose Be Kidding”

Dear Howard:

I’m thinking of you, stuck in your hospital bed, red-legged and bored to death.  I sympathize, but I am very happy that you are where you are, remembering as I do my son Zach’s bout with cellulitis in the Blue Ridge Wilderness some years ago.   Cellulitis is a very serious thing and I’m glad you are out of danger.

Still, boredom is its own danger too, potentially injurious to your most excellent mental make-up.  So I thought I’d entertain you with some wonderful news.  Of course, this may not be news you want to hear, as it forces upon you a terrible choice: either accept the demise of your bothersome claim there are no moose in the Adirondacks (because you haven’t seen one); or instead accuse your own beautiful daughter, your precious flesh and blood, of being a bald-faced liar. For indeed, glory has been visited upon us!  Oh hail the great hand of fate that has delivered unto us a primary source to quiet you once and for all: last Friday we saw a moose! » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 7, 2016

How A Warm Winter Impacts Local Wildlife

20160104_tdpt_decDuring a mild winter in our northern forests, there are those of us who cheer our lower heating bills and those who scan the forecast, hoping for cold and snow. In a classic El Niño year like this one, when we often get unseasonably mild weather well into February, there are winners and losers in the natural world, too.

El Niño refers to a natural warming of Pacific waters. This phenomenon occurs every three to seven years, when prevailing trade winds, which drive the direction and force of ocean currents, slow down. As a result, cold water from the depths doesn’t get mixed with surface water, the ocean’s surface temperature rises, and global weather patterns can be altered. This year’s strong El Niño is being complemented by a low pressure system in the far north – called the Arctic oscillation – that’s keeping polar air trapped around the North Pole. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 23, 2015

Be Alert For Wildlife In The Roadway

deer in the roadThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) are urging motorists to be alert for moose, deer, and other wildlife on the roads.

Fall is the peak time for wildlife activity in northern New York. Additionally, two-thirds of all deer and vehicle collisions occur during October, November, and December, when deer breed and travel the most. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 15, 2015

Moose Study Underway: Report Your Sightings

unnamedA multi-year research project is underway to obtain information on the status of New York State’s moose population and the factors that influence moose survival and reproductive rate.

The goal of the Adirondack moose study is to gather data that will be used to create a moose management plan for New York State. The researchers are seeking the public’s help in reporting moose sightings in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 25, 2015

A Celebration of Adirondack Moose This Weekend

Moose At Helldiver Pond by John WarrenThere are several creatures that serve as symbols of the rugged and majestic character of the Great North Woods, yet none is as fitting as the moose. At first sight, a moose may seem quite ugly and an unusual choice to represent the beauty of the northern wilderness.

Its disproportionately long legs, awkward gait, protruding hump on its back above its shoulders, rather rough coat and odd looking facial features may not be very appealing. Yet, together these characteristics create a unique and overwhelming image to those lucky enough to see one of these giants in the wilds, and they help this massive mammal flourish in a sub-arctic region. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

Climate Change Threatens Adirondack Boreal Species

Tabor-moose-600x438On a warm day in June, state wildlife biologist Ben Tabor knelt in a dark forest in the northern Adirondacks, peering through his binoculars at a dark shape a few hundred feet away that he suspected was a moose with a GPS collar. After a few minutes, he moved forward for a closer look. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Great Adirondack Moose Festival Sept 26-27

IMG_4330 - Version 2 The 6th Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival, New York State’s first ever moose-themed fete,will be held in Indian Lake, N.Y., September 26 and 27, 2015.

Moose-themed programs, games, contests, and exhibitions will be the main attraction during the weekend. The half-ton mammal has made a come-back in the Adirondacks, and several are known to be living in the Indian Lake area.  » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 6, 2015

Adirondack Moose Population Showing Positive Signs

July 2012 at Helldiver Pond, Moose River Plains (Linda Bohrer Erion photo)The Adirondack moose population appears to be healthy and growing, according to early indications from a moose study currently taking place.

“We don’t know how many moose we have yet. We don’t know how frequent the moose are on the landscape. We don’t know their densities,” said Ben Tabor, a wildlife biologist with the state Department of Environmental Conservation. “What we do know is that our moose seem to be bigger and healthier than New Hampshire’s and Maine’s.” » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 3, 2015

How Wildlife Are Affected By Intense Cold

February 15 2015 Extreme ColdIntense cold is hard on all forms of wildlife, however, some of nature’s creatures are better adapted to deal with this type of adversity than others. Those animals whose geographic range extends well northward into Canada and Alaska have evolved various strategies to cope with prolonged bouts of sub-arctic weather and are quite capable of surviving the unrelenting cold that the Adirondacks has experienced this winter.

Conversely, some components of the Park’s fauna are on the northern fringe of their range and are better suited for functioning in a temperate region, such as southern New York and the mid-Atlantic States. These creatures are probably not faring well this season. » Continue Reading.


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