Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Celebrate Spring by Planting Natives for Pollinators

pollinatorsAdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project has announced its second Pollinator Plant Sale. With the assistance of Cook & Gardener Nursery, these native pollinator plants and cultivars have been selected to thrive in the Adirondacks.

The plants have been sourced or grown from seed to ensure that they are free of neonicotinoids, a class of systemic insecticide that research shows is a major factor in Colony Collapse Disorder and loss of pollinator biodiversity.

Pollinator gardens planted by homeowners provide critical habitat for hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees in the Adirondacks, and native species or close cultivars are the best choice to help native pollinator species.  Many native bees are ground-nesting and need bare soil, so gardeners interested in supporting native pollinators should avoid using mulch.

The native plants are $10 each and come in large number-one sized pots. Planting packages that include detailed garden designs are available at a 10% savings. Online pre-sale orders will be accepted until May 31, 2019, or until sold out. To place an order, click here.

Individuals can pick up their plants at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake on June 13 from 4 to 6 pm, or on June 15th at Cook and Gardener Nursery in Plattsburgh, 11 am to 2 pm and at Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek by arrangement. All proceeds support the Adirondack Pollinator Project, a project of AdkAction in partnership with Lake Placid Land Conservancy, The Wild Center, and Paul Smith’s College.

The Adirondack Pollinator Project promotes the health of pollinators. AdkAction is a local 501 c3 nonprofit organization works to create projects that address unmet needs, promote vibrant communities, and preserve the character of the Adirondacks.

Photo courtesy Jim Connolly and Tammy Venne.

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6 Responses

  1. Boreas says:

    Even if you can’t manage to get plants from AdkAction, get some elsewhere and plant them. The world can’t have enough flowers and pollinators!

  2. Julie Meer Harnick says:

    Please tell us what plants are native and are pollinators

  3. Paul says:

    “The plants have been sourced or grown from seed to ensure that they are free of neonicotinoids, a class of systemic insecticide that research shows is a major factor in Colony Collapse Disorder and loss of pollinator biodiversity.”

    Why is this in here? It has not been shown yet to be a “major factor” in colony collapse. The link is to a 2013 article. It is one that doesn’t even reference colony collapse. Here is a link to a Cornell site that summarizes the research too date. Not saying that these are good things just saying that these have not been shown in real time field studies to have an impact and certainly not a “major factor” at this point.

    https://pollinator.cals.cornell.edu/threats-wild-and-managed-bees/pesticides/neonicotinoids/

    The other thing is that these types of plants are never treated with neonicotinoids. So you don’t need to worry about it for these plants.

    As for row crops. There is this one European study that showed in one area there was a negative impact on bees collecting pollen from Canola that was treated. But in the same study in Germany the colonies near the treated fields were doing BETTER than the control!

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/29/534852611/pesticides-are-harming-bees-but-not-everywhere-major-new-study-shows

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