Almanack Contributor Editorial Staff

Greg Dower

Stories under the Almanack's Editorial Staff byline come from press releases and other notices. To have your news noticed here at the Almanack contact our editor John Warren at adkalmanack@gmail.com.


Monday, September 30, 2019

Heritage, Harvest, & Horse Festival at Fort Ti

Heritage Harvest Horse FestivalFort Ticonderoga is set to host a Heritage, Harvest & Horse Festival on October 5th. The full day of autumn fun will be set in the midst of the King’s Garden heirloom apple trees and a landscape of mountains and Lake Champlain.

Guests are invited to discover the historical importance of horses and other working animals during demonstrations; meet friendly farm animals; stroll through Fort Ticonderoga’s farmers’ market featuring local food, beverages, and crafts; participate in family fun activities; and tackle the six-acre Heroic Corn Maze. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 30, 2019

Adirondack Social Sciences Workshop Planned

adirondack research consortiumThe Adirondack Research Consortium is set to hold a day-long social sciences workshop on Friday, October 4, 2019 from 10 am to 3 pm in the Sterling Tomkins Pine Room of the Joan Weill Student Center at Paul Smith’s College.

The day will include a keynote talk by author and Yale professor Dr. Bill Weber, lunch, and a panel discussion on ongoing and emerging social issues impacting the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 30, 2019

Traveling Erie Canal Talk Miner Museum

everything worthy of observation

In the pre-dawn hours of August 2nd, 1826, Alexander Stewart Scott stepped aboard the steamboat Chambly in Quebec City, Canada. He was beginning a journey that not only took him across New York State but also ultimately changed his view of America and her people.

A keen observer, the 21-year-old Scott meticulously recorded his travel experiences, observations about the people he encountered, impressions of things he saw, and reactions to events he witnessed. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 29, 2019

Franklin County Farm Trail Event October 5th

franklin county farm trailCornell Cooperative Extension of Franklin County has announced a Franklin County Farm Trail event, set for Saturday, October 5th, from 10 am to 4 pm. Attendees will be able to travel the self-guided trail across northern Franklin County to explore some beautiful farms producing a variety of products. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 27, 2019

Featured Trail: Village Trail, Boquet River Nature Preserve

willsboro village trail courtesy adirondack atlasThe Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy has opened a half-mile trail connecting Willsboro’s Main Street with the Boquet River Nature Preserve’s existing trail network.

The trail provides convenient access to the Conservancy’s 120-acre preserve, and gives a further boost to the village’s ongoing downtown revitalization. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 27, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, September 27, 2019

Acclaimed Tango-Jazz Quintet Playing Tannery Pond

Emilio Solla y Bien Sur at Jazz Standard in New York CityTannery Pond Center (TPC) is set to present Emilio Solla y Bien Sur! performing in concert on Saturday, September 28th at 7:30 pm. This tango-jazz quintet is led by Grammy-nominated composer and pianist Emilio Solla.

Based in New York City, Emilio Solla y Bien Sur! comes to North Creek after recent performances at venues like Dizzy’s, Jazz Standard, Birdland Jazz Club as well as many others around the country. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 27, 2019

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, September 26, 2019

Rangers Stop Wildfire, Make Several Rescues

forest ranger logoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 26, 2019

Foliage Season; Cooler Temperatures: Current Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (Sept 26)

conditions 9-27-19This weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and updated on Friday.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adklmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Carry proper safety equipment and weather protection and bring plenty of water and lights, and a map. When on the trail, stay together, monitor the time, and be prepared to turn back. Accidents happen to the most experienced people. Be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Always carry food, a space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, a map and compass, and the knowledge to use them. Inform someone of your itinerary and before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

September 26th, 2019 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 26, 2019

How Gore Mountain Got The Name On Its New Logo

Gore Mountain Ski Area Map With Gore It IS Named After (Courtesy Adirondack Atlas)When the earliest Adirondack maps were drawn, Gore Mountain’s true summit could not be clearly identified. As colonial surveyor Verplanck Colvin put it “the highest point always seemed to disappear in the intricate group of peaks of which the mountain was composed.”

As the area around the mountain was increasingly surveyed, a “gore” developed between two large tracts of land, Hyde’s Patent, and the southeast line of  the Totten & Crossfield Purchase.  It was in or near this gore –  a surveyor’s term indicating an unmapped triangular or tapered area between two surveyed areas that does not connect (or close) along a common line – that the mountain sat. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 26, 2019

Amy’s Park Trail Race Set For Saturday

2019 amys adventureThe Lake George Land Conservancy’s (LGLC) NextGen Committee is set to host its third annual Amy’s Adventure Race for the Lake (Amy’s Race) at Amy’s Park located in north Bolton on Saturday, September 28th.

The race, a true trail run, is a rugged 4.5 miles/7.2 kilometers in length, is entirely off-road, and goes over brooks, up hills and through the scenic marshes of the 500-acre preserve. All ages are welcome to compete, and friends and family are encouraged to attend to cheer on the competitors. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Study Tracks Massive Loss of Birdlife Since 1970

bird decline chartA study published in the journal Science reveals that since 1970, bird populations in the United States and Canada have declined by 29 percent, or almost 3 billion birds, signaling what has been considered a widespread ecological crisis.

The results show tremendous losses across diverse groups of birds and habitats — from iconic songbirds such as meadowlarks to long-distance migrants such as swallows, and backyard birds such as sparrows. More research is needed to pinpoint primary causes for declines in individual species. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Saw-whet Owl Banding at John Brown’s Farm

Saw-whet owl immediately after its release from banding Dr. Nina Schoch, Executive Director and Chief Scientific Officer at the Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation and conservation biologist, zoologist and photographer Larry Master will be banding saw-whet owls at the John Brown Farm during October.

This banding is part of Project Owlnet. Project Owlnet facilitates communication, cooperation and innovation among a rapidly growing network of hundreds of owl-migration researchers in North America and abroad. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Skunks, Raccoons, Bats Could Be Added To Dangerous Animals List

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is planning to expand the list of animals regulated as “dangerous” in New York State.

Skunks, raccoons and bats would be added to the Dangerous Animals List, joining a much expanded list of more dangerous species of reptiles and mammals.  The revised list adds all other non-endangered or threatened primates, and Canid and Felid species, except domestic dogs and cats and fennec foxes to the list of animals which cannot be kept as pets.  » Continue Reading.