Almanack Contributor Editorial Staff

Editorial Staff

Stories under the Almanack's Editorial Staff byline come from press releases and other notices.

Send news updates and story ideas to Almanack Editor Melissa Hart at [email protected]


Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Saranac Lake ArtWorks gains not-for-profit status

There’s a New Not-for-Profit in the North Country.

Saranac Lake ArtWorks, a community-based organization founded and operating since 2008, recently announced that it has achieved not-for-profit status as a 501(c)3, enhancing its ability to support local artists and cultural organizations throughout the area. 

Saranac Lake ArtWorks has established the tri-lakes region as an arts destination over the past 12 years by bringing area artists, galleries and cultural organizations together to market their events and work collectively. Saranac Lake ArtWorks has also presented its own signature events:

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Join the Invasive Species Mapping Challenge

NY iMapinvasvies is now running their fith annual Invasive Species Mapping Challenge, available to anyone.

The challenge consists of tracking invasive plants and animals across New York State in order to help prevent the spread of these species.

This year’s challenge will focus on the Jumping Worm, the Tree of Heaven, the Water Chestnut, and the European Frogbit. Through July 15, try and find any or all of the four species, report them to the iMap app (available for free) and compete with other seekers on their leaderboards, earning the title of champion in the process. To view more information on the competition and the current leaderboards, check out iMaps website.


Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Increased Bear Activity in Adirondack High Peaks

Sunday, July 5, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) temporarily closed campsites and lean-tos in the Lake Colden area in the Adirondack High Peaks, Essex County, after a recent increase in bear activity. The sites are now reopen. Campers in other areas of the Eastern High Peaks are encouraged to follow DEC guidance for dealing with nuisance bears. Minimizing human-bear interactions can be accomplished through a few simple steps. Adirondack Explorer editor Brandon Loomis was backpacking over the weekend and experienced the increased bear activity firsthand. Read about it here (and watch a video): https://www.adirondackexplorer.org/stories/state-captures-bear-that-raided-lake-colden-campsites » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Wild Center set to reopen July 15

The Wild CenterStarting July 15, The Wild Center natural history museum in Tupper Lake will be back in business with a phased reopening.

Starting with the Wild Walk and outdoor experiences, the museum will be implementing a limited capacity along with enhanced operational procedures and cleaning protocols.

To find more information and to reserve a spot visit this link.

To complete the Wild Center’s reopening survey visit this link.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 6, 2020

DEC Launches New Fishing, Hunting, and Trapping Licensing System

lake lilaThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced their new DEC Automated Licensing System (DECALS).

DECALS is an overwork of the previous licensing system designed to incorporate more user-friendly information to help users locate vendors, receive instant copies of a license, and enter and view harvest information and more.

As the system progresses and new features are added and updated, DECALS will include events calendars with upcoming season dates including youth hunts, clinics, and free fishing days. Full integration with the DEC’s Hunter Education Program which would make it easier to register for courses and automatically update certifications, and auto-renewal options for all annual licenses.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 6, 2020

Depot Theatre offers socially distanced kids camps

Depot Theatre in Amtrak train stationThe Depot Theatre is pleased to announce that it has developed an alternate outreach and education program for in-person learning this summer.

The Depot Theatre Academy 2020 outreach and education program, originally set to be held inside the Whallonsburg Grange Hall as in past years, will be held outdoors, under a large, open-sided tent in the one-acre parkland behind Whitcomb’s, the Grange-owned building directly across the street. The dates for the junior program (ages 8-12) are July 13-24, and the senior program (ages 13+) dates are July 27-August 7, 2020.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 5, 2020

Solar project to benefit the bees, too

Saranac Lake Community Solar has partnered up with AdkAction to complete a local community solar project which will create 10 acres of pollinator habitat.

These 10 acres will provide a local source of clean energy for the village of Saranac Lake, as well as its surrounding communities. The solar farm will provide homeowners, renters, and businesses solar energy without the cost of equipment, installation and maintenance, and thanks to the support of AdkAction’s pollinator project, this will be the first pollinator-friendly solar farm in the Adirondacks.

 

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 5, 2020

Weekly news roundup


Friday, July 3, 2020

Wild Center launches kids nature program

Join The Wild Center educators this summer as they dive in to explore nature around us. No matter where you call home, you are invited to complete a Jr. Naturalist Book and become an official Wild Center Jr. Naturalist!
Going on a journey through the natural world, covering topics from insects and pollinators, to erosion and weather, to amazing apex predators. Check out The Wild Center’s social media pages and website each Monday for the release of new Jr. Naturalist Pages and challenges. Each page will be filled with activities for you to develop your skills as a Jr. Naturalist, encouraging you to get outside to explore, observe, create, and engineer.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, July 3, 2020

Latest news headlines


Thursday, July 2, 2020

Tupper Lake announces paddling challenge

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has launched a Tupper Lake Triad paddling challenge.

While hiking challenges have continuously grown in popularity throughout the Adirondacks, so has the Triad in Tupper Lake. Since 2014, more than 5,000 people have completed the Tupper Lake Triad hiking challenge. To build off of the success of the hiking challenge, a committee including ROOST, community leaders, and business owners have worked to establish the Tupper Lake Paddling Triad.

Paddlers are invited to complete what is believed to be the first water-based challenge within the Adirondack Blue Line. By completing three paddles near Tupper Lake, adventurers can earn a sticker, patch, and inclusion on the finisher roster.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 2, 2020

OSI protects 9,300 acres in Clinton, Saratoga counties

The Open Space Institute (OSI) is celebrating the permanent protection of nearly
9,300 acres of forested land in the Adirondacks. The project, achieved
in partnership with private landowners, will support sustainable timber
practices in the region and expand recreational opportunities

Under the terms of the “Boeselager Working Forest” agreement, OSI secured conservation and recreation easements on two properties owned by the Ketteler-Boeselager family, which has a long-standing commitment to conservation in the Adirondacks, and their native Germany.

The two newly eased properties in the Clinton County towns of Black Brook, Dannemora, and Saranac total 4,970 acres and will be managed as working forest
using sustainable timber practices.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 2, 2020

DEC joins invasive species awareness campaign

Adirondack Watershed Institute steward watches over the Second Pond boat launch near Saranac LakeThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), in cooperation with seven Great Lakes states and two Canadian provinces, have teamed up on the second annual Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Landing Blitz, a regional campaign to inform boaters and others about the risks of introducing and spreading these invasive pests.

During this coordinated outreach effort, partners throughout the Great Lakes region are educating the public at hundreds of water access sites through July 5.

AIS are non-native aquatic plants and animals that can cause environmental and economic harm and harm to human health. Many AIS have been found in the lakes, ponds, and rivers of New York, and can be transported from waterbody to waterbody on watercraft and equipment.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Lake George area posts 500+ job openings

Lake GeorgeA collaboration of local businesses, community and government leaders has launched LakeGeorgeIsHiring.com to present the many job opportunities now available. The site features open positions for all levels of experience, including cooks, housekeepers, front desk staff, bussers, food runners, waitstaff, bartenders, maintenance, security, marketing, delivery drivers and more.

“There are over 500 jobs available in Warren County right now and it is really important that we are able to fill the gaps that exist from the seasonal international workers we usually have during the summer months,” according to Liza Ochsendorf, Director of Employment & Training Administration. She adds that it’s a great opportunity for the younger workforce to learn about the hospitality industry or someone ready for a career change since there are opportunities for advancement and networking during the busy tourist season. With so many jobs open in the Lake George region, businesses are offering competitive wages and benefits — some are even including accommodations for those who live too far away to easily commute.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 30, 2020

High Peaks Recommendations Should Connect to Management Plan

The following is commentary from Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve

Recognizing the initial efforts of the High Peaks Strategic Planning Advisory Group, which issued an interim report last week, Adirondack Wild’s David Gibson had this to say: “An advisory body of diverse stakeholders, all volunteers, has been meeting distantly during the pandemic but nonetheless has reached consensus on recommendations to address some key existing pressure points in the High Peaks Wilderness region. During these tough times, that is an impressive accomplishment.”

However, Adirondack Wild is concerned that the group’s recommendations should be connected to the 335-page, approved 1999 DEC High Peaks Wilderness Complex Unit Management Plan, or UMP.  “Almost every one of the advisory group’s interim recommendations, including expanded use of Leave No Trace, Human Waste, Education and Messaging, Trail Inventory and Assessment, Data Collection and Visitor Information, and Limits on Use can be traced back to policies and actions in the adopted Wilderness UMP. Yet the interim report makes no mention of the UMP and that’s a worry,” Gibson added.

Adirondack Wild believes that ignoring the High Peaks Unit Management Plan invites management and user conflicts. “The UMP, which took years of stakeholder efforts and was adopted by the Adirondack Park Agency and DEC, is the coordinating document that ties otherwise disparate management activities together to benefit an enduring Wilderness resource.  We know the UMP may need to be updated to meet current challenges. The Advisory Group ought to be devoting part of its time to recommend specific parts of the UMP that require updating,” he continued.

To quote from the DEC’s High Peaks UMP, “without a UMP, wilderness area management can easily become as series of uncoordinated reactions to immediate problems. When this happens, unplanned management actions often cause a shift in focus that is inconsistent and often in conflict with wilderness preservation goals and objectives. A prime objective of wilderness planning is to use environmental and social science to replace nostalgia and politics. Comprehensive planning allows for the exchange of ideas and information before actions, that can have long-term effects, are taken.”

“One concern we have is that the task force has recommended that the Limits On Use pilot study be conducted on private land adjacent to the High Peaks when, in fact, it is the overused eastern High Peaks Wilderness – public land – that is in need of a well-designed pilot program limiting use.  The 1999 UMP called for a working group to develop a camping permit system, with any decision to implement based upon public input and UMP amendment. That was never done.  A pilot program on private land over the next three years further deflects time and attention away from a critical High Peaks management tool that ought to be tested on public land.”

Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve is a not-for-profit, membership organization which acts on behalf of wilderness and wild land values and stewardship. More on the web at www.adirondackwild.org.

 

Photo: Crowding on Cascade Mountain, eastern High Peaks Wilderness by Dan Plumley/Almanack archive



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