Wednesday, October 24, 2018

2,122 Acres Adjacent to Whitney Wilderness Privately Protected

Little Charley Pond tractThe Adirondack Land Trust and a private landowner have partnered to protect an intact forest and a unique strain of brook trout on 2,122 acres in the town of Long Lake.

The Little Charley Pond tract contains Snell, Bear and Little Charley ponds and five miles of undeveloped shoreline. A new owner, Charley Pond Preserve, has donated to the Adirondack Land Trust a perpetual conservation easement to keep the forest whole and safeguard a rare fish community.

The Adirondack Land Trust purchased Little Charley in 2007. After scientists identified an unexploited and genetically unique population of brook trout in Little Charley Pond, the land trust sought a conservation-minded private buyer who could protect the fish community. Under public ownership, the population would become vulnerable to introduction of competing species and fishing pressure.

The New York State Museum calls Little Charley brook trout a “native fish of critical conservation priority.” After a century of stocking of domestic strain brook trout and introduction of non-native game fish, wild strain brook trout have become rare throughout their range. In the Adirondack Park, approximately ten populations of native brook trout are known to remain with the genetic characteristics that evolved in their specific lakes over 15,000 years.

The conservation easement does not allow public access. The easement also restricts subdivision, allows one additional camp, and allows forest management under Forest Stewardship Council guidelines. The tract is contained within a 453,000-acre area of mostly roadless public and private forests where stability of ownership and land use has resulted in one of the largest intact blocks of forest remaining in the Eastern United States.

Founded in 1984, the Adirondack Land Trust works to protect farms and forests, undeveloped shoreline, scenic vistas and other lands contributing to the quality of life of our communities as well as the wildness and rural character of the Adirondacks. The land trust has protected 23,637 acres to date.

For more information, click here or contact info@adirondacklandtrust.org, or call (518) 576-2400.

Map courtesy Adirondack Atlas.

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18 Responses

  1. Steve Bailey says:

    Sabattis Adventure Boy Scout Camp is on Bear Pond. The owner, a NJ BS council, had some reported financial issues with keeping this camp open, seemingly resolved for the time being. I wonder how this affects this camp. I’ve known guys who went to camp there over the years, great place.

    • Trailcrazy says:

      The Scout Camp and Bear Pond are not included in this tract of land/easement. This is a case of bad fact checking by the reporter. The NJ BSA Council that owns the land has not sold or transferred the land in any way.

  2. Hallie says:

    Will the Lake Lila Access Road be re-routed?

  3. Scott says:

    Is this a new strain or is this another population of little tuppers?

  4. Charlie S says:

    “the land trust sought a conservation-minded private buyer who could protect the fish community. Under public ownership, the population would become vulnerable to introduction of competing species and fishing pressure…… The conservation easement does not allow public access.”

    >> It is so very nice to hear some positive news like this, that some of us care enough to protect a species of fish.There’s not enough good news like this to go around. I bet this new owner has ties to Vermont….these sorta things happen quite frequently (or seemingly so) in that most wondrous of states. Now if we can just get our government leaders to put efforts into doing the same since they have the money and the resources to do so.

    ” Under public ownership….”
    >> Keep the DEC out. I’m starting to like this idea the way they keep pushing for more automobile access and bridges and those god-forsaken loud contraptions snowmobiles in places that shouldn’t have them.

    “In the Adirondack Park, approximately ten populations of native brook trout are known to remain with the genetic characteristics that evolved in their specific lakes over 15,000 years.”

    >> There’s still some virginity left! How many places in this country can say that? This alone is a good reason why we should be more vigilant in keeping things the way they are in the Adirondacks…not more roads, not more motorized use, not more opening up for development to ‘bring money’ in.

  5. Smitty says:

    Sounds like a crappy deal for the public. No access, no fishing, no nothing. And this is a park? Couldn’t the fish be protected with artificial lures only catch and release? Then who gets to access the property? The donor? People won’t love and protect a park that they can’t use.

    • Ryan Finnigan says:

      Are you at all aware of the travesty that has occurred at Little Tipper Lake since that body of water was opened to the public?

      • Smitty says:

        Yes I am aware of the Little Tupper story and it’s very sad. But Little Tupper is very large with easy access and I think it was just no bait. Not artificial lures catch and release. Of course that doesn’t prevent intentional acts of ecological sabatage. But contrast that with Mountain Pond near Paul Smith’s. Catch and release, artificals only. Windfall strain wild trout have been protected but it receives lots of public use. Even though these ponds are apparently quite remote, you won’t even be allowed to hike or ski to them. Sort of like locking it up and throwing away the key. I’m glad to see that no public money was involved but what about the taxes on the land? Does someone now get a tax break for land that the public cannot use in any way?

    • Boreas says:

      Smitty,

      The way I understand it, this is an easement between 2 private concerns concerning private property – not a NYS tax easement. No net gain or loss for the public other than protection of the resource.

      • adkDreamer says:

        There is no such thing as a “NYS Tax Easement”. Just saying…

        • adkDreamer says:

          Link provided identifies: NYS Conservation Easement Tax Credit

          NYS Conservation Easement not equal to NYS Tax Easement.

          NYS Tax Easement is a fiction.

          • Smitty says:

            So yes, there is a significant tax break. And I suspect the owner or donor does have access to the lakes. So in a way, it may be just a low tax way for the priveledged to protect their private preserve. Maybe I’m overly skeptical and I’m sure their intentions are good, but it would be refreshing if the Adirondacks Land Trust was more transparent about the details of this transaction.

            • adkDreamer says:

              OK. This is a spelling/word construct correction only. There is no such thing as a “tax easement”. The term does not exist.

              These are OK:
              conservation easement
              express easement
              implied easement
              prescriptive easement
              negative easement
              affirmative easement
              access easement
              right-of-way easement

              ..and others, but “tax easement” is a fiction.

              • Boreas says:

                Thanks for clearing that up! Although most of us knew what I was referring to, we will all sleep easier tonight knowing that you caught me trying to pull the wool over everyone’s eyes with “fiction”. What would we do without you?

                • adkDreamer says:

                  Precisely and you are welcome.

                  The statements: “..most of us knew what I was referring to…” and “we will all sleep…”, and “What would we do…” are patently hearsay. (unless there are a bunch of people in the room with you that you are referencing)

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