Sunday, December 13, 2009

Lake Champlain: The Water in Between

The eastern edge of the Adirondack Park stretches into the middle of Lake Champlain, that great river-lake 120 miles long, four times the size of Lake George. Standing between the states of New York and Vermont, it’s the largest body of water in the Adirondacks, one that connects to the St. Lawrence River and Atlantic Ocean by way of the Quebec’s Richelieu River. A new book of 120 color photos of the Lake Champlain by more than 35 local photographers and edited by Jared Gange, does a remarkable job of capturing the lake: The Water in Between: A Photographic Celebration of Lake Champlain.

The book includes images by Carl Heilman II of Brant Lake, and Gary Randorf, former staff member for The Adirondack Council, along with those from other photographers from Vermont, New York and Québec, including John David Geery, Paul Boisvert, Robert Lyons, Daria Bishop, David Seaver, Marshall Webb, Steve Mease, Matt Larson, Dennis Curran, and Brian Mohr.

The Water in Between explores the culture, history, and environment, of both the New York and Vermont sides of the lake as well as images from Quebec and the Richelieu River. According to the publishers, “the book showcases the lake’s setting, its various river and lake sources, many activities both on and off the lake, and a number of towns, familiar bridges and buildings.” The book also includes a short narrative on the history, culture, and geography of the region.

Related Stories


Stories written under the Almanack's Editorial Staff byline are drawn from press releases and other notices.

To have your news noticed here at the Almanack contact our Editor John Warren at adkalmanack@gmail.com.




Comments are closed.