Saturday, August 4, 2018

The Nature Conservancy’s Nature Fair

The Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy is bringing science and nature together for a one day nature fair at their Keene Valley, New York office. Though a lot of the Nature Conservancy’s hard work is behind the scenes, the August 9 celebration is an opportunity for the staff to showcase their specialties and demonstrate how they continue to work to support communities and nature.

According to Associate Director of Philanthropy Erin Walkow, the idea for a nature fair sounded like the perfect way to connect the public with all the different departments within The Nature Conservancy.

“We want to show people what we are doing, not just tell them,” says Walkow. “I’m so proud of all the good work being done. We are using the model of a science fair. Each department has set up projects, games, and activities to showcase the different initiatives  in the Adirondacks. It is a new way to spread the word for the work we are doing in the Adirondacks.”

Walkow gives one example of how Adirondack communities benefit from the Nature Conservancy’s work. After extreme flooding in localized areas after Hurricane Irene, the need to create new culverts was a necessity. The old culverts were too narrow and high, leading to debris buildup which in turn contributed to flooding. The new open-bottom, concrete box culverts with natural stream beds opened up additional habitat for fish and are designed to tolerate high water volume. The organization continues to research ways to connect communities to nature.

“When the hurricane hit, there was so much flooding and damage. Whole communities were cut off,” explains Walkow. “An improved culvert was created and it was a win-win for people and nature. The rivers are healthier, which makes the communities healthier.”

The Nature Fair is going to be fun,” added Walkow. “We are going to have a lot of activities for kids, music, lots of food, and a movie about our work. There will be a tent so people be inside or outside. It’s going to happen rain or shine. Everything is free. We hope people will stop by and see why this work matters. We need more advocates to protect this special place and to protect the environment.”

The Nature Conservancy Nature Fair is August 9 from 3 to 6 pm at the Keene Valley office, located at 8 Nature Way. There are additional ways to connect to The Nature Conservancy. All six Adirondack Nature Preserves are open to the public to explore different ecosystems. There are other events and volunteer opportunities for people to discover all the different ways The Nature Conservancy connects people with nature.

Nature Fair photo provided.

Related Stories


Diane Chase

Diane Chase is the author of the Adirondack Family Activities guidebook series, Adirondack Family Time. She writes about ways to foster imaginative play through fun-filled events and activities in the Adirondack region.

From her home in Saranac Lake, Diane also writes a weekly family-oriented newspaper column for the Adirondack Daily Enterprise and keeps her own blog Adirondack Family Time. Her writing and photography has appeared in numerous newspapers, magazines, marketing companies and advertising agencies.

She even finds time to assist her husband with Adirondack Expeditions guiding families and young adults in the High Peaks.




9 Responses

  1. Mick Finn says:

    Another sell job to pull the wool over the taxpayers eyes. Only the wealthy elite benefit. What a sham.

    • Todd Eastman says:

      ” After extreme flooding in localized areas after Hurricane Irene, the need to create new culverts was a necessity. The old culverts were too narrow and high, leading to debris buildup which in turn contributed to flooding. The new open-bottom, concrete box culverts with natural stream beds opened up additional habitat for fish and are designed to tolerate high water volume. The organization continues to research ways to connect communities to nature.”

      Yup, seems like a vicious plot…

      • Mick Finn says:

        And state and county road repairs should be done by…(fill in blank).

        Moron.

        • Boreas says:

          And state and county road repairs should be done by…(fill in blank).

          The same people who do it now. Culverts aren’t out in the middle of nowhere – they are under roads. Since when AREN’T tax dollars used to repair and mitigate dangerous and environmentally damaging infrastructure? I think paranoia of people wanting to do the right thing may be clouding your judgement here.

  2. Diane Chase says:

    Mick, I had friends that lost their homes during Irene when the riverbanks dammed because the culverts were blocked. They are not wealthy. The fact that you think only the wealthy benefited, shows your ignorance on the subject. The Nature Conservancy worked with other organizations to design a solution so that whole communities would not have to suffer and be isolated when bridges were damaged because of the force of water. The Nature Conservancy continues to work with communities on numerous issues. Years ago, lumber companies clear cut whole forests. We now know that serious issues were directly related to that. Now reforestation is standard. The flooding demonstrated serious issues with culvert design and placement.

  3. Jim S. says:

    Isn’t the Nature Conservancy funded by donations rather than tax dollars?

    • Mick Finn says:

      No. It’s funded by large state purchases, so the taxpayers really fund it. However, and this is an important point, it’s set up to provide huge tax breaks to elite wealthy donors, and they make a fortune on their “donations” (investment), which the taxpayers pay for through the state acquisition programs.

      YOU GUYS ARE BEING DUPED BEYOND ALL MEASURE!

      • Paul says:

        All these transactions (as much as I personally dislike them) are between willing buyers and willing sellers. It’s the American way! Beyond maybe some holding costs the NC isn’t charging more than they purchased the land for when they sell in to NYS. Are some of their members wealthy? Sure, it’s a free country right?

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *