Monday, September 10, 2018

Comments Sought DEC Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced the release of a draft amendment to the 1990 Final Campground & Day-Use Area Generic Unit Management Plan for Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Stations.

DEC is inviting the public to comment on the draft amendment, which will guide siting, construction, and management of EV charging stations at DEC campgrounds and day-use areas. The comment period runs through September 30, 2018.

The New York Power Authority is currently installing 400 public chargers at airports, train stations, and municipal parking lots and, as recently announced, high-speed chargers have been installed on the New York State Thruway, with more planned for the remaining 23 service areas between New York City and Buffalo.

In March 2017, the state’s Drive Clean Rebate program began. Administered by NYSERDA, the program provides residents with a rebate of up to $2,000 for the purchase or lease of a new plug-in hybrid or battery electric car from participating new car dealers. This initiative played a central role in incentivizing the purchase of more than 10,000 electric cars in 2017, a 67 percent increase over 2016.

DEC manages 51 campgrounds in the Adirondack and Catskill parks with more than 1 million camper nights each season. The campgrounds and five special use areas at Lake George Beach, Prospect Mountain Highway, Hinckley Reservoir Picnic Area, Fourth Lake Picnic Area, and Lake George Battlefield Picnic Area also receive nearly 400,000 day-use visitors annually.

The draft amendment is posted on DEC’s webpage. Copies of the draft amendment also may be obtained by calling (518) 457-2500.

Public comments on the draft amendment will be accepted through September 30, 2018, and can be submitted by mail or email to: Josh Houghton, NYS DEC Bureau of Recreation, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-5253, Email: campinfo@dec.ny.gov.

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19 Responses

  1. Paul says:

    Seems like a good idea.

    I think that electric vehicle sales in the US have been decreasing slightly over the past few years. Need stuff like this. What we need is technology that can tap into the electrical potential in a plant so you can plug your car into a tree!

    Not as crazy as it might sound, check out what these guys at MIT are doing:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/glowing-plants-streetlamps-lamps-replacement-new-invention-a8113191.html

  2. Scott says:

    I bet this will not get a lot of use for many years. No motorhomes have electric motors yet. No trucks or SUVs with electric motors good enough to pull campers yet. Maybe in ten years.

  3. Michael Webster says:

    I used chargers in Old Forge, and Blue Mountain Lake. I was glad to find them. Sad to find nothing in Saranac Lake.

  4. Boreas says:

    I don’t really understand how they work. How does the user pay for the electrons – a credit card swipe or something? Prepaid card? Just curious.

  5. Paul says:

    One of the key concepts that you learn in many fields of work is that when you set goals they must be measurable and they must be reasonably attainable. If you look at the trends in electric vehicle sales in the US a goal of NYS putting 800,000 EVs on the road by 2025 is totally measurable and totally unattainable. In the second half of 2017 we sold 90,000 EV’s in the entire US. Is there some strange business phenomenon in NYS that could be behind this ridiculously high goal. I am not saying it is a bad idea, these are good, but these expectations are just ridiculous and are sure to lead to failure and more people will have fuel to argue against EVs.

    Three pickup trucks continue to totally dominate the US market. The F series p/u is by far the hands down most purchased vehicle in the US. Those are just the facts. People here will now spin this into me being some anti-EV person because I stated the obvious.

    • Boreas says:

      Paul,

      They didn’t say on WHICH roads. Perhaps they are going to focus on metropolitan areas, use driverless technology and put cabbies out to pasture.

    • john says:

      The DEC’s Clean Transportation plan sets goals for charging stations. It sets no goals for sales of electric vehicles.

      • Paul says:

        Look at page 4 and 5 of the UMP. This sounds like this is a component of the larger plan. It’s not a bad idea, just totally unrealistic given the current trends.

      • john says:

        To reiterate, the DEC plays no part in setting sales goals for electric cars. In 2014, NY entered into a multi-state plan that set a goal of having 3.3 million zero-emission cars on US roads by 2025. Currently, there are close to a million zero-emission vehicles on the road. Automakers averaged over 15 million retail car sales per year over the past twenty years. An additional 2 to 2.5 million zero-emission vehicle sales over the next six or seven years seems a very attainable benchmark. The DEC’s call for expanding electric vehicle opportunities into rural areas seems a laudable goal.

        • Paul says:

          John, I wish that was accurate. But to go from 90K EVs in half of 2017 to 2 million in 6 years? There isn’t even the production capacity? The cars they have sold and are selling are already part of a sophisticated production line that does not include these EVs. The DEC plan, as far as adding charging stations, like I said is a good plan.

  6. Austin Curt says:

    I’m picking up a Tesla 3 next week. Game changer. Happy that Musk is crazy enough to do stuff like this.

    Good for every purpose? No, of course not. Not our only vehicle. But with an extra $4,000 set of solar panels we’re installing (net cost), it will have a free, full “tank” every morning, so it’s going to be greatly favored.

    • Paul says:

      Good friend of mine has been waiting for his for a long time. Will get it soon. Game changer? NO. Cool car.

      • Curt Austin says:

        On the way home from the test drive, I couldn’t stop thinking of the pistons in my car thrashing wildly up and down in a bath of hot oil, valves slapping open and closed, injectors spurting fuel, spinning turbocharger, sparks, belts, filters, exhaust. Something called a “crankshaft”! It seemed so medieval.

        Pretty sure the game is changing. Already, the Tesla 3 is No. 5 in US car sales by units, No. 1 by revenue.

        • Pete Nelson Pete Nelson says:

          You are right on the money. EV’s are a game changer. The commitment by major auto manufacturers is overwhelming. The advantages are overwhelming, too. EV dominance is coming, it’s time to plan for it.

          Lest anyone have doubts, come to the EV event and my session at the Wild Center this Saturday.

  7. Paul says:

    GM was making a coal powered car in the 80’s. Maybe they could revive that and we could just have piles of coal (the “clean” type of course) at the campgrounds.

  8. I am glad they are finally making the decision to support the advancement and development of electric vehicles.

  9. […] week, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) had announced the release of a draft amendment to Generic Unit Management Plan for Final Campground & Day-Use […]

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