Monday, December 11, 2006

Winter Camping in the Adirondacks

Jim Muller of Holland Patent has been backpacking since the 1960s, but about nine years ago he and a few friends (age 20 to 50) began camping in the Adirondacks in the winter months – no bears, no black flies, no mosquitoes. “We have done a wide range of trips, from simple hikes to lean-tos while pulling a plastic sled to backpacking trips and multi-day dog sledding adventures,” Muller told the Adirondack Almanack in a recent e-mail.

We think that winter camping has advantages over summer camping: You can reach areas that are too wet or overgrown during other seasons, and the clear and open view is unparalleled. Winter camping provides solitude and a feeling of exploration; even heavily traveled trails seem like virgin territory when covered by a fresh blanket of snow. Camping in the winter inspires a feeling of independence and gives people confidence in their survival skills.

Winter camping also relieves some pressure from heavily (over) used High Peaks trails. Check out the Winter Campers web site at www.wintercampers.com. The site includes an Expedition Log, a list of winter Leave No Trace principles, winter camping Tips and Tricks, a comprehensive Gear List, along with Gear Reviews, and even some Poetry, and a Discussion Board.

The Outdoor Action Program of Princeton University also offers an outstanding introductory winter camping manual.


Suggested Reading

Bill Ingersoll’s Snowshoe Routes: Adirondacks & Catskills

Backpacker Magazine’s
Winter Hiking & Camping: Managing Cold for Comfort & Safety

Calvin Rustrum’s Paradise Below Zero: The Classic Guide to Winter Camping

Chris Townshend’s Wilderness Skiing & Winter Camping

AMC’s Guide to Winter Camping: Wilderness Travel and Adventure in the Cold-Weather Months

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John Warren

John Warren has been exploring the woods and waters of the Adirondacks for almost 50 years. After a career as a print journalist and documentary television producer he founded Adirondack Almanack in 2005 and co-founded the geolocation services company Adirondack Atlas in 2015.

John remains active in traditional media. His Adirondack Outdoors Conditions Report can be heard Friday mornings across the region on the stations of North Country Public Radio and on 93.3 / 102.1 The Mix. Since 2008, John has been a media specialist on the staff of the New York State Writers Institute.

John is also a professional researcher and historian with a M.A. in Public History. He edits The New York History Blog and is the author of two books of regional history. As a Grant Consultant for the William G. Pomeroy Foundation, he has reviewed hundreds of historic roadside marker grant applications from around New York State for historical accuracy.




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