Saturday, July 28, 2018

Featured Hike: Mount Adams, Newcomb

mount adams trailThe Mt. Adams trail is typical of old fire tower access trails that head straight up the mountain. It leaves the East River Trail at the Observer Cabin and goes directly to the 3,520-foot summit. Mt. Adams provides an amazingly unique view of the High Peaks from below, while towering over the historic mining area and looking down at the Hudson River.

The 4.6-mile round trip hike starts off with Mt. Adams a swinging iron suspension bridge crossing over the Hudson River. Once over the bridge, a level trail takes you around Lake Jimmy. At .07 miles you will pass by the observer’s cabin on your left and locate the trail to Adams on the left at the top of a small rise. A cairn will mark the start of the 1.6-mile fire tower trail that will lead you to the summit with approximately 1800-ft in elevation gain.

Trailhead: The 1st parking area for the Upper Works Trailhead is located on County Route 25, also called Tahawus Rd which then turns into Upper Works Rd in Newcomb, NY. The fire tower trailhead parking area is located just past the MacIntyre Iron Furnace.

Featured hikes are recommended by DEC.

Map of Mount Adams courtesy Adirondack Atlas.

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5 Responses

  1. Boreas says:

    I would bet this would be a very nice winter trip. I am sorry I never climbed it while I was still able. Although intriguing, it was always only on my back-burner. A word to the wise – don’t put off any hike that looks interesting. And no crowds!

  2. Lake Champlain says:

    A rather meager narrative for a ‘Featured Hike’.
    Here are my takes. I first climbed Mt. Adams over 30 years ago–two times– and then again during the summer of 2017. To fast forward quite a bit, when the DEC came up with their rather massive suggested changes to the Adirondacks I was pleasantly surprised to see that the restructuring(?) of the Mt. Adams trail was part of that package. Surprised because it doesn’t get that much traffic but pleased because, like many of the ranger trails that, as the article above noted, went ‘straight up’, the trail had simply been worn down by too many decades of hiking that hat turned boots on the ground to boots on the bedrock. But when I hiked it with friends in 2017 the trail had become badly eroded and was a mess. Once a trail becomes the lowest point for water to flow downhill, then erosion increases down to bedrock. Or to put it bluntly it was an awful hike and a new trail, like several others rebuilt & modified by professional trail crews, should once again make hiking up this mt. a rewarding experience.
    The irony about the awful trail was, and is, that the fire tower had been refurbished superbly, and by the way its 47 feet height is necessary to get a view above the trees. Complete with a circular map like the rangers used you get a great view of the high peaks from the south that can’t be seen from other peaks.
    So I look forward to a new, modified and modernized trail up this lesser known mt.
    I hope other similarly worn trails on the ‘fire tower’ peaks get similar treatment in the future.

  3. Lake Champlain says:

    A rather meager narrative for a ‘Featured Hike’.
    Here are my takes. I first climbed Mt. Adams over 30 years ago–two times– and then again during the summer of 2017. To fast forward quite a bit, when the DEC came up with their rather massive suggested changes to the Adirondacks I was pleasantly surprised to see that the restructuring(?) of the Mt. Adams trail was part of that package. Surprised because it doesn’t get that much traffic but pleased because, like many of the ranger trails that, as the article above noted, went ‘straight up’, the trail had simply been worn down by too many decades of hiking that hat turned boots on the ground to boots on the bedrock. But when I hiked it with friends in 2017 the trail had become badly eroded and was a mess. Once a trail becomes the lowest point for water to flow downhill, then erosion increases down to bedrock.

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