Thursday, November 23, 2017

Ski Season Gets Underway in the Adirondacks

whiteface opening dayRecord high temperatures settled in for the first half of the autumn season, but they have dropped and snowmaking crews made use of recent New York State investments in snowmaking to open state facilities ahead of schedule. Gore and Whiteface Mountains began the 2017-2018 season last Saturday, a week earlier than originally planned. The Mt. Van Hoevenberg Cross Country Ski Center opens Friday, November 24.

Trail volunteers have been working to clear ski the region’s trails and a few early cross-country tracks were made on the smoother terrain in the Tri-lakes this week. There was about 5 inches of snow at the Paul Smith’s College VIC on Tuesday, and there has been some early skiing at the golf courses around the Tri-Lakes, but conditions will be weather dependent over the next few days. A chance of snow showers are in the forecast for the weekend.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 23, 2017

Current Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (Nov 23)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Practice Leave No Trace Principles when visiting the Adirondack Park.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 23, 2017

Artisan Fair Saturday at The Wild Center

On Saturday, November 25th from 10 am to 5 pm, The Wild Center in Tupper Lake will host an Artisan Fair, and offer a discounted admission of $5.

A Trunk Show of local Adirondack Artisans will fill the Center, showcasing local artists, jewelry makers, knitters, leather goods makers, Adirondack frames and photographs and more. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 23, 2017

Christmas Comes Early in the Central Adirondacks

It’s a Turkey Trot here and a Turkey Trot there, but in the Central Adirondacks Santa and Mrs. Claus make it all about shopping local. Long before Small Business Saturday, Old Forge and Inlet’s Christmas on Main and Indian Lake’s A Country Christmas Tour provided a Thanksgiving holiday celebrating its unique Adirondack shops as well as a weekend of family-friendly activities.

According to Mike Farmer, Director of Publicity for the Town of Webb, there are a couple of big additions to Old Forge’s already packed schedule of events. If children forget to make their Christmas list, there are two red mailboxes, one at the Webb Visitor’s Center and another at Pointe Park, at the ready. Postcards are also on hand to jot down any last minute ideas. The Central Adirondacks Association purchased and renovated an old-fashioned sleigh so Santa will be arriving in style. For the first year, 60 area businesses contributed items for a holiday raffle basket. Shoppers spending $10 or more in participating stores will receive a ticket for a chance to win gifts ranging from motel stays to whitetail deer antlers. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Thanks For Giving

If the Pilgrims had only known what a big deal Thanksgiving was going to become in America they would undoubtedly have taken some pictures. Even the menu has been lost to us, although Wampanoag oral history, plus a few Pilgrim grocery receipts found at archeological sites, suggest there was corn, beans and squash as well as fowl and venison. Beyond that there may have been chestnuts, sun chokes (“Jerusalem” artichokes), cranberries and a variety of seafood.

Many historians believe the Pilgrims would have all perished during the winter of 1620 if not for food provided by the Wampanoags, whose land they appropriated. In the spring of 1621, Wampanoags gave the Pilgrims crop seeds, as well as a tutorial (possibly an App; we can’t be sure) on the production, storage and preservation of food crops such as corn, beans, and squash. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 22, 2017

View: Winter Exhibition, Opening Reception

view winter opening exhibitView, a multi-arts center located in Old Forge, will be celebrating its new winter exhibition with an opening reception on Friday, December 1st, 2017 from 5 to 7 pm. The reception is free and open to the public.

Two of the featured exhibits are Wood Transformed, Near & Far and Landscape Paintings by Stephen Horne. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Photo Contest Looking For Winter Scenes

Just when we thought we were destined for another warm winter, we’ve gotten some snow — and ice. Perfect timing for the Adirondack Explorer’s next Views of the Park photo contest. We’re looking for your photos of winter scenes in the Adirondacks.

Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix  » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Lumber Camp Cook Adolphus Bouvia’s 1909 Murder

A century ago, it was common during the Christmas holidays for North Country lumber camps to empty, at least briefly. In 1909, in far northeastern New York, the men of Altona in Clinton County enjoyed a welcome break after several weeks in the woods.

Near the settlement of Purdy’s Mills, the camp cook, Adolphus Bouvia, closed down operations on December 23. Widowed a year earlier, he planned to return home and spend time with family, friends, and neighbors, some of whom worked with him on the lumber jobs. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Stuff the Turkey, Not the Trash: Reducing Food Waste

Millions of pounds of leftover food is thrown away every year.

In 20916, the Natural Resources Defense Council estimated that Americans throw away 204 million pounds of turkey meat during the Thanksgiving holiday.

Here are some tips to reduce wasted food this holiday season: » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Saranac Lake Region Branding Survey Underway

saranac lake tourism logoThe Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST), in cooperation with the greater Saranac Lake community, is engaged in a branding study, and is looking for stakeholders, residents, and visitors to complete an online branding survey.

“The answers will help identify a cohesive, unified brand for the Saranac Lake region,” ROOST’s Saranac Lake Regional Marketing Manager Kelly Brunette said in an announcement to the press. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 20, 2017

Gibson: Boreal Road Construction Skirts Law

DEC and APA Staff Visit Jordan River in 2001 (Dave Gibson Photo)Previously I wrote in the Almanack about “a notice for public comment about what seems a relatively innocuous, relatively short (1.25 mile) road construction… has been circulated by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, or DEC… This is actually not a small deal at all.”

Indeed it is not a small deal. I wanted to follow up my earlier post with one that examines whether the State DEC has properly applied the law in its initial review of this project affecting more than 20,000 acres of private land easement, as well as State Land near the border of St. Lawrence and Franklin Counties. All of this area is part of a low-elevation boreal ecosystem identified for its significance by State and private ecologists since the 1970s. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 20, 2017

LGLC Receives Grant from TNC, Dome Island Committee

lglc logoThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) has received a grant of $10,000 from The Nature Conservancy via its Dome Island Endowment, in support of the stewardship of Dome Island and other lands in the Lake George watershed.

The Nature Conservancy’s Dome Island Committee meets several times a year to review projects funded by past grants and advise future spending. Funds are sourced from an endowment that was created before John Apperson donated the 16-acre Dome Island in Bolton to The Nature Conservancy in 1956. John Apperson challenged The Nature Conservancy and the Lake George community to raise a $20,000 endowment to support stewardship of the property, which was to be protected in perpetuity.   » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 20, 2017

New Aaron Woolf Film Being Shown in Lake Placid

david and jack hallquist The fall season of the Adirondack Film Society extends into December with a new documentary by Aaron Woolf, best known in the region as the former Democratic Party candidate for Congress who was defeated by Republican Elise Stefanik in 2014.

Outside the region, Woolf is known as a filmmaker, most notably for his documentary about agribusiness, King Corn (2007) His newest documentary is Denial, about gender transition, renewable energy and climate change. Denial follows Vermont electric utility CEO David Hallquist as his company struggles with generating and delivering electricity in the face of climate change. In the process, David Hallquist reveals to his family a lifelong dream to transition to Christine Hallquist.  Hallquist’s son Derek directed the film with Woolf serving as one of the film’s producers, writers and co-creators. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 19, 2017

Coyotes Prepare for Winter

coyoteEight years ago, my husband and I planted 128 fruit trees on a hillside, mostly apples, but the back few rows included stone fruits. Our apples began producing with gusto after only a few years. We made gallons of cider and sold bushels of heirloom apples. But the plums have required patience. Their blossoms are so delicate and our springs so unpredictable that after eight years, there are still varieties we have yet to taste.

Over these eight years, we have been loyal. We have not eaten anyone else’s plums. This year, we were rewarded when all five of our small Stanley plum trees produced dark blue fruit. By the end of September, they had almost ripened. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 19, 2017

Marcescence: An Ecological Mystery

Young beech trees retain their leaves throughout the winter monthsWe’re blessed to live in an area that offers some of the most beautiful fall foliage found anywhere in the world. And this fall proved to be one of the most remarkably enduring that I’ve ever experienced; the maples, birches, poplars, oaks, and beeches creating a landscape literally exploding in shades of gold, crimson, and orange, which lasted for several weeks.

As cold weather approaches, many species of trees shed their leaves as a strategy to reduce water loss and frost damage. Triggered by hormone change (the balance of auxin levels between leaves and branches), it’s all part of an important and complicated process known as abscission; in which trees seal off the point where the leaf petiole connects to the twig (the abscission layer). » Continue Reading.


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