Monday, May 18, 2020

Promising News for Adirondack Brook Trout Ponds

Water chemistry values for 13 ponds in the Adirondacks have recently been evaluated and indicate that the brook trout that inhabit those waters may have the potential to reproduce naturally, which could eliminate the need for stocking. Stocking will be suspended in 2020 and 2021 and the ponds will be surveyed in 2022 to determine if stocking is needed.

The 14,000 brook trout fingerlings that would have been stocked in these waters will now be stocked into other Adirondack ponds to help offset an anticipated shortage of Temiscamie hybrid brook trout this fall.

For further information email [email protected]

Editor’s note: Adirondack fishing guides have mixed feelings about the start of this year’s angling season in the midst of COVID-19. Read about it in the Adirondack Explorer: https://www.adirondackexplorer.org/stories/too-soon-fishing-guides-have-mixed-views-on-getting-clients-back-in-the-water

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NYS DEC

Information attributed to NYSDEC is taken from press releases and news announcements from New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation.




9 Responses

  1. Tim-Brunswick says:

    Typical NYSDEC…and nothing more than a ploy to cut stocking costs and eventually cut back the fish hatcheries. I find it particularly interesting, but not surprising that they haven’t release the actual names/locations of the self-supporting ponds.

    The entire fishing/fishery program approach has taken a different approach and is clouded by supposed improvement of the “quality” of fishing, which is a bunch of baloney. The real objective is to cut back on production and delivery costs Statewide…..my opinion and the opinion of many, many anglers I know.

    • Boreal says:

      I agree. With likely rollbacks of Clean Air Act policy, how longer are those ponds going to stay healthy? I would prefer to see more C&R waters, especially within the Park combined with more stocking of native brook trout in streams. I have never been a believer that browns and brookies coexist happily.

    • Steve says:

      Conspiracy theories and nonsense. Yes, it may be shocking to some but before overfishing, logging, pollution, and invasive fish species most every adk pond had self sustaining populations of brook trout. The fact that a few have recovered to the point where they don’t need stocking is a victory for the bipartisan group of lawmakers and GeorgeHWBush who passed the Clean Air act amendments of 1990. Note that it took from then until now for these bodies of water to recover, underscoring the seriousness of the acid rain problem. If you were a little more astute you would also note, Tim-Brunswick, that every year DEC stocks previously dead ponds that are showing signs of acid rain recovery so your theory about shutting down hatcheries is bunk-any fish not being stocked into the ponds from this article are shifted to others. Hatcheries remain a vital part of restoring lost wild brook trout populations to the Adirondacks.

      • Jesse says:

        Yes agreed !! But they need reclaim more ponds An look at restoring Catskills ponds lks that were once brookie lks

  2. Tony says:

    Anybody who wants to look at what the actual stocking numbers are can thru the DEC website, https://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7739.html. You can pull out the data in couple of different ways by clicking thru the links. One section is the actual stocking from 2011-2018, by county & waterbody. The other is actual Spring 2020 and projected spring 2020, by county & waterbody. If you are a nerd, like me, you can build apps to pull from the APIs and create your own visuals which you can then use to pick which waterbodies to fish based on past stocking.

    • Tony says:

      Forgot to say this but IMO this is great news. I am too young to have every had the pleasure of putting in the effort to get to some of the more remote 2500ish elevation ponds/lakes to fish and would love my children to have that opportunity. Also after a little googling you can find the ponds/lakes they are monitoring, http://www.adirondacklakessurvey.org/, haven’t dug through this but I’m betting you can figure out these lakes/ponds that are coming back, Lake Colden is one I know that.

  3. Charlie S says:

    Steve says: “Note that it took from then until now for these bodies of water to recover, underscoring the seriousness of the acid rain problem.”

    Note that President Thump and his terrorist regime is doing every thing in their power to take away all of those protections that previous administrations fought to preserve. Left and right he is dismantling as many laws as he possibly can which protect our environment. He (his party) just does not care! He’s a money man, economy first. He is reversing so much! He is being labeled by green groups, and others, as the worst president we’ve ever had so far as the environment goes. At a time, moreso than ever,when we should be going in the opposite direction! Look it up. The information is out there, this is not fake news. There’s just so so much ugly coming out of this administration! It makes one wonder…why all of his support? The answer which immediately comes to mind…ignorance! So I expect things will get worse Steve…for our air and water and ecosystems. This is just what they do…pollute. What more can we expect from polluted souls? They are just horrible people those neocons in power now! If they win another four years this country most certainly is going to go bankrupt, if that don’t happen due to this pandemic first!

  4. Boreas says:

    Charlie,

    “…why all of his support?” The first amendment guarantees freedom of the press – but it doesn’t guarantee it will be truthful. Ignorance of the facts is one thing, but many people today prefer entertainment “news” to the truth because it speaks to and validates their inner fears, distrust, and biases. So with regard to bankruptcy, don’t forget moral bankruptcy. That is what happens when you put politics and profits over common decency.

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