Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Polystyrene Foam Ban Updates

 

fpolystyrene foam ban

A polystyrene burger box pollutes a the reeds by the side of the river.

Effective Jan. 1, 2022, no covered food service provider or store (retail or wholesale) will be allowed to sell, offer for sale, or distribute disposable food service containers that contain expanded polystyrene foam in New York state. In addition, no manufacturer or store will be allowed to sell, offer for sale, or distribute polystyrene loose fill packaging (commonly referred to as packing peanuts) in the state.

Proposed 6 NYCRR Part 353 will implement the prohibition on the sale and distribution of expanded polystyrene foam containers and loose fill “packing peanuts.”

Foam Free NY Outreach Materials Now Available
Educational materials that provide information about NY State’s foam ban are now available. Materials include a flyer and rack card summarizing the requirements of law and a social media toolkit with graphics. Please check back to the foam ban webpage for materials that are translated into different languages.

Waiver Request Form Now Available
Covered food service providers and facilities that meet certain criteria may request a renewable 12-month financial hardship waiver from DEC. Determine if you are eligible and download the waiver request form. The waiver request form is available for download in multiple languages including English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Yiddish, Bengali, Korean, Haitian Creole, Italian, Arabic and Polish languages.

For more information about NY state’s Foam Ban, contact [email protected] with any questions.

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Information attributed to NYSDEC is taken from press releases and news announcements from New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation.




3 Responses

  1. nathan says:

    plastic drinking cups from stores should be on there, waxed paper cups worked fine, get rid of single use plastic cups.
    A $.10 deposit on every single plastic bottle, from water bottles by the case to milk and juice jugs. make them all deposit and then sorted recycling would work.
    require that every container made is only allowed if it is truely recycled!!
    only straws that biodegrade in 6 months or less.

  2. Boreas says:

    I agree with the ban, but disagree with the fact that the ban is at the consumer level. What worldwide action is being made to ban the MANUFACTURE of environmentally hazardous plastics floating in our oceans and waterways? Bans and laws such as this which target the end-user are misplaced, as the petrochemical giants pushing plastics of all types are content to continue to play whack-a-mole with local legislation. You need to aim at the head of a giant if you want change – not its footprints.

  3. Charlie Stehlin says:

    This is very welcome news! A start!

    “You need to aim at the head of a giant if you want change – not its footprints.”

    The efforts are endless, the stories manifold Boreas. ‘Giants without hearts.’ How do you get to them? People must identify with whatever the issue is at hand for starters. Then to get them away from their soapboxes, to get them to think for themselves….. and then, to get them in large groups, 10,000 lots, no less, to stand up and speak up! We have a long ways to go. Or not!

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