Thursday, July 1, 2021

DEC update on Gypsy Moth Caterpillar Outbreak

gypsy moth pupaThis spring, DEC has been receiving reports of larger-than-usual gypsy moth populations and leaf damage in several parts of New York State. Gypsy moths are non-native but are naturalized, meaning they will always be around in our forests.

Their populations spike in numbers roughly every 10 to 15 years, but these outbreaks are usually ended by natural causes such as disease and predators. Because of this, DEC and its partners typically do not manage it. At this time, DEC does not provide funding for treating gypsy moths on private property.

The caterpillars you are seeing now will begin to disappear around mid-July when they pupate and become moths. Spraying insecticides is not effective at this late stage of caterpillar development.

This time of year, you may choose to use or make a trap on your trees to catch caterpillars while they are still crawling, though this will not erase the population. Please monitor your traps regularly for unintended wildlife that may pass through. In winter, you can help DEC predict next year’s population numbers by conducting egg sampling surveys.

In spring, you may scrape egg masses to prevent some hatching, though that will also not erase the population. The spikes in gypsy moth numbers are an unfortunate but cyclical part of NY’s forests.

Pictured here: Gypsy moth caterpillars going into the pupa stage. Photo by Diane Parmeter Wills of Peru.

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NYS DEC

Information attributed to NYSDEC is taken from press releases and news announcements from New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation.


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2 Responses

  1. Paul says:

    As I understand it, it is very important NOT to spray and disrupt the natural cycle.

    If you do you will lose natural “predators” like viruses that naturally control the population. Screw that up and you could end up with too many years of the caterpillars and then no trees.

    Be patient.

  2. Ellen Smith says:

    We had an extremely large infestation and then moths and now eggs everywhere. Please publish alternatives to this disgusting situation. We have 60 plus acres so particular ideas are appreciated.

    Ellen Smith
    Putnam Station

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