Friday, December 1, 2023

State Poll Shows Housing Affordability A Major Concern

Marist Poll logo

According to a statewide poll of 1,780 adults conducted by the Marist Poll earlier this month, 73% of New York residents report that the affordability of housing is a major problem in
their communities. This concern is widespread among all geographic areas of the state, with 67% of rural residents, 69% of suburban residents and 81% of urban residents feeling housing affordability is a major issue.

 

“The poll results show New Yorkers, no matter where they live, view housing affordability as a major problem, and yet state policymakers have yet to address this issue,” commented Michael J. Borges, Rural Housing Coalition Executive Director.

 

The Adirondack Explorer launched a series that shows how Adirondack housing issues are connected to other community challenges. As part of the reporting, the articles also highlight efforts underway to offer potential solutions. 

The lack of action did not go unnoticed in the poll. 71% of New Yorkers believe that state government is not providing enough resources to address the lack of affordable housing. Again, majorities in all areas of the state feel the same way, with 71% of rural residents, 77% of urban residents and 66% of suburban residents believing the state is not doing enough to address the housing crisis. The survey also showed that New Yorkers are divided on how to the state government should address the housing affordability issue. 39% of adults report the government should prioritize rental assistance, 33% believe more owner-occupied housing development should be the priority, and 24% say new rental housing development should be the state government’s top priority.

 

“The Governor should convene a Housing Task Force that brings together a representative group of stakeholders to the table that can recommend solutions to the housing crisis that meets the needs of all New Yorkers, no matter where they live,” stated Mr. Borges.

 

In the meantime, the 2024 Executive Budget should increase funding for housing programs, particularly those that meet the needs of underserved areas, like rural communities, where small amounts of funding can go a long way.

 

“We are hopeful that unlike last year, the upcoming Executive Budget will not cut funding for housing programs in the midst of a housing crisis that a clear majority of New Yorkers believe the state needs to do more to address and not less,” concluded Mr. Borges.

 

Rural Housing Coalition of New York Statewide Survey

Summary of Key Findings

Nearly Three in Four New Yorkers Believe Affordability of Housing is a Major Problem

More than seven in ten (73%) New York State adults report that the affordability of housing is a major problem in their local communities. New York residents who rent their primary residence (83%) are more likely than those who own their primary residence (66%) to believe housing affordability is a major problem. Regardless of geographic location, over six in ten New Yorkers report the affordability of housing is a major issue. 81% of urban, 69% of suburban, and 67% of rural residents all see the issue as a major problem. New York City residents (78%) are the most likely to feel this way, followed closely by 75% of residents in the suburban counties surrounding the city, as well as 66% of Upstate residents.

RHC logo

Photo provided by Michael J. Borges, Rural Housing Coalition of New York Executive Director.

Majority of New Yorkers Think NYS Gov Not Doing Enough to Address Lack of Affordable Housing

71% of New York State adults think the state’s government is not providing enough resources to address the lack of affordable housing. 77% of self-reported urban residents, 71% of rural residents, and 66% of suburban residents are in agreement. Residents who rent their primary residence (80%) are more likely than those who own their home (64%) to believe the state government is not providing enough resources to address the issue. Bipartisan consensus also exists on this issue with 72% of Democrats, 69% of non-enrolled voters, and 63% of Republicans believing the NYS government needs to do more to address the issue of affordable housing within the state.

 

Residents Divide Over How NYS Government Should Address Housing Affordability Issue

A plurality of New York State residents (39%) believes the government should prioritize increasing funding for rental assistance vouchers for those in need of assistance in paying their rent. 33% of
residents believe increasing funding for the development of new homes for purchase should be prioritized, and 24% believe increasing funding for new rental housing should be at the top of the list
when addressing the housing affordability problem. Among residents who report they live in rural areas, 42% want the government to prioritize increasing rental assistance vouchers, 31% prioritize an increase in funding for the development of new homes for purchase, and 22% think increasing funding for the development of new rental housing should be the top priority.

 

A plurality (47%) of New Yorkers who rent their primary residence want to see rental assistance vouchers as the top priority, while 26% of renters want to see increased funding for rental housing, and 25% wanting to see increased funding for the develop of new homes for purchase as the top priority. Homeowners within the state are slightly more divided than their renting counterparts. A plurality (38%) prioritize increasing funding for the development of new homes for purchase, 33% report increasing rental assistance vouchers as the top solution, and 22% want state government to increase funding for new rental housing to address the issue of affordable housing.

 

How the Survey was Conducted

Nature of the Sample: Marist Poll of 1,780 New York State Adults

This survey of 1,780 New York State adults was conducted November 13th through November 15th, 2023 by the Marist Poll sponsored by the Rural Housing Coalition of New York. Adults 18 years of age and older residing in New York State were contacted through a multi-mode design: By phone using live interviewers, by text, or online. Survey questions were available in English and Spanish. Phone and online samples were selected to ensure that each region was represented in proportion to its adult population. The samples were then combined and balanced to reflect the 2020 American Community Survey 5-year estimates for age, gender, income, race, and region. Results are statistically significant within ±3.0 percentage points. There are 1,556 registered voters. The results for this subset are statistically significant within ±3.2 percentage points. Tables include results for subgroups to only display crosstabs with an acceptable sampling error. It should be noted that although you may not see results listed for a certain group, it does not mean interviews were not completed with those individuals. It simply means the sample size is too small to report. The error margin was adjusted for sample weights and increases for cross-tabulations.

Photo at top: Marist Poll logo. Marist Poll website photo.

 

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Community news stories come from press releases and other notices from organizations, businesses, state agencies and other groups. Submit your contributions to Almanack Editor Melissa Hart at editor@adirondackalmanack.com.




12 Responses

  1. Nthan says:

    Sorry but NYS Gov. Hockel is more worried about forcing Tax Payers to subsidize expensive electric cars for the rich( with little regard for majority who cannot afford ) Forcing people to longer be able to use Gas stoves (with a farce that they are killing everyone with indoor air polution). forcing everyone to start using heat pumps and raising their utility bills yet again. Oh let’s not forget the illegal attempts to disarm NYS and adding a new Back ground tax on ammo to further burden the honest gun owners. so Far a sheer Bully who really has missed the real issues.

    Yes there is global warming issues, let give tax breaks for people to insulate their homes(thereby lowering fuel use forever).
    Let maybe make a law raising minimum MPG on all vehicles sold in nys.
    Let put more police and judges who can PUT AWAY the rapant criminals. real penalties for shop lifting, organized shoplifting and put them away so everyone can have local stores and lower prices.
    Not give rich corporations huge tax breaks but raise homeowners taxes to make up the GAP!
    How about we vote better in the next election?

    Increasing the load on the power grid by a 1,000 times for electric everything, where is that infracstructure and power coming from? solar panels that only work a few hour a day when most e-cars are charged at night??? We would need a dozen nuclear power plants at a minimum.

  2. Rob says:

    Ranta vouchers should not be used. Especially if they are paid through tax payer dollars

  3. JohnL says:

    ‘ increasing funding for rental assistance vouchers’ ; ‘increasing funding for the development of new homes’; ‘increasing funding for new rental housing’.

    I’ve got an unusual (for NY State) idea. How about instead let’s lower the tax burden in NYS so people can better afford housing on their own. Maybe elect a few more fiscal conservatives (GASP!!) to our esteemed State Legislature.

    • Boreas says:

      Everyone likes the sound of paying less tax. But in my opinion, increasing wages while decreasing the income gap is a better option. You can’t have nice things like roads, bridges, public services, public education, etc. without taxes. When you earn an actual living wage, taxes become more affordable AND you can begin to better afford housing and healthy food IF you were taught good fiscal planning in school.

      Paying a King’s ransom to get a college degree in order to make a reasonable wage has become a big problem as well. Many jobs require degrees for no good reason. Try “working your way through college” today – it will take a lifetime.

  4. JohnL says:

    I’m at a youth hockey game in Vermont so if I hit a few unwanted keys, you’ll have to forgive me. Hi Boreas . I didn’t say no taxes. I said LESS taxes . NYS has the highest overall tax burden of the 50 states. Plus, our highways are in horrible shape. Our bridges are collapsing. And, if you believe in the capitalist system, you don’t set wages . The free market sets them. I couldn’t agree more about the cost of college. Colleges have endowments in the tens of billions of dollars and still charge exorbitant tuitions for degrees that can’t earn enough to support the owner of the degree. Oops, gotta go. The games about to start. More at a later day. Have a great day.

    • JohnL says:

      Meant to include this link earlier but like I said I was at a kids hockey game and it was COLD in the rink. I thought it disgraceful that we’re number 1 and very interesting that the only New England state that wasn’t in the upper ranks tax-wise was the Live Free or Die State. Good for them.
      https://wallethub.com/edu/states-with-highest-lowest-tax-burden/20494
      To Jeremy’s point, the only New England state that ISN’T a sanctuary state is New Hampshire. Coincidence? I think not.
      That’s it for the night. My grandsons team (12U) won both their hockey games today and sportsmanship was off ths charts. In a good way.

  5. Jeremy says:

    I wonder how the “migrant” invasion will help residents? Just kidding, I don’t. We are being diluted. Expect lower standards of living across the board. It’s the byproduct of accommodating them and their needs.

  6. Mike says:

    In a state with over 8 million people Marist surveyed 1780 people. That sounds credible. Why not survey 178 next time?

    • JohnL says:

      The accuracy and value of statistics depends not so much on the number of samples collected, but from where it’s gathered and who is trying to prove what. If you don’t have good sampling practices, you don’t have meaningful results. A good general rule is that anything a politician, or a State, puts out, for instance, is immediately questionable.

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