Saturday, January 8, 2022

MAKE IT: Latkes

latkesLatkes are not just a holiday food! A dish that is part of the Hanukkah celebration, this traditional recipe for latkes makes latkes that are crispy and fried to perfection. My kiddos love to eat these year-round. For a vegan version, use flax eggs (1 flax egg = 1 Tablespoon ground flaxseed/3 Tablespoons water. Mix flax and water and let sit for at least 10 minutes, or until congealed). Although latkes are usually fried (as they are in this recipe), I have also baked the vegan version with decent results (they have turned out best in convection ovens). Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound potatoes, scrubbed (Russet are best; 2 large Russet are around a pound)
  • 1 onion, peeled and quartered
  • 2 eggs (OR 2 flax eggs)
  • ½ cup flour (OR matzo meal)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt (plus more for sprinkling)
  • Oil for frying

Directions:

  1. Using a large grater, grate potatoes and onions (you can also use the coarse blade setting of a food processor).
  2. Dump grated potatoes and onions onto a clean dish towel, and squeeze out as much liquid as possible.
  3. Transfer the drained shredded potatoes and onions into a bowl, and add the eggs, flour, baking powder, pepper, and salt. Mix well.
  4. Heat oil (around ¼ inch deep) in a heavy-bottomed frying pan (I use cast iron), over medium heat.
  5. When oil is hot, carefully drop the potato mixture into the oil, one teaspoon at a time. Flatten with a spatula, and cook until the edges of the latkes are brown (around 5 minutes). Flip and cook until bottom side is brown. Remove cooked latke, and place on paper towel-lined plate. Continue to repeat process until all potato mixture is cooked.
  6. Sprinkle cooked latkes with additional salt and serve warm (we dip ours in either applesauce or marinara sauce).

*Recipe adapted from the New York Times

 

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MB (Marybeth) holds graduate and doctoral degrees in public health nutrition and public health education. Her work for Cornell University Extension allows her to provide nutrition and healthy living education to members of the Warren County community. When not working, this ADK 46-R can be found climbing all over the mountains of the Northeastern United States, munching on eggplant bacon, or doing zoomies with her shollie, Sig.




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