Almanack Contributor Ken Johnston

Ken Johnston

A native of Ticonderoga, Ken Johnston graduated from SUNY Brockport in 2015 with a combined degree in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology with minors in Business Administration and Chemistry. He has performed research on Great Lake wetlands, Finger Lake agricultural stream health, and harmful algal blooms and is working toward a master's degree in Biology. After graduation, he worked for Darrin Fresh Water Institute on the environmental monitoring program called The Jefferson Project. For the past couple of years, he has been working as a licensed NYS Wilderness Guide and boat captain on Lake George. Ken grew up loving the outdoors and can be found on the trails with his dog, Laikly.


Friday, June 25, 2021

Clubmoss: An Ancient Group of Plants

clubmossIf you have ever taken a hike or just walked through the woods, I guarantee you have seen this interesting group of understory plants. Clubmoss is a fern ally that includes horsetails, spikemosses, and quillworts. They are categorized as fern allies because of the combination of a spore-producing phase and a sexual phase. There are some 1,200 species worldwide. Inside the plant classroom clubmoss is referred to as Lycopodium which interoperates to lyco– wolf; podium– foot. Common names include ground pine, running pine, and even wolf claw clubmoss.

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Tuesday, June 15, 2021

All about Brook Trout

brook trout The state fish of New York (and 9 other states). Perhaps the most sought after fish in the Adirondacks due to its elusiveness and beauty. If you have ever caught one, they are a thrill and an absolute gem to the eye. In my experience, no other fish that you try to catch feels like you are hunting with a fishing rod and line. They are tricky, and thus a true challenge. It sure is a splendid feeling catching one.

With that said, the majestic Brook Trout is the appropriate species to kick off the first species account in what will become a series for the Adirondack Almanack.

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