Friday, June 30, 2023

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

Subscribe to the Adirondack Almanack daily news e-mail. Follow Us on Twitter and Facebook.

Related Stories


Melissa is a journalist with experience as a reporter and editor with the Burlington Free Press, Ithaca Journal and Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. She worked as a communications specialist for the Adirondack North Country Association and is currently digital editor for Adirondack Explorer, overseeing both the Explorer's website and its community forum the Adirondack Almanack. She enjoys hiking, camping and other outdoors activities, and spending time with her husband, their twin daughters, and rescue animals -- two dogs and two cats.




2 Responses

  1. louis curth says:

    MAY I SUGGEST THIS ARTICLE TO ALL WHO CARE ABOUT THE FUTURE OF THE ADIRONDACKS:

    https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/572392-time-to-change-how-we-fight-wildfires/

    “TIME TO CHANGE HOW WE FIGHT WILDFIRES”, BY Toddi Steelman, 09/15/21. She raises Some important points:

    * Conditions have changed. The way we fight wildfires must change, too.

    * Creating a new and more resilient path forward begins by acknowledging the ecological and social changes that have taken place in the landscape over the last half-century. Fires are larger, less predictable and more intense today; long-time first responders tell us they’ve never seen conditions like this before. Fire seasons last longer, creating a dangerous imbalance in the supply of and demand for firefighting resources, especially at peak times of the year. And more people are living in harm’s way as human development encroaches farther and farther into the wildland-urban interface. All of this complicates the already challenging conditions our wildland firefighters face.

    * Communities need to proactively reduce their risk factors and build greater capacity for resilience.
    This includes creating and maintaining defensible spaces, reducing hazardous fuels, revising building and construction codes, as well as working with first responders to set priorities for community protection and identify trigger points for community evacuation.

    * We need to recognize and more compassionately respond to the growing risks faced by wildland firefighters.
    Whether they are professionals or volunteers, the men and woman who battle wildfires today also battle extreme physical and mental stresses.

    * Injury, exhaustion and burn-out are increasingly likely as wildfires grow larger and more frequent and as fire seasons grow longer, leaving less time in between for recovery. Firefighters are blamed for not getting on fires fast enough or otherwise failing to meet unreasonable expectations.

    * The risk of fire fatalities looms large and, when tragedy strikes, it can trigger intense grief, frustration, guilt, rage and despair, as can recriminations from a public that increasingly blames firefighters when a fire can’t be controlled. It should come as no surprise that we now see rising rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, depression and suicide in the wildland firefighting community.

    * To reduce these stresses, federal and state agencies must hire more firefighters and provide them the resources they need — not just equipment, but also sufficient time-off and expanded professional counseling services — to do the job they are trained for and take such pride in.

    * At a time of unprecedented ecological change and an increasingly unstable climate, the costs associated with taking these actions and creating more resilient ecosystems, communities and firefighters are an investment in our future.

    (Toddi Steelman is president of the International Association of Wildland Fire and the Stanback Dean of Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment.)

  2. louis curth says:

    MAY I SUGGEST THIS ARTICLE TO ADK. ALMANACK READERS:

    https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/572392-time-to-change-how-we-fight-wildfires/

    “TIME TO CHANGE HOW WE FIGHT WILDFIRES”, BY Toddi Steelman, 09/15/21. She raises some important points:

    * Conditions have changed. The way we fight wildfires must change, too.

    * Creating a new and more resilient path forward begins by acknowledging the ecological and social changes that have taken place in the landscape over the last half-century. Fires are larger, less predictable and more intense today; long-time first responders tell us they’ve never seen conditions like this before. Fire seasons last longer, creating a dangerous imbalance in the supply of and demand for firefighting resources, especially at peak times of the year. And more people are living in harm’s way as human development encroaches farther and farther into the wildland-urban interface. All of this complicates the already challenging conditions our wildland firefighters face.

    * Communities need to proactively reduce their risk factors and build greater capacity for resilience.
    This includes creating and maintaining defensible spaces, reducing hazardous fuels, revising building and construction codes, as well as working with first responders to set priorities for community protection and identify trigger points for community evacuation.

    * We need to recognize and more compassionately respond to the growing risks faced by wildland firefighters.
    Whether they are professionals or volunteers, the men and woman who battle wildfires today also battle extreme physical and mental stresses.

    * Injury, exhaustion and burn-out are increasingly likely as wildfires grow larger and more frequent and as fire seasons grow longer, leaving less time in between for recovery. Firefighters are blamed for not getting on fires fast enough or otherwise failing to meet unreasonable expectations.

    * The risk of fire fatalities looms large and, when tragedy strikes, it can trigger intense grief, frustration, guilt, rage and despair, as can recriminations from a public that increasingly blames firefighters when a fire can’t be controlled. It should come as no surprise that we now see rising rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, depression and suicide in the wildland firefighting community.

    * To reduce these stresses, federal and state agencies must hire more firefighters and provide them the resources they need — not just equipment, but also sufficient time-off and expanded professional counseling services — to do the job they are trained for and take such pride in.

    * At a time of unprecedented ecological change and an increasingly unstable climate, the costs associated with taking these actions and creating more resilient ecosystems, communities and firefighters are an investment in our future.
    ###############
    (Toddi Steelman is president of the International Association of Wildland Fire and the Stanback Dean of Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment.)

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox