Almanack Contributor Anthony F. Hall

Anthony F. Hall

Anthony F. Hall is the editor and publisher of the Lake George Mirror.

Anthony grew up in Warrensburg and after an education that included studying with beat poet Gregory Corso on an island in the Aegean, crewing a schooner in Hawaii, traveling through Greece and Turkey studying Byzantine art and archeology, and a stint at Lehman Brothers, he returned to the Adirondacks and took a job with legendary state senator Ron Stafford.

In 1998, Anthony and his wife Lisa acquired the Lake George Mirror, once part of a chain of weekly newspapers owned by his father Rob Hall.

Established in the 1880s, the Mirror is America’s oldest resort newspaper.



Saturday, February 20, 2016

Adirondack Museum Reissues A Guide-Boat Classic

adk museum reissues guide boat classicThere’s nothing wooden about a tree, a friend who happens to be a poet once remarked. The same could be said about a true Adirondack guide-boat. There’s nothing wooden about it. The offspring of this region’s woods and waters, it is the most elegant rowing boat ever built. Handled properly, an anonymous sportsman once wrote, “it obeys the prompting of every impulse, and is so easily propelled in smooth water you need never tire.”

Easier said than done, of course. But even clumsy rowers, or those who have only rowed a metal clunker, find themselves besotted by the guide-boat’s lines, workmanship and history. Ask any one of the millions of people who have visited the Adirondack Museum, whose guide-boat collection is among its most popular attractions. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 6, 2016

Lake George Man Discovers The Family He Never Knew

Finding the Family He Never Knew Was HisOrphans in Dickens’ London never expected to be reunited with their true families. (If they did, there would no such thing as the Victorian novel.) It was not much different in the first decades of the 20th century, recalls Michael Doxie.

Doxie, a resident of Lake George, grew up in an orphanage run by an order of Anglican nuns, the Sisters of Charity, outside London.

He lived there until the age of 14, when he was sent out to fend for himself. At a manor house in the Cotswolds, he stoked coal furnaces and weeded the gardens.

“It was feudal,” said Doxie, now in his 80s. “There was no running water or electricity. I found lodgings for myself in the village and saved enough money to buy a bicycle. I wasn’t lonely, because I didn’t know anything different.” » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 4, 2016

Edward Shepard: The Man Behind Shepard Park, Erlowest

Edward M. Shepard and the Making of a People’s ParkIn 1955, the main building on the campus of the College of the City of New York was renamed Shepard Hall in honor of Edward Morse Shepard, the political reformer who died on Lake George in 1911.

Shepard graduated from City College in 1869 and was the chairman of its Board of Trustees from 1904 until his death.

When the building was renamed in his honor, Shepard had been dead for more than forty years. Presumably, his contributions to the institution were far greater than those of the average college trustee.

And according to Sidney Van Nort, who oversees City College’s archives and special collections, Shepard’s spirit pervades the campus, whether today’s students acknowledge that or not. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 1, 2015

The Gold Cup Race Boats of A.L. Judson

The Whip-Po-Will - Lake George Mirror File PhotoAfter Gar Wood won the 1915 Gold Cup Race on Long Island and carried the cup home to Detroit, A.L. Judson said, “I’m going to bring the Gold Cup back east. That’s where it belongs.” Judson meant that it belonged on Lake George.

A president of the American Power Boat Association (APBA) and a commodore of the Lake George Regatta, the sponsor of the lake’s first motor boat races on the lake, Judson is, nevertheless, a relatively obscure figure. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 29, 2015

A Small Scale Organic Farm In Chestertown

Landon Hill Farm photo by Anothony HallThe only certified organic farm in Warren County may be the smallest commercial farm in the county as well.

Operated by Rand Fosdick and Nancy Welch in Chestertown, the 10,000 square foot Landon Hill Estate Farm generates enough produce to stock the farm stand, provide weekly harvest baskets to subscribers and feed the couple and their friends.

Now in its second year of production, the farm is expected to register a profit next year, said Rand Fosdick. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 22, 2015

A Lake George Steam Whistle Recalls A Bygone Era

Lake George - The Adirondac - Lake George Mirror File PhotoFor some folks, the bright notes they hear whenever Shoreline Cruises’ Adirondac circles Bolton Bay have a familiar ring.

That’s because they’re piped from an old fashioned brass steam whistle that once belonged to the Pamelaine, the private steamboat of Bolton Landing’s own Mason ‘Doc’ Saunders.

The Adirondac’s pilots blow the whistle in honor of Saunders, who died in 2006. Back in the day, that is, in the 1960s and 70s,  Lake George experienced something of a steamboat revival, and Mason Saunders quickly became its ringmaster. » Continue Reading.


Friday, November 13, 2015

Amelia Earhart’s Visit To Lake George

Amelia Earhart on Lake GeorgeAmong the celebrities who have spent summers on Lake George, we can include Amelia Earhart, who visited the lake long before she became the most famous female aviator in the country.

For six months in 1919, she, her mother and sister rented a cottage in Huletts Landing. Earhart, then aged 22, took an automobile repair course in Massachusetts in the spring and then rejoined her family for the summer, intending to enter a pre-med program at Columbia University in the fall. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 20, 2015

Drinking Local: Springbrook Hollow Farm Distillery

Dave Bannon and Ken RohneWhen orthopedic surgeon Dave Bannon and his family bought a farm a few miles from Lake George some twenty-five years ago, generations of people from surrounding farms and communities had been bringing jugs to its springs, filling them up with drinking water.

“It’s perfect water; no iron, no sulphur,” said Bannon.

So after retiring a few years ago, while he was casting about for a new direction, a craft distillery, producing spirits from the farm’s unprocessed spring water, was one good option. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 31, 2015

Chet Ross: One Of Warren County’s Finest Pitchers

Chet Ross PitcherThe rector of his Bolton Landing parish, as well as his own father, concluded early that Chet Ross had nothing on his mind but baseball. “I was like a hound dog,” said Ross. “I only went home when I was hungry.”

That dedication allowed Ross to avoid trouble – he never once appeared before his uncle, Bolton Town Justice Jim Ross – and, more important, it enabled him to become one of Warren County’s finest pitchers ever.

The local press dubbed him “Bolton’s husky hurler.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Silver Bay YMCA First To Seek LID Certification

Lake George from Silver bayThe leaders of Silver Bay YMCA on Lake George are the first to seek LID certification from the Lake George Waterkeeper.

LID is an acronym for Low Impact Development, and the projects that disturb landscapes the least and leave the lake’s water quality undiminished will be LID certified – much as green buildings are LEED certified. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 19, 2015

A Short History of the Lake George Steamer Sagamore

Sagamore crew by Fred Thatcher published with permission of Bolton Historical SocietyAbout fifteen years ago, a few lake-shore residents commemorated a 100th anniversary – that of the launching of the steamboat Sagamore.

The launching took place at Pine Point in Lake George Village, and according to contemporary accounts, it drew the largest crowds to the village since the introduction of the trolley in 1901. Local schools were closed for the day so that children and their teachers could attend the great event. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 9, 2015

New Appreciation For Old Lake George Courthouse

Jim Martino head of the Lake George Buildings and Grounds department in the restored LG courtroomThe Lake George Historical Museum is housed in the former Warren County courthouse, built in the decades between 1845 and 1878.

To the annoyance and frustration of the directors of the Lake George Historical Association, which operates the museum, and the Supervisor and Board of the Town of Lake George, which owns the building, the courthouse has not always been treated with the respect a museum of local history, let alone a historic building, deserves.

In recent years though, things have begun to change. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Bolton Landing Plans New Visitor Center, Museum Wing

bolton landing parkThe construction of a new Bolton Landing Visitors Center and an addition to the town’s historical museum, both framed and unified by new landscaping in Rogers Park, will start this autumn.

The entire project is expected to cost approximately $2.2 million, said Bolton Supervisor Ron Conover. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Success In Lake George Campaign To Preserve Pinnacle

Pinnacle Lake georgeThe Pinnacle, the Bolton landmark visible from Lake George and the Cat and Thomas Mountains Preserve, will be safely protected from development in perpetuity.  More than five years after Ernest Oberer first proposed building houses on the ridgeline, the Lake George Land Conservancy exercised its option to purchase the property in May, two days before the option was scheduled to expire.

By then, the Conservancy had raised the funds necessary to purchase the property, helped in part by a $10,000 donation from the Sagamore, contributions from local residents and a matching grant from Neil and Jane Golub and two anonymous donors, said Sarah Hoffman, the Lake George Land Conservancy’s director of communications. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 26, 2015

Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England

I'll drink to thatIn 1845, there were 221 distilleries in New York State, local historian and folklorist Marjorie Lansing Porter noted in an issue of North Country Life in 1953.

Moreover, she wrote, “great-grandma made dandelion wine, blackberry cordial, wild grape wine and used persimmons, elderberries, juniper berries, pumpkins, corn-stalks, hickory nuts, sassafras bark, birch bark and many other leaves, roots and barks to make ‘light’ drinks. » Continue Reading.


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