Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Snow Shoveling Do’s and Don’ts

Phillip Bridges shovels the driveway of his new home Winter has arrived in the North County, and the snow will not be leaving us anytime soon. Not everyone has access to plows or snow blowers, which leaves us with one last snow removal tool, the shovel. Shoveling snow can be a physically intensive activity, and should be treated as one. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in 2015, more than 158,000 people were treated in an emergency room, doctor’s office, and clinics for injuries that happened while removing snow or ice manually. In order to prevent these types of injuries, you can follow some of these steps. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 18, 2018

New Maple, Birch Tapping Research Released

march maple tappingThe Northern New York Agricultural Development Program has posted a research update with data to help maple and birch syrup producers respond to variable climate conditions.

The project has established baseline data for what are hoped to be continuing efforts to determine the optimal time to begin tapping birch trees in conjunction with maple production. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Call for Artists: Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts

Blue Mountain Lake Arts CenterThe Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts (Arts Center) has announced they are seeking artists to exhibit in their three galleries in mid-April through December 2019. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 17, 2018

American Mountain Ash

mountain ash There’s a giant living in Coös County, New Hampshire. It’s a 61-foot tall tree, the country’s largest known American mountain ash. At last measurement, it stood at a height of 61 feet and had a circumference of 70 inches. That’s outstanding for a tree that’s described by most sources, including my old dendrology textbook, as “a small tree or shrub.”

This tree is a champion — but the species as a whole has a lot going for it. I love the mountain ash for the beauty of its white flower clusters and red berries. More importantly, though, it fills an important spot on the menu for birds and mammals, especially in winter. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 17, 2018

Poinsettias Have a Long and Colorful History

PoinsettiasPoinsettias are among the most popular potted flowering or foliage plants of the Christmas Season. They have been for decades. According to the most recent United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) statistics available, the wholesale value of U.S. grown poinsettias was roughly $140 million in 2015; $143.7 million in 2014. (By comparison, the 2015 wholesale value of orchids was about $288.3 million; chrysanthemums, $16.7 million; Easter lilies, $24.3 million.)

Long-recognized as the largest and most successful poinsettia breeder in the world, Paul Ecke Ranch in Encinitas, California was founded in 1924, by German immigrant entrepreneurs who moved to the US in 1902. For three generations, the Ecke family grew and sold poinsettias; first as field-grown landscape and mother plants and as cut flowers and, eventually, as greenhouse-grown stock plants. They moved their stock production facility to Guatemala during the 1990s and, in 2012, sold the business and the name. The leadership team stayed on. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 17, 2018

Adirondack Foundation Adds New Board Members, Elects Officers

Adirondack Foundation has announced Lawson Prince Allen, Margot Ernst, Reg Gignoux and Craig Weatherup have been added to its Board of Trustees. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 16, 2018

Hunters Cited For Killing Deer Over Bait Via Facebook, Big Buck Contest

ECO Tabor with buck taken illegally with baitNew York State Environmental Conservation Officer Ben Tabor reported that on November 30, several complainants called about a buck suspected of being taken over bait in the town of Ohio that had been entered in a local big buck contest.

Tabor said he determined where the deer had been shot after finding a large bait pile with the gut pile next to it and interviewed the suspect, who admitted to taking the buck illegally. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 16, 2018

Huckleberry Charlie’s Saga Continues

In June 1917, Charlie Sherman showed up as usual in Watertown to apprise his friends at the Daily Times how things were going. After discussing the blueberry crop, he mentioned his new cat, Snowball, who “could roll over three times without stopping.” A surprise once again was his attire, but not in the customary way: instead of a flashy, multicolored wardrobe, “his suit being of a sober, mixed gray, but to the sport type.”

The year played out in typical fashion, with Charlie selling berries during the summer and touring the fairs in the fall. As had become customary, he also played a role in Watertown’s Labor Day parade. “Charles Sherman, bedecked with emblems, lodge insignia, etc., was given a prominent place in the parade, and even preceded the Fourth Artillery band at times when he considered the occasion demanded. The parade was witnessed by a large crowd of Watertown people who lined the Square on all sides, as well as [seven] other streets taken in on the line of march.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 16, 2018

Slowing Aquatic Invasive Spread in 2019 Webinar Series

NYSG Launch ManualThe 2019 edition of the Watercraft Inspection Program Leader educational webinar series developed by New York Sea Grant and featuring coastal science and AIS specialists begins on January 17 and will connect participants from multiple states.

Four sessions in the webinar series will address issues associated with recreational boating as a key pathway in the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS), making watercraft inspection a critical contributor to limiting the spread of AIS among the more than 7,000 lakes, ponds, and rivers in New York State and waters elsewhere. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 15, 2018

New Book On Lake George Speedboat “El Lagarto”

El LagartoA new book by Jon Bowers, Legend of Lake George “El Lagarto” and the Men That Made Her Great, is set to be published in the next few weeks, and is now available for pre-order.

Bowers says the book “sets record straight” on the story of the famous wooden Lake George speedboat owned by George Reis. Bower’s grandfather, Anderson “Dick” Bowers, was the mechanic who worked with and for Reis over the lifetime of El Lagarto. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 15, 2018

Poetry: After the Flowers

After the Flowers

Into the hush a mother
needs when she strokes
the soft temples of her infant
son, outside the dewdrops
emerge once more. After the
flowers are gone, on a blanket
of peat moss, feeding the frogs
and snakes, they emerge,
hurtling toward the starved
emptiness of another daybreak.


Friday, December 14, 2018

Rail Trail Corridor Definition Change Headed To Governor

APA Building in Ray Brook NYThe New York State Adirondack Park Agency has recommended approval for an amendment to the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan (APSLMP) to change the Travel Corridors classification category definition, the guidelines for management and use, and amendments of related provisions. The Agency’s recommendation will move to Governor Andrew Cuomo for his approval.

The Agency issued the following news release Friday afternoon. You can read more about the rail trail controversy here at the Adirondack Almanack: » Continue Reading.


Friday, December 14, 2018

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, December 14, 2018

CATS Celebrating New Viall’s Crossing Trails Dec 29th

Volunteers on Vialls Crossing trailsChamplain Area Trails (CATS) has announced a grand opening hike, snowshoe, or ski, set for Saturday, December 29, beginning at 10 am, to celebrate the addition of two new “loop trails” to the Viall’s Crossing Trail.

Since opening last spring, the Viall’s Crossing Trail, has been an increasingly popular addition to the Champlain Area Trails (CATS) network. People use it to hike between Westport and Essex, or to make a five-mile loop that starts and ends in Westport, or as an out-and-back. » Continue Reading.


Friday, December 14, 2018

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories