Almanack Contributor Audubon New York

Audubon New York

This content comes to the Adirondack Almanack courtesy of Audubon New York.


Sunday, July 10, 2022

Audubon Welcomes New Forest Program Associate Rosa Goldman

As a Forest Program Associate for Connecticut and New York, Rosa Goldman works with local landowners to make their forests healthier for birds and other wildlife.

Growing up in semi-rural western Massachusetts, Goldman recounts the impact forests had on her childhood:

“I definitely took forests for granted,” she said. “I was surrounded by them all the time, and loved spending time in the woods.”

It was not until she received her bachelor’s in environmental studies and moved to New York City that Goldman realized just how powerful that influence was. “Suddenly the type of forest I’d grown up in wasn’t as accessible to me anymore. I started learning about urban forestry, but pretty quickly realized that I wanted to go back to school to study forests more broadly.”

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 2, 2022

Five forest birds that make their way back in spring

As we enter spring and welcome the warm weather, we are seeing more birds come back from their wintering grounds. Many forest birds migrate long distances to their breeding locations in the spring. It is crucial that these birds have quality habitat so they can nest, feed, and raise their young to ensure the next generation of the species.

Most neotropical migrants leave the northeast in September and return in April and May. Each bird species has different habitat requirements, so it is key to have a healthy and diverse forest to fulfill all their needs. A healthy forest is composed of multiple age classes and species of trees, provides ecosystem services, and supports forest birds and other wildlife.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 26, 2022

Bird Migration FAQs

tree swallow

Below, we’ve compiled some of the most frequently asked questions having to do with bird migration, their journeys, and ways we can welcome them back.

(At left, a tree swallow, illustration by David Allen Sibley, courtesy of Audubon New York)

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 22, 2022

Found an injured bird? Here’s how to help

baby bird

Few things are more heartbreaking than encountering an injured, sick, or orphaned bird (adult or chick) or other wild animal. It is in our human nature to want to help, but how do we make sure we do more good than harm? Follow these important guidelines.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 17, 2022

Three birds that nest in the off-season

great horned owl

By Suzanne Treyger

Meet several species that prefer to breed outside of spring and early summer.

Generally speaking, most birds nest when the temperatures are warmer and food resources, like insects and fruits, are abundant.

Late spring and early summer are the busiest breeding seasons for birds, but there are several forest species that prefer to nest outside of that peak time. Let’s take a look at three odd-season nesters and their preferred forest habitat.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 10, 2022

Uihlein Maple Research Forest named Bird-Friendly Maple Syrup Producer

Uihlein sugar house

Just in time for sugaring season, Cornell University’s Uihlein Maple Research Forest is being recognized for managing its 350-acre sugarbush in ways that help declining forest birds.

Cornell University’s Uihlein Maple Research Forest in Lake Placid, a 7,000-tap research forest and commercial maple operation, has become an official Bird-Friendly Maple producer. Through the Bird-Friendly Maple project (a collaborative effort between Audubon, Cornell and the New York State Maple Producers Association), they will manage their 350-acre sugarbush—the forest area where maple syrup is produced—in ways that provide more resilient bird habitat. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 22, 2022

When considering birds, winter is ideal time for forest management

white-throated sparrow

By Zack Boerman

While it’s common for forest management activities to be carried out year round, seasons are an important consideration when working with birds.

In the summer, for example, you’ll easily notice if your forest is well-shaded by a large mature canopy, resulting in bare ground underneath. In this scenario, birds that need shrubs and small trees growing on the forest floor, like Ruffed Grouse and Black-throated Blue Warbler, may be absent.

» Continue Reading.



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