Sunday, June 5, 2022

Gov. Hochul announces largest number of new solar projects to date

solar panels

22 large-scale projects will power more than 620,000 New York homes

Governor Kathy Hochul announced awards for 22 large-scale solar and energy storage projects that will deliver enough clean, affordable energy to power over 620,000 New York homes for at least 20 years. As the state’s largest land-based renewable energy procurement to date, these projects will spur over $2.7 billion in private investment and create over 3,000 short- and long-term jobs across the state. The awards accelerate progress to exceed New York’s goal to obtain 70 percent of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030 on the path to a zero-emission grid by 2040 as required by Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act. These awards will strengthen the state’s current pipeline of renewables to power over 66 percent of New York’s electricity from renewable sources.

The 22 large-scale renewable energy projects by region are:

Capital Region

  • Stern Solar: Stern Solar LLC, a CS Energy affiliate, will build a 19.99-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County.
  • Fort Edward Solar Farm: Fort Edward Solar LLC, a Boralex affiliate, will build a 100-megawatt Solar facility in the towns of Fort Edward and Argyle, Washington County.
  • Scotch Ridge Solar: Scotch Ridge Solar LLC, a Nexamp affiliate, will build a 20-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Duanesburg, Schenectady County.
  • ELP Stuyvesant Solar: ELP Stuyvesant Solar LLC, an East Light Partners affiliate, will build a 19.99-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Stuyvesant, Columbia County.
  • Easton Solar Farm: Easton Solar LLC, a Boralex affiliate, will build a 20-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Easton, Washington County.
  • ELP Rotterdam Solar: ELP Rotterdam Solar LLC, an East Light Partners affiliate, will build a 19.99-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Rotterdam, Schenectady County.

Central New York

  • Harvest Hills Solar 2: ConnectGen Cayuga County LLC, a ConnectGen affiliate, will build a 100-megawatt Solar facility in the towns of Genoa and Venice, Cayuga County.
  • SunEast Scipio Solar: SED NY Holdings LLC, a SunEast Development affiliate, will build an 18-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Scipio, Cayuga County.

Mohawk Valley

  • Mill Point Solar 2: ConnectGen Montgomery County LLC, a ConnectGen affiliate, will build a 100-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Glen, Montgomery County.
  • SunEast Flat Creek II Solar: SunEast Flat Creek Solar LLC, a SunEast Development affiliate, will build a 100-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Root, Montgomery County.
  • Newport Solar Farm: Newport Deerfield Solar LLC, a Boralex affiliate, will build a 130-megawatt Solar facility in the towns of Deerfield, Marcy and Newport, Oneida and Herkimer County.
  • Foothills Solar Farm: Foothills Solar LLC, a Boralex affiliate, will build a 40-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Mayfield, Fulton County.
  • Columbia Solar Energy Center: Columbia Solar Energy Center LLC, an EDF Renewables affiliate, will build a 350-megawatt Solar facility with 20 megawatts of co-located energy storage in the towns of Columbia and Litchfield, Herkimer County.

North Country

  • Rich Road Solar Energy Center: Rich Road Solar Energy Center LLC, an EDF Renewables affiliate, will build a 240-megawatt Solar facility with 20 megawatts of co-located Storage in the town of Canton, St. Lawrence County.
  • Fort Covington Solar Farm: Fort Covington Solar LLC, a Boralex affiliate, will build a 250-megawatt Solar facility with 77 megawatts of co-located Storage in the town of Fort Covington, Franklin County.
  • Roosevelt Solar: ReneSola Power Holdings LLC, a ReneSola Power affiliate, will build a 19.99-megawatt Solar facility with 2 megawatts of co-located Storage in the town of Massena, St. Lawrence County.
  • Moss Ridge Solar: Moss Ridge Solar 1 LLC, a Borrego Solar affiliate, will build a 60-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Dekalb, St. Lawrence County.

Southern Tier

  • Yellow Barn Solar: Yellow Barn Solar LLC, a CS Energy affiliate, will build a 160-megawatt Solar facility in the towns of Lansing and Groton, Tompkins County.

Western New York

  • Ridge View Solar Energy Center: Ridge View Solar Energy Center, LLC, an EDF Renewables affiliate, will build a 350-megawatt Solar facility with 20 megawatts of co-located Storage in the town of Hartland, Niagara County.
  • Bear Ridge Solar: Bear Ridge Solar LLC, a Cypress Creek Renewables affiliate, will build a 100-megawatt Solar facility in the town of Cambria and Pendleton, Niagara County.
  • Alfred Oaks Solar: Alfred Oaks Solar LLC, a Northland Power affiliate, will build a 100-megawatt Solar facility with 20 megawatts of co-located Storage in the town of Alfred, Allegany County.
  • York Run Solar: York Run Solar LLC, a CS Energy affiliate, will build a 90-megawatt Solar facility in the towns of Busti and Kiantone, Chautauqua County.

These newly awarded projects will add to New York’s robust pipeline of large-scale renewable energy projects moving towards operation, comprised of over 120 solar, land-based wind and offshore wind projects under development that will deliver over 14,200 megawatts of clean power to the grid when completed – enough to power nearly five and a half million New York homes. The State’s commitment to building out new green energy transmission, led by 250 miles of new major upgrades already underway throughout the state, with recently announced Clean Path New York and Champlain Hudson Power Express green energy infrastructure projects, will allow the current pipeline of renewables to power over 66 percent of New York’s electricity from renewable sources once operational.

Explorer file photo by Mike Lynch

 

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Community news stories come from press releases and other notices from organizations, businesses, state agencies and other groups. Submit your contributions to Almanack Editor Melissa Hart at editor@adirondackalmanack.com.




21 Responses

  1. Tracie says:

    Honestly what do these solar fields do to help New York. You have to buy into them then they supposeably give you a credit towards National Grid. My savings $10. It’s not worth doing the whole application. My electric will still go out if there’s an outage. My bill is still high. Please explain how we benefit. All these solar fields look so unappealing in the Adirondacks. Taking away from the natural beauty.

    • Joan Grabe says:

      I thought that solar power was of no use in the Adirondacks as I shivered through or grumbled at the overcast or rain on an August day but on a sunny day ? To capture a free source of radiant energy to heat and light homes ? To power appliances and electronics ? Magic !
      On the beautiful Coastal plain south of Brindisi in Puglia, Italy are acres and acres if solar panels alongside the major highway – beautiful in their utility. If our beautiful Adirondacks can link with a natural resource the sun provides gratis what could be a better solution ? More drilling, fracking, pipe lines, acid rain ???

      • Johnl says:

        By the same token, nuke, natural gas, and coal powered electric plants are ‘beautiful in their utility’, AND take up a lot less space. Just sayin’.

        • Pat Smith says:

          Exactly, there is a small gas turbine facility in our village that provides energy for a local company and the rest goes on the grid. The facility footprint is about 3 acres and can easily produce 60 megs continuously.

      • Pat Smith says:

        Wonderful until we use up so much farmland that we are no longer able to feed ourselves. Additionally companies are already clearing wood lots and brush/grassland habitats in order to cover them with solar panels. The push for solar is driven by the huge financial incentives our state government is offering ( which you and I pay for in taxes) Incentives for wind have dried up, so development in that sector is going nowhere. Hydro is barely ever mentioned. I believe the monies the state is throwing around should be used to install solar on as many public and private buildings and homes as possible. The biggest loads are morning and evenings, when solar generation is at its weakest. That means either building huge battery storage facilities or use rolling black outs to manage demand. The Adirondacks rely on tourism as a major part of their economy. How many people will travel here from a distance when they have to stop several times, each stop taking several hours to recharge their vehicle. If you live in upstate NY do you think electric snowplow trucks will be effective in battling blizzard conditions? There has to be a balance of energy supply because solar, wind and hydro alone will never cover the demand.

  2. JB says:

    For context, these new solar projects account for roughly 2.4 GW summer capacity, which, based on actual NYS solar energy generation numbers from 2021, will likely amount to roughly 0.8 TWh of energy generated annually (0.6% of NYS electrical energy demand for the year 2021). These projects will likely have a collective footprint of more than 16,000 acres.

  3. Zephyr says:

    Great! I look forward to more renewable energy replacing fossil fuels that are killing the planet. Every time I see a solar or wind installation I smile. Unlike many others on here I am not knee-jerk against any and all progress.

  4. Paul says:

    These are all good, but again we are just nipping at the edges. We have a crisis here, nuclear power is the only way quickly to solve the problem (and it works with the grid we already have). It’s the reason some European countries have already reached their climate goals. Clock is ticking.

    • Pat Smith says:

      Thank you Paul, this is the best alternative that is being completely overlooked. Advances in technology and processes are making nuclear safer than ever before.

  5. Charlie Stehlin says:

    “By the same token, nuke, natural gas, and coal powered electric plants are ‘beautiful in their utility’.”

    Yeah but how long can their use persist Johnl without the effects of them radically changing the way future generations exist? We know the environmental hazards from them. We know the dangers of nuclear energy. Michio Kaku, a physicist, once said this about nuclear accidents: “People don’t realize that accidents that happen sometimes just keep on going, like Chernobyl for example. The reactor actually goes critical when it rains. It went critical last year. I was shocked when the Reuters news-wire service carried the story, but there it was. Rain water will slow down neutrons, and slow neutrons can fission more than fast neutrons, which is the opposite of common sense; so when it rains water seeps into the core at Chernobyl, reflects the neutrons, slows them down and the chain reaction starts up again, and radiation levels surge by a factor of ten in the slow reactor and the director of the reactor was quoted as saying, ‘at some point we’re going to have to go in with bulldozers and for once and for all put that core to rest.’ The core at Chernobyl is stable because the Red Air Force came out, they came out with helicopters and jets to sandbag that reactor; they put sand all over it with Boron, and borated sand will then seal the cement, and that’s what’s keeping the tomb intact, but it could go critical. In fact it did go slightly critical last year (early 2000’s) when radiation levels began to rise. At 3-mile Island the core has been physically removed; most of the radiation is gone, however there are fragments of uranium still left in the core, and believe it or not there is sufficient uranium at 3-mile Island with most of the core removed, lobotomized so to speak, to also create criticality; so a nuclear accident is forever. Even at 3-mile Island there are still dangers of criticality.”

    It was put to Kaku back then: ‘Why don’t they ever tell us these things?’
    “Because it would scare people I think. My professors are the ones who created these things and they thought that these reactors would be built underground because they’re quite unstable, it would be built underground so in case of an accident you just put a manhole cover on it and walk away from it.’

    Out of sight out of mind to most of us in other words. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder Johnl.

    • Zephyr says:

      Yes, of course the Titanic was unsinkable, and tsunamis and earthquakes are rare, and Russia will never attack Ukraine, and what are the chances someone could take down the World Trade Center with airplanes? One thing that is certain is that we still don’t have a method of safely storing nuclear waste for thousands of years, but of course we can leave that problem to future generations to deal with.

      • Boreas says:

        Indeed – the fossil fuel industry has scared the bejeezus out of us WRT nuclear energy!! We can bury harmful chemicals deep in the ground or release them directly into the atmosphere by the millions of tons! Frankly, I think they will do much less harm sequestered fairly safely under ground and not constantly contributing to greenhouse warming.

        There is a SLIGHT RISK of radiation release compared to greenhouse emissions occurring 24/7/365. It would take a lot of radiation to damage the earth as much as we have with fossil fuels to date, let alone into the future.

        Nuclear power is not likely to be the final answer unless we can get to fusion. But It should be considered in our arsenal of stopgap weapons. It can produce huge amounts of power with a surprisingly small footprint.

        But more importantly, the BIG problem ignored by most is the fact that the greenhouse gases already present in the atmosphere aren’t going anywhere by themself. Something must remove them. Are the Fossil Fuel Industries going to be forced to clean up their existing mess? Wake me if anyone in government even suggests it!! We all drank deeply from the well, now our descendants will live with the consequences.

    • JohnL says:

      Re: Both your comments. You win Charlie. I got nothin’ in return for these. Just WOW!!

  6. Charlie Stehlin says:

    Pat Smith says: “I believe the monies the state is throwing around should be used to install solar on as many public and private buildings and homes as possible.”

    > Not to send off negative vibes as is so often assumed with realist me, but what if a nuclear war occurs, which is not a far-fetched thought nowadays? Or if some fruitcake, who hates life and wants to die and wishes to take everyone, or as many people as possible, with him when he goes, who happens to find his way to ‘the button’, pushes it and all of a sudden….nukes raining down? What if? If any of us survive there will be cloud-cover over the whole planet. What good will solar panels be then when there will be no sunlight to make them happy? We should have a backup plan in case solar energy fails us! Always there should be a backup plan as history ‘should’ teach us…if that will even matter in the end game, whenever and whatever that may be!

  7. Charlie Stehlin says:

    Paul says: “Clock is ticking.”

    Sure is! Who is right who is wrong? What is truth what is fiction? Only time will tell….the clock ticking. Nuclear waste never goes away Paul, and there’s always accidents! Recall all of them oil people, including our politicians who are smothered in oil, who swear, “It’s the safest way…” yet always an accident, or eventually an accident. (Think the Crow Indian Reservation spill last year, or the Keystone spill a few years ago, or the BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico ten or so years ago…. to cite a few mere examples!) Once the damage done, never the same!

    Let’s face it, our technologies are apt to err, and again and again they do do, no matter how much the capitalists rich try to convince us otherwise before they err. Short memories do not pertain to all of us!

  8. Charlie Stehlin says:

    “of course we can leave that problem to future generations to deal with.”

    But of course Zephyr. It’s what we do best!

  9. Tom Paine says:

    There is also hamsters or humans walking or running on tread mills to generate electricity.

    • Zephyr says:

      If we could only harvest the power generated by people typing comments on the Internet! And most comments generate more heat than light…

  10. Susan says:

    Speaking of leaving the problem to future generations, it is my understanding that these solar panels being installed now have an average life span of 20 years. They are not reusable. Who is going to take care of “disposing” of this HUGE amount of matter in an eco- friendly way? Most of the components come from China. Will they clean up the mess? Doubt it.

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