Thursday, August 13, 2020

Farmers Markets: An Alternative to a Food System in Flux 

In March, when Governor Cuomo signed the ‘New York State on PAUSE’ executive order, which mandated that all non-essential businesses in New York State had to close, farmer’s markets were exempted as essential retail businesses and, as such, allowed to open or remain open.

But, as concerns about the spread of COVID-19 grew, farmers market growers, gardeners, and managers, like other small business operators, found themselves rushing to come up with innovative contingency plans to modify their operations and employ solutions that would protect their livelihoods, as well as the health and well-being of their customers, market workers, and the community at large.

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Thursday, August 13, 2020

Hub on the Hill Launches Fundraising Campaign for New Vehicles

Public welcome to donate at https://www.caringcrowd.org/provide-meals-food-insecure-families-impacted-covid-19

Resulting from a successful partnership with AdkAction, The Hub on the Hill will deliver approximately 5,500 Emergency Food Packages (EFPs) by October 1, 2020. This project has supplied tens of thousands of meals and put food on the tables of hundreds of families facing increased food insecurity due to COVID-19. 

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Thursday, August 13, 2020

DEC Opens Wildlife Management Areas for 16-Day Window

DEC logoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is opening several Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties  to the public from Saturday, Aug. 15, through Sunday Aug. 30.

Parts of these wetland restricted areas are normally marked off in order to allow waterfowl and other listed species to breed and raise their young away from the interference of humans.

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Thursday, August 13, 2020

Hyde reopens; offers free admission to essential workers this month

The Hyde Collection is offering free admission to all essential workers and their families throughout the month of August as a thank you for their service during the COVID-19 crisis. After being closed for several months because of the pandemic, The Hyde Collection reopened to visitors on the first of the month.

In accordance with CDC guidelines, The Hyde is open only for visitors who have made appointments on hydecollection.org. When making a reservation online, there is an “Essential Workers and Family” field where first responders, health care workers and all other essential workers can enter the number of family members they will be attending with, and they will not be charged for those tickets.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Fresh Air School: Lessons in outdoor education

As autumn approaches, schools are thinking about ways to keep students safe by maximizing time outdoors. The concept of outside instruction is not new. Leading up to WWII, open air schools were built in the United States and Europe to protect children from tuberculosis. Even in Saranac Lake, where temperatures in the winter tend to stay well below freezing, some children attended unheated, open air classrooms.

In the mid-1920s, the Saranac Lake School District built an open air school at River Street, at a cost of $12,000. All Saranac Lake children were weighed periodically and X-rayed annually. Those found to be underweight attended the Fresh Air School. The building, now used for a nursery school, is located behind the former River Street School. In 1937, the Fresh Air School moved to a new six-room addition built at Petrova School. 

Open air education wasn’t just for preventing illness and improving health. It was also widely used in summer camps as a natural extension of the camping experience. At local camps over generations, children have learned skills outdoors, such as arts, crafts, sports, and music.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020

New Milestone for Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) Mitigation

The SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and Clarkson University will deploy new technologies to combat harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Neatahwanta in Oswego County this summer. In 2019, Governor Cuomo challenged these research institutions to use their scientific expertise in water quality to develop new and innovative technologies to reduce the impact of HABs. SUNY ESF and Clarkson University will study the effectiveness of their experimental inventions this summer. Learn more about this project at DEC’s Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) Mitigation Studies webpage.

DEC will host a virtual public information session about the deployment of these experimental projects tonight, Wednesday, August 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. Register now for the information session.

photo courtesy of Upstate Freshwater Institute/Almanack archive

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Family stranded on Middle Saranac Lake

forest ranger logoRecent DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Harrietstown
Franklin County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On Aug. 5 at 3:24 p.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a man reporting that he was stranded with his wife and two granddaughters (10 and 16 years old) on the shore of Middle Saranac Lake. He stated that the wind was too strong to paddle back the way they came. The caller estimated that the group was about a quarter of a mile north of the outlet of Middle and Lower Saranac lakes. Forest Ranger DiCintio responded to assist with the help of DEC Operations staff. Two boats were deployed to the stranded canoeists’ location, one to transport the group of four and the other to tow their canoe and two kayaks. At 6:13 p.m., Ranger DiCintio advised that the group from Cincinnati, Ohio, had been dropped off at the South Creek boat launch where their vehicle was located.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Submissions sought for exhibit reflecting on life during pandemic

 The Adirondack Artists Guild, in partnership with the Adirondack Center for Writing, presents Responding II – 2020 as its featured exhibit in September, running from Sept. 4-29.

The title comes from the Gallery’s history – shortly after September 11, 2001, we invited artists, writers, and anyone else who wanted to respond to or share their feelings about that horrific event. We called the show “Responding”, and the gallery was full of deeply moving and expressive creations.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Should ‘secret spots’ stay that way?

SECRET SPOTS: We all have them. In a commentary in the Almanack, outdoors enthusiast Paul Kalac questions whether the rise in social media is doing a disservice to our treasured places.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS: Should ‘secret spots’ stay that way? Is the internet to blame? Join the conversation in the comments section or send an email to [email protected].


Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Tread Lightly on the Internet

By Paul Kalac

I was a thirteen or fourteen-year-old boy in the early 80’s when I started fly-fishing for trout.  I’m not sure if I instinctively understood to keep my favorite trout streams to myself, or if I was taught to keep them to myself by the old-timers who made me a fly-fisher. But I was imperfect.  I shared my favorite trout streams with some high school buddies. I know some of those guys were not my closest friends. So there’s no telling with whom they talked after we fished together.  I’m sure word got around to some degree.

A watershed association made up of key groups and individuals formed on my favorite trout stream in the 1990’s and I became secretary. I had since learned that trout streams need friends, not button-lipped fly fishers.  The minds of the old-timers who wanted to keep the stream’s secrets to themselves were flawed; all those who enjoyed or profited from the resource needed to come together to discuss and tackle issues related to the health of the watershed.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid infestation found in Washington Co.

Hemlock with HWA egg masses_Connecticut Agricultural Experiment StationThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the confirmation of an infestation of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) on Forest Preserve lands in the town of Dresden in Washington County.

The affected hemlock trees were located near a campsite within Glen Island Campground on the shore of Lake George. This is the second known infestation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) in the Adirondacks.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Adirondack Foundation to #ToastADK on Aug. 14

Adirondack Foundation’s annual summer party is going digital. “Toast the Adirondacks: An Online Celebration of Community and Philanthropy” will stream live on Friday, August 14 starting at 4:30 pm. Everyone is welcome to attend.
The Foundation, which serves as the philanthropic hub for the Adirondack region and recently closed out a record-breaking $5.4 million year in grantmaking, invites friends and neighbors from all corners of the region to celebrate the resiliency of local communities, vital services of nonprofits, and generosity of donors – especially during  the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020

DEC Reminds Hikers to Follow Common Sense Rules of the Outdoors

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation would like to remind hikers, and all who enjoy outdoor recreation to follow the “common sense rules of the outdoors,” such as preparing for arduous conditions, avoiding sensitive ecology, picking up your trash, and respecting your fellow visitors and those working to protect our wilderness.

We are currently experiencing a boom in outdoor recreation, with areas of the Adirondack park and the Catskill Parks reaching record numbers of visitors. Issues of littering, trash, and unprepared hikers affecting natural resources have increased in proportion to these record numbers, and it is essential to reinforce these common sense rules in order to protect both the safety of the public and the integrity of the sensitive plants and wildlife.

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Monday, August 10, 2020

Exploring forgotten lands: The Sable Highlands

While crowds of people continue to show up at High Peak trailheads between St. Huberts and Lake Placid, there are still plenty of wild places in the Adirondacks where you can spend time and possibly not even see another person.

Just the other day, I took a quick paddle on Grass Pond in the Sable Highlands, located near Loon Lake in the northern Adirondacks, and didn’t see another soul.

Earlier in the year, I took a bike ride and hike with former Explorer editor Phil Brown on the same easement property and also didn’t see anyone else recreating. That day, Phil and I left from a parking area at Fishhole Pond. We were exploring the property because Phil was working on a story about a bike route and trail that had been planned by the state but had never been implemented.

Phil spent a good amount his time exploring the Sable Highlands easement lands this spring and summer. What he found is that many of the recreation routes that the state had been planning to develop were never completed.

In recent weeks we’ve started publishing Phil’s explorations of the Sable Highlands easement lands on our website.

You can read the pieces he’s published already by following the links here. One is about a planned bike route near Fishhole Pond and the other is about a trail up Norton Peak near Standish that was never built.


Monday, August 10, 2020

Poetry: Center

Center

Tiny circle,

Center,

Living in us all,

Outlined in hopes and dreams,

Called by infinite names

Known well, by each keeper.

Tiny circle,

Now shot through with arrows,

Begs mending of its torn edges,

Begs smoothing of the marksman’s ravaging.

Tiny circle,

Center,

Living in us all,

Hold tightly to its clarity and peace,

Like a lake reflecting the sun’s path.

Think of wholeness.  Of wounds that heal.

Shore up the tiny circle,

Bright circle of promise,

That still lives,

In us all.

 

Read More Poems From The Adirondack Almanack HERE.



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