Thursday, October 15, 2020

DEC: Be on the lookout for moose sightings this fall

Early fall is the breeding season for moose in northern New York and moose sightings are more common. During this time moose are wandering looking for mates, leading them to areas where they are not typically seen. While this improves the opportunities for people to enjoy sighting of a moose, it also increases the danger of colliding with one on the roadway.

Motorists should be alert for moose on roadways in the Adirondacks and surrounding areas at this time of year during peak moose activity, advises the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Moose are much larger and taller than deer. Their large body causes greater damage, and, when struck, their height often causes them to impact the windshield of a car or pickup truck, not just the front of the vehicle. New York has no recorded human fatalities resulting from a crash with a moose.


Moose are most active at dawn and dusk, which are times of poor visibility. Moose are especially difficult to see at night because of their dark brown to black coloring and their height – which puts their head and much of their body above vehicle headlights.

DEC advises motorists to take the following precautions to prevent moose vehicle collisions:

  • Use extreme caution when driving at dawn or dusk, especially during September and October;
  • Reduce your speed, stay alert, and watch the roadsides;
  • Slow down when approaching moose standing near the roadside, as they may bolt at the last minute when a car comes closer, often running into the road;
  • Moose may travel in pairs or small groups, so if a moose is spotted crossing the road, be alert for others that may follow;
  • Make sure all vehicle occupants wear seatbelts and children are properly restrained in child safety seats;
  • Use flashers or a headlight signal to warn other drivers when moose are spotted near the road;
  • Motorcyclists should be especially alert for moose;
  • If a moose does run in front of your vehicle, brake firmly but do not swerve.
  • Swerving can cause a vehicle-vehicle collision or cause the vehicle to hit a fixed object such as a tree or pole; and
  • If a moose is hit and killed by a vehicle, the motorist should not remove the animal unless a permit is obtained from the investigating officer at the scene of the crash.

Hunters, hikers, and other outdoor enthusiasts are encouraged to enjoy wildlife from a distance. Do not approach wildlife, particularly species like bear or moose that could be aggressive toward humans or protective of their young.

More information about moose can be found on DEC’s website.

Photo courtesy of Jackie Woodcock

Just for fun: Check out this Explorer clip of a moose crossing a trail in the Sable Highlands, set to “Dreams” by Fleetwood Mac

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Melissa is a journalist with experience as a reporter and editor with the Burlington Free Press, Ithaca Journal and Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. She worked as a communications specialist for the Adirondack North Country Association and runs her own New York State Women owned Business-Enterprise Bootstrap Communications, which includes digital marketing, strategy and design. She enjoys hiking, camping and other outdoors activities, and spending time with her husband, their twin daughters, and rescue animals -- two dogs and a cat.


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One Response

  1. Vanessa says:

    LOL @ the moose dreams :):)

    My friends from Maine are super wary of moose on roadways. They say the same thing – the height of a moose makes it much different than hitting a deer. Also good to consider the poor moose too. Having grown up in a rural area with waaaaay too many deer, everyone has a story of hitting one. The deer are rarely too happy if you hit them – and unfortunately you can wound them pretty badly without killing them instantly. Coming across a half-dead deer in your travels ain’t fun :(:(

    Apparently, on the other hand, moose will fudge you up if you them, and rarely die on impact. 😮

    I really want to see one in the ADK though. Bucket list item for sure.

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