Thursday, March 21, 2024

Lake Champlain clean up

DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos announces the release of a new Lake Champlain watershed plan at Ausable Point Campground on Monday.

Plans for Lake Champlain

A new state plan outlines priority projects in the Lake Champlain watershed to help control phosphorus pollution into the nation’s 13th-largest lake.

After soliciting public feedback last year, the state Department of Environmental Conservation on Monday released the final version of its Lake Champlain Watershed Implementation Plan.

The plan offers the latest assessment of conditions and pollution sources on Lake Champlain and outlines projects that could help reduce phosphorus loading into the lake, a key pollutant that contributes to increasing harmful algae growth and declining water clarity. A 2002 federal pollution control plan set phosphorus targets for both New York and Vermont.

DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos, who is set to step down from the position soon, visited the Ausable Point Campground on Monday to champion the plan and the state’s investments to protect water quality.

“You have to do everything you can to protect this body of water, safeguard it for generations to come,” Seggos said.

Read more here.

DEC fisheries staff hosted an information session in Warrensburg this weekend.

DEC fisheries staff hosted an information session in Warrensburg this weekend.

And a plan for brook trout

I stopped by an information session in Warrensburg this weekend on DEC’s new approach to Adirondack lake-dwelling brook trout. I will lay out the details in an upcoming story, so keep an eye out for that.

Fisheries staff offered a three-hour presentation and answered questions from a crowd of around 75 trout anglers, explaining their proposed approach to managing the iconic cold-water fish species for the coming 15 years.

They hope to establish stricter controls over the introduction of baitfish into sensitive lake ecosystems that house native brook trout. Right now, baitfish is restricted in a hodgepodge of special regulations applying to specific ponds or lakes or entire land classifications – like wilderness ponds.

The agency’s new proposal would prohibit the use of baitfish across the board, exempting a subset of lakes larger than 50 acres in size and with a history of stocking of other fish species. Officials hope the rules will be easier to understand, more efficient to enforce and more protective of trout populations.

Keep an eye for a potential third information session after strong turnout at the ones in Old Forge and Warrensburg.

Next steps: Finalize draft plan. Release for public comment. Incorporate public comment. Finalize plan. Propose new regulations, if any. Release for public comment. Incorporate public comment. Finalize new regulations, if any.

map of Adirondack Park

 

 

Photo at top: DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos announces the release of a new Lake Champlain watershed plan at Ausable Point Campground on Monday. Photo by Zachary Matson.

This first appeared in Zach’s weekly “Water Line” newsletter. Click here to sign up.

Related Stories


Zachary Matson has been an environmental reporter for the Explorer since October 2021. He is focused on the many issues impacting water and the people, plants and wildlife that rely on it in the Adirondack Park. Zach worked at daily newspapers in Missouri, Arizona and New York for nearly a decade, most recently working as the education reporter for six years at the Daily Gazette in Schenectady.




2 Responses

  1. Steven Frederick says:

    They should be looking at factory farms that haul raw sewage or to be nice manure. In a lot of cases it is hauled by tractor trailers from the factory farms miles to be spread on fields that leach down into wells and brooks and then it works its way to Lake Champlain

  2. Steven Frederick says:

    I pray that they have the courage to go after the biggest source of phosphorus in the lake. 38 percent is from farm runoff and it’s going to get worse with the more factory farms.

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox