Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Forever Wild, Forever Prejudiced?

Michaela DunnAdirondack towns don’t love me back. 

I’ve gone through a lot of moments of frustration, confusion, and loss for how to deal with the topics floating around in my head. They’re not easy to talk about. Often I’m left on the other end of a conversation feeling as alone as when it started. I’ve stopped trying to correct comments that subtly put down Queer people, or address responses that don’t understand where I’m coming from. I’ve ignored the people imposing their own experience on mine, the comments that assure me they completely understand. 

Their intentions are good, and I get that. People are full of good intentions, but those intentions do not always translate to actions or behavior or language that seeks to understand. 

It is exhausting to always explain it. 

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Bears already?

black bearIt’s not too early for New York homeowners to think about bear-proofing their properties. While most of our bears are still in their dens, some may be out searching for food. These bears will seek easy meals from bird feeders or unsecured garbage.

In most years, we see bears leaving their dens beginning around mid-March. Folks who feed birds in bear country should begin emptying feeders and cleaning up dropped seed before then, or anytime you observe bear signs. It’s also a good time to make sure garbage cans are secured and stored in a sturdy building.

Photo of black bear by Pete Patrick.


Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Snowmobiler dies following Lake George crash through the ice

forest ranger reportsRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Lake George
Warren County
Ice Rescue:
 On Feb. 25 at 4 p.m., Forest Ranger Donegan was notified of a snowmobile accident on Lake George with the snowmobiler still in the water. Ranger Donegan responded to the scene adjacent to a local marina while Forest Rangers Kabrehl, Perryman, and Lt. Kallen responded to a launch site with Airboat 54. Ranger Donegan donned a cold-water rescue suit, went into the water to look for the man, but could not immediately find him. A diver with the North Queensbury Fire Department then located the 35-year-old man from the Bronx, and together with Ranger Donegan and members of the Bay Ridge and Lake George fire departments, removed him from the water. Ranger Donegan and a Sheriff’s Deputy immediately began life-saving measures. The individual was turned over to the local EMS and transported to a local hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. Rangers stayed on scene with the airboat to assist the Warren County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 3, 2021

A different kind of lobby day

lobby day 2020It’s hard to believe it’s already March 2021. One year ago I was getting my feet wet at the state Capitol, setting up shop at a table in the Legislative Correspondent’s Association offices on the third floor. Gov. Andrew Cuomo was beginning to hold more “Red Rooms,” meaning press conferences, about the coronavirus.

As of mid-March, I had stopped going to the Capitol. Since then, as with so many other folks, I have made home my workshop. While I am lucky to be able to conduct my job over email, the phone, Zoom and a few distanced in-person visits, I noticed just how different things are when advocacy groups posted on Twitter about the Adirondack Park lobbying day last week. 

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Adirondack Relocation Assessment Survey releases results

Adirondack Relocation Assessment SurveyNew research conducted by Camoin 310 of Saratoga Springs for the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) in Lake Placid and the Economic Development Corporation of Warren County (EDC) shows there is a strong interest for relocation to the Adirondacks across all income brackets in the Regional Market Area. This area includes New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Hampshire, and New Jersey. 

About the survey: A total of 6,733 responses were collected and analyzed by Camoin 310 from January 19, 2021 to January 29, 2021. More than 80% of respondents now live in the Northeast, but there were responses from as far away as Florida, California, Texas, Colorado, Missouri, Minnesota, and Oregon, as well as international locations. 

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Northern Forest Center forms strategy for attracting new residents

School enrollment mapLike other parts of the Northern Forest, many Adirondack communities struggle to maintain strong schools, a robust workforce, and vital civic institutions. The challenges these communities face are economic and demographic, but the solution is simple: to attract and retain more young people to live in these communities.

In February 2021, the Center released Attracting New Residents to the Adirondacks: A Strategy for the Adirondack Park and its CommunitiesDownload the full strategy. 

Download the executive summary.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 2, 2021

ADK releases updated edition of best-selling High Peaks guidebook

ADK trail mapChanges reflect new zoning, recent additions to the High Peaks Wilderness

The brand-new 15th edition of High Peaks Trails, the flagship of ADK’s (Adirondack Mountain Club’s) comprehensive Forest Preserve Series of guidebooks, has just been released. The volume is edited by longtime Adirondack adventurer Tony Goodwin, who has been writing and updating guidebooks for over 30 years.

Since the 14th edition was published in 2012, 47,000 acres of Forest Preserve have been added to the High Peaks Wilderness Area. Its boundaries have been redrawn, and new regulations governing use of these areas are anticipated. The new 15th edition addresses the significant zone changes that have been implemented by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, as well as new acquisitions, new trails, reroutes, restored and altered trailheads, and parking regulations.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 1, 2021

Farm micro-grants available up to $1,500

Soil Health on Market Farms workshopThe Adirondack Council’s Essex Farm Institute (EFI) will offer grants of up to $1,500 per applicant for projects that are both environmentally beneficial and sustainable. They will be seeking applicants starting today for their 2021 micro-grant cycle until the end of the month. 

To date, the micro-grant program has awarded over $129,000 in the support of over 85 projects since the programs conception in 2016, with 13 farms being awarded grants during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. 

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 1, 2021

The Lake Placid Land Conservatory Gains National Recognition

In a recent press release, the Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) has revealed that it has been awarded accredited status by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission- a significant achievement in the field of land conservation. The Land Trust Accrediation Commission, an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance, granted the accreditation after an in-depth review of the LPCA’s programs, activities and policies. The seal of accreditation represents a commitment to meeting national standards of quality for the permanent protection of important natural places throughout the Adirondacks.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 1, 2021

Adirondack Research Consortium presents spring series

Adirondack Research Consortium presents a Spring Webinar Series: Four one-hour virtual sessions at 10 AM on Fridays in March will address how environmental legacies influence the present and future of the Adirondacks.

Theme: “Landscape Legacies in the Adirondacks”

Fridays in March 10:00 am
3/5: Enduring footprints in the Adirondacks
Moderator: Ellen Percy-Kraly (Colgate University)3/12: Dams and Aquatic Connectivity: Eco-systems, Communities, Energy, and Infrastructure
Moderator: Stephen Bird (Clarkson)3/19: Recreation in the Adirondacks
Moderator: Julia Goren (Adirondack Council)3/26: Linking Past to Present: A look at Diverse Peoples within the Adirondacks
Moderator: Donathan Brown (RIT)CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Almanack file photo


Sunday, February 28, 2021

Snow Jobs: The white stuff makes for good growing

Where agriculture is concerned, dairy is king (or is dairy queen?) in northern NY State. Looking out the window now in late February, though, it looks like we should be growing snow peas or iceberg lettuce. Actually, for farmers, maple producers, foresters and gardeners, there is an up-side to having plenty of winter white stuff.

Snow has been called “the poor person’s fertilizer” because it’s a source of trace elements and more importantly, of plant-available forms of nitrogen, a nutrient often in short supply. When snowmelt releases a whole winter’s worth (i.e., almost six months) of nutrients in a short time, the nitrogen value can add up.

Since air is 78% nitrogen, you’d think plants would have all they needed. But atmospheric nitrogen, N2, is a very stable, inert molecule that plants are unable to use – you might say that for plants, nitrogen gas is broken. Fortunately, some soil bacteria can “fix” gaseous nitrogen, converting it to water-soluble forms that plants can slurp up. Lightning also turns nitrogen gas into plant “food.” But this only accounts for a small percentage of the nitrogen found in snow.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 28, 2021

Adirondacks the musical

Edward M. Shepard and the Making of a People’s ParkJust for fun discussion idea….I recently watched a filmed performance of the musical “Hamilton.” Which got me thinking: What would “Adirondacks, the musical” look like? Who would the main actors be? What would they sing about?

Some song title ideas (using existing songs for inspiration):
“Climb every mountain”

“Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”

“Misty Mountain Hop”

Maybe we can take these ideas and start an Adirondack-themed playlist…

Photo: Shepard Park amphitheater by Fred Thatcher/Almanack archive


Sunday, February 28, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 27, 2021

Money for Lake Champlain water quality projects

lake champlain bridgeRecently, I wrote about the Adirondack Council asking the state to fund a wide-ranging study of water quality across the Adirondacks. (Speaking of the Council, it just hired someone away from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office to be its new vice president for conservation.)

I’ve been thinking about how much the public conversation is influenced by money — not just advertising and p.r., but money or lack of money for research.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 27, 2021

Adirondack stories project releases free teacher’s guide

Study of Nature, Dresden, Lake George David Johnson (1827-1908) 1870 Oil on canvasThe Keene Valley Library has added a guide for teachers to the “Adirondack Community: Capturing, Retaining, and Communicating the Stories of Who We Are” and “OurStoryBridge: Connecting the Past and Present” websites, available for free. 

The teacher’s guide is made up of a “how to” document, which spells out a lesson plan to use with the stories; a story selection chart to match the stories with specific high school courses; story summaries, which are quick synopses of the 180 stories available; and a sample school assignment.

This guide was created in part by Brad Hurlburt, Keene Central School teacher and liaison to Adirondack Community project. He says the following about the guide:

» Continue Reading.



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