Monday, August 22, 2022

Valcour Island stewardship work addresses critical maintenance needs

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) — with support from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), the Lake Champlain Basin Program and volunteers — has completed long overdue maintenance of campsites on the historic Valcour Island.

 

Valcour Island, located southeast of Plattsburgh near Lake Champlain’s western shore, offers abundant opportunities for paddlers, campers and anglers. The NFCT’s stewardship crew rehabilitated more than 10 campsites over the course of six days, and made numerous improvements elsewhere on the island.

 

“Valcour Island is one of Lake Champlain’s finest recreation areas and is an important tourist destination,” said Noah Pollock, NFCT’s stewardship director. “We were happy to put our crew and volunteers to work to help the NYSDEC complete a variety of important maintenance tasks.”

 

The NFCT’s stewardship crew replaced rotting privies, reconstructed crumbling fire pits, and removed old docks and debris from campsites.

NFCT’s stewardship crew and volunteers replaced rotting privies on campsites at Valcour Island. Photo provided by Chris Morris, Northern Forest Canoe Trail Communications Director.

 

“We had two major goals with this work: improve amenities for users and reduce the impacts of heavy recreational use,” Pollock added. “We were able to accomplish both thanks to our stewardship crew and the volunteers who joined us, along with the support we received from the Lake Champlain Committee, the Lake Champlain Basin Program and NYSDEC.”

“The LCBP is proud to help restore this landmark recreational resource on Lake Champlain,” said Dr. Eric Howe, LCBP’s director. “Visitors for years to come will benefit from this work, creating memories and forging connections to the lake that sustains us.”

 

This work was part of a larger, regional project focused on community engagement, public access improvement and water quality, focused on the Saranac River, Lake Champlain and the Missisquoi River. Funding from the Lake Champlain Basin Program allowed the NFCT to train and deploy stewardship interns and volunteers to complete this work.

 

“As it is with nearly all of our stewardship work, the Valcour Island project would not have been possible without a concerted effort from stakeholders from all different spheres,” Pollock said. “We’re proud of what we accomplished, and we’re excited for folks to discover — and rediscover — everything Valcour Island has to offer.”

NFCT’s stewardship crew and volunteers worked on signage at campsites on the historic Valcour Island. Photo provided by Chris Morris, Northern Forest Canoe Trail Communications Director.

To learn more about the NFCT’s stewardship work, contact Noah Pollock at noah@northernforestcanoetrail.org, or visit northernforestcanoetrail.org.

 

About the Northern Forest Canoe Trail:

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail is a nonprofit organization that maintains and promotes the 740-mile water trail that runs from Old Forge, NY, to Fort Kent, Maine, and connects New York, Vermont, Quebec, New Hampshire and Maine. The trail showcases the mix of landscapes and communities currently lining the traditional routes used by Indigenous peoples, settlers and guides. It is the longest in-land water trail in the nation and consists of 23 rivers and streams, 59 lakes and ponds, 45 communities and 65 portages. To learn more, visit northernforestcanoetrail.org.

Photo at top: Fire ring build at Campsite 26 at the historic Valcour Island. Photo provided by Chris Morris, Northern Forest Canoe Trail Communications Director.

Related Stories


Community news stories come from press releases and other notices from organizations, businesses, state agencies and other groups. Submit your contributions to Almanack Editor Melissa Hart at editor@adirondackalmanack.com.




Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Wait, before you go,

sign up for news updates from the Adirondack Almanack!