Almanack Contributor Fred LeBrun

Fred LeBrun


Fred LeBrun is a regular contributor to Adirondack Explorer, and has been one of the defining voices of the Albany Times Union for more than forty years, serving the newspaper as suburban beat reporter, city editor, arts editor, restaurant critic and columnist on state politics.

LeBrun's “Hudson River Chronicles,” recounted an 18-day adventure downriver from Mount Marcy to New York Harbor in September 1998; he repeated most of the journey in 2009.


Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Era of Private Sportmen’s Clubs Ends

gooley-club-600x357As I write this, the debate is continuing to rage over how much motorized access should be allowed on former Finch, Pruyn lands sold to the state, but regardless of the decision, the age of private hunting and fishing clubs on those lands is quietly drawing to a close.

We’re in the middle of a ten-year slide to oblivion for the iconic Gooley Club, the Polaris Mountain Club, and others, but this is a significant year in that slide. As of a year ago, there were thirty-three clubs leasing land from the Nature Conservancy, which bought the Finch, Pruyn properties in 2007 in the most significant land acquisition since the creation of the Adirondack Park. Of those, twenty-three have or had camps, as in permanent structures, on their lease-holdings. A few of those have already folded operation. More will follow year by year as doomsday approaches, until, by September 30, 2018, every vestige of those camps will be gone at owner expense, all leases will end, and an Adirondack way of life will slip into history. Regardless of how the lands are classified and managed, they will become wholly public lands. » Continue Reading.